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Published on 26 March 2024

Far more of the world’s money is flowing to the causes of the climate crisis, than to the solutions

In a world facing the urgent challenges of climate change, the need for action has never been more pressing.

We're committed to advocating for solutions that address the root causes of climate change and support the communities most affected by its devastating impacts.

One key aspect of our advocacy is campaigning for increased levels of climate finance. To realise justice for the most vulnerable, we need more public finance in the form of grants, rather than loans. Here are five reasons why we believe climate finance is crucial:

1. Justice for the most vulnerable

Climate change disproportionately affects the world's poorest and most vulnerable communities, who often contribute the least to its causes. These communities bear the brunt of climate-related disasters, such as extreme weather events, rising sea levels and droughts, despite having the least capacity to adapt.

Climate finance is essential for ensuring that these communities have the resources they need to build resilience and adapt to a changing climate.

We all know that money talks. This is the year we make sure it listens.

Join us at this year’s Week of Action (16-19 April) and Digital Day of Action (Thursday 18 April).

2. Keeping our promises

Developed countries, as historic polluters, have a moral obligation to support developing countries in their efforts to reduce carbon emissions and adapt to climate change. However, the promises to deliver climate finance remain unmet.

Currently, only 25% of public climate finance is provided as grants, with the remainder mostly in the form of loans*.

Campaigning for climate finance means holding governments and institutions accountable for their commitments and ensuring that funding is delivered in a way that doesn't burden already struggling economies with more debt.

3. A new goal for climate finance

2024 is a critical year for climate finance. Towards the end of this year COP29, the annual UN climate negotiations, will bring world leaders together to agree a new goal for climate finance. Delivering this goal will be essential to realising climate action. Christian Aid is calling for this goal be ambitious in its scope, reflects the needs of developing countries and be matched with meaningful pledges of public finance made from historic polluters.

Read our coverage of COP28
Image credits and information i
The Time is Now mass lobby supporter event in response to the climate emergency took place on the 26 June 2019 at Parliament in London. Credit: Christian Aid
The Time is Now mass lobby supporter event in response to the climate emergency took place on the 26 June 2019 at Parliament in London.
Campaign for climate justice with us

The effects of global heating - storms, droughts and floods continue to impact the most vulnerable communities around the world. Join the fight for climate justice now.

4. Addressing debt distress

Debt levels are accelerating at an alarming pace, which is devastating for the most vulnerable. According to Oxfam, 91 low-income countries will spend nearly 17% of their government revenues on debt repayments in 2024.

Climate finance should not further the debt burden of developing countries. Instead, it should be provided in a way that supports sustainable development and poverty reduction.

Campaigning for climate finance means advocating for debt relief and increasing levels of grant based money that prioritise the needs of the most vulnerable countries. It also means looking at wider reforms of the international financial system, which is failing to address the challenges of the climate crisis.

5. Building a just and sustainable future

Ultimately, campaigning for climate finance is about building a more just and sustainable future for all. If governments stopped using precious public funds to subsidise destructive international corporations, and instead provided real support for community-led climate solutions, we could empower communities to tackle the climate crisis effectively, and help to build resilience against its impacts.

Image credits and information i
People gather at Parliament Square opposite Big Ben to start the climate vigil Credit: Cafod
People gather at Parliament Square opposite Big Ben to start the climate vigil
Make a difference this April

Join us at this year’s Week of Action (16-19 April) and Digital Day of Action (Thursday 18 April).

Climate finance is not just about allocating funds; it's about equity, justice, and solidarity.

It's about letting communities to lead the charge against the climate crisis and ensuring that no one is left behind. Join us in our campaign for climate justice and help create a brighter and more sustainable future for all.

*Oxfam, 2023.

Want to get involved?

Join our Week of Action (16-19 April) and our Digital Day of Action (Thursday 18 April).

Week of Action (16-19 April): Organise or join stunts, climate strikes, workshops, actions, demos to send a message that governments and finance institutions are failing the planet and that we need to #FixTheFinance. Don't forget to share photos, videos and messages on social media!

Digital Day of Action (Thursday 18 April): Post a photo or video selfie with a banner or sign #FixTheFinance, explaining why governments and finance institutions are failing the planet and that what is needed to #FixTheFinance.

Find out more now

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