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Christian Aid in the Philippines: an exit learning review

Building climate resilience and strengthening civil society

Health Facility Assessment Report

How prepared is our healthcare system for the COVID-19 pandemic? Existing health care delivery system both in the public and private sectors were assessed through a survey labelled Health Facilities Assessment (HFA). This survey was conducted by Christian Aid partners and led by Christian Aid Nigeria in three states across 12 Local Government Areas (LGAs). The objective of the survey was to assess the existing health services profile, physical infrastructure, equipment/supplies, human resources, auxiliary services and quality of health services been rendered to the communities. This is a five-month project funded by DFID and being implemented by Christian Aid Nigeria and Afghanistan through local partners. In Nigeria the intervention is implemented by a local consortium led by Christian Aid Nigeria and four local partners: Mercy Vincent Foundation (MVF) and Ekklisiyar Yan’Uwa ‘a Nigeria (Church of the Brethren in Nigeria) leading project activities in Borno state, Legal Awareness for Nigerian Women (LANW) is leading activities in Kaduna state while Community Links and Human Empowerment Initiative (CLHEI) is responsible for Benue state.

Illicit drugs and tough trade-offs in war-to-peace transitions

Millions of marginalised people rely on illicit drug economies - often deeply intertwined with armed conflicts - for their survival. But Agenda 2030, particularly Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16, makes no mention of illicit drug economies. It is clear that the war on drugs has not worked, and it is increasingly recognised that a new, development-based approach to tackling illicit economies is needed. But at present, the evidence base to inform such policies is weak. This report presents evidence on why illicit drugs are a development issue and why they matter for peacebuilding, before discussing the problem with current approaches, and the implications for drugs, peacebuilding and development policy. Report authors: Ross Eventon and Eric Gutierrez

Another chance to live and thrive

Amina Sani lost everything when Boko Haram attacked her village in 2015. Like many other people living in Gora, Shani Borno State Nigeria, Amina and her family returned to their village with all means of livelihood gone, everything destroyed. As a mother of 7, making a living as a potter proved hard. So, when Amina was enlisted to be part of a saving and loans scheme, and trained in business skills, supported by Christian Aid and WFP, she was extremely grateful. ‘May Christian Aid live long’. Amina prays. To support her children, Amina has remained extremely committed to the saving and loans scheme. With an initial seed fund of N12,000, Amina borrowed a further N5,000 from friends, just enough to start a grain business. Within weeks of buying and selling grain, Amina paid back her loan and invested in buying mobile network cards, which she now sells as well as grain. Now, when Amina sells her grain, she makes N1,000 per bag. The mobile network cards are also profitable, and she makes 10% profit on her investments in this area of her business. ‘Being a member of Christian Aid’s saving and loans scheme was a turning point in my life’, Amina says. She explains that making clay and pottery was previously not profitable, and that her new business has made life much easier for her and for her family. It has given her another chance to live and thrive. ‘My children now eat well’ Amina explains, and she is happy that her last child is active and happy. Amina is one of many women from Gora Village, Shani Borno State who have turned their lives around through the support of this project.

Giving Hope to People in Conflict

Christian Aid Blanket Supplementary Feeding Program (BSFP) project provided immediate life-saving food and nutrition assistance to breast-feeding and children under the age of five years.

Rising water and damaged livelihoods in Myanmar

Some areas of Kayin State, like many areas in Myanmar, are prone to flooding during monsoon season. However, in August of 2019, extreme weather caused unseen severe flooding in southern Myanmar.  Shortly after the flooding, Karen Baptist Convention (KBC) managed to carry out a rapid needs assessment and place a team of volunteers in the area. Partnership with Christian Aid and funding from Start Network allowed KBC to scale up their limited initial response and meet the critical food and water and sanitation needs of 3000 households. 

Syrian Civil Society: A closing door report

This report seeks to give a truer view of Syrian civil society, giving a voice to people who have often been mentioned only as a footnote to atrocities, as aid workers killed in a shelling, or vilified as terrorists in the narratives of the government and its allies. Since March 2011, Syria has experienced one of the bloodiest and cruellest conflicts of recent times. Hundreds of thousands have been killed and hundreds of thousands more injured.  But while these grim figures have been repeated in the western media frequently, less often told is the story of the Syrians who did everything in their power to counter this.  Against the backdrop of conflict arose an active Syrian civil society – Syrians on the ground who, more often than not, had no previous experience in this sector. Syrians who came from a society whose government allowed no space for civil society to grow: and yet it did. But as civil society’s space is being squeezed worldwide, to grasp the potential for Syrian civil society we must act now. The door is already closing and it will slam shut, returning the country to the pre-2011 hostile environment where civil society groups faced being shut down and their members and volunteers risked being arrested or imprisoned if they were perceived to challenge the state. This report is an appeal and a challenge. Will the international community support the Syrians who recognise the difficulty of the task they face?

Keeping the SDGs on track

Detailing how the three basic SDG principles can be put into practice by improving accountability mechanisms under the High Level Political Forum .

Keeping hope alive: IOPT case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in Israel and the occupied Palestinian territory, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This Study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. From conflict to peace in Israel and the occupied Palestinian territory Palestinian civilians living in Israel and the occupied Palestinian territory (IoPt) face discrimination and systematic denial of human rights. Ongoing occupation by Israel results in chronic insecurity that routinely manifests in violence.   In the West Bank (including East Jerusalem), forced displacement, home demolitions, Israeli settler violence and excessive use of force are commonplace. In Gaza, blockades by Israel and Egypt and the internal Palestinian split (ongoing since 2007) drive violence, and young people and women are particularly vulnerable. In Israel, Palestinian citizens make up 20% of the population and are discriminated against, resulting in deprivation and even forcible displacement. In Israel, 49% of Palestinians live in poverty; the West Bank economy is dependent on Israel’s and is propped up by international aid; and the World Bank describes Gaza’s economy as in ‘free fall’, noting that it is ‘an alarming situation with every second person living in poverty and the unemployment rate for its overwhelmingly young population at over 70%.’   Our work Christian Aid has worked in the Middle East since the 1950s. The IoPt programme currently has three areas of focus: promoting resilience, protecting human rights and transforming power to build peace. All three areas work towards a just and secure future for all people in IoPt.   Download the case study above or view the full report here

Keeping hope alive: Christian Aid's work on peace - Impact study 2019

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This Impact Study, and accompanying case studies, share some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Key facts In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the Sustainable Development Goals – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. (OECD). Violent conflict has spiked since 2010, with two billion people now living in countries where development outcomes are affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (World Bank, 2018). Much of this violence is due to recurring violence and protracted conflicts. It is estimated that 135 different countries have experienced conflict recurrence – a pattern that is deepening. We stand in solidarity with our local partners – households, community organisations and local leadership who live through conflict and violence first hand. We want governments, faith institutions and communities to want and work for peace in their societies and to keep hope alive. Peace is not something fluffy and aspirational. Peacebuilding can and does work.

Keeping hope alive: South Sudan case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in South Sudan, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Download the case study above or view the full report here

Keeping hope alive: Colombia case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in Colombia, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Download the case study above or view the full report here

Keeping hope alive: Central America case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in Central America, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Download the case study above or view the full report here

Keeping hope alive: internal investment fund review 2017-18

In 2015, Christian Aid established an internal investment fund to encourage a more specific focus on tackling violence and building peace, in line with the organisation’s strategic objectives.   This has involved:  four annual rounds of funding to date £400,000–£500,000 allocated to the fund each year projects supported in 16 countries, with budgets of £20,000–£100,000 projects funded subject to a competitive selection process. This review is part of a collection of content - 'Keeping hope alive'. Download the review above or view the full report here Context In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the international community for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. This rise in violence has been accompanied by a global undermining of civil society space and an increase in attacks on those at the frontline of protecting human rights and calling for peace locally, with more than 300 murdered in 2017. It is clear that peacebuilding efforts are off course and that development and faith-based actors have a role to play in changing violence to peace.  

Prayers for those affected by South Asia floods

Two prayers for those affected by flooding in India, Bangladesh and Nepal. 

Peace, illicit drugs and the SDGs - a development gap

The SDGs barely reach the places where peacebuilding is most urgent. Here, the illicit drug economy plays a complex, overlooked role in survival.