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Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part One - Guide

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the ECID programme.

Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part Two - Toolkit

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the Evidence and Collaboration for Inclusive Development (ECID) programme, funded by UK Aid.

Inclusive Peacebuilding - English

Online Training of Trainers for Gender Sensitive Peacebuilding

Inclusive Peacebuilding - Burmese

Online Training of Trainers for Gender Sensitive Peacebuilding

Bridging the gap

Fiscal justice in sexual and reproductive health and rights in Africa. 

Christian Aid in the Philippines: an exit learning review

Building climate resilience and strengthening civil society

Christian Aid Zimbabwe SMT

The team behind Christian Aid Zimbabwe

Devastating locusts

Thanks to the Scottish Government’s Humanitarian Fund, we were able to help farmers in Ethiopia recover after the locust plagues.

Tackling Malnutrition in South Sudan

Read our latest report from our UK Aid Match programme in South Sudan, tackling malnutrition for 28,000 women and children in Aweil North and Jur River.

Health Facility Assessment Report

How prepared is our healthcare system for the COVID-19 pandemic? Existing health care delivery system both in the public and private sectors were assessed through a survey labelled Health Facilities Assessment (HFA). This survey was conducted by Christian Aid partners and led by Christian Aid Nigeria in three states across 12 Local Government Areas (LGAs). The objective of the survey was to assess the existing health services profile, physical infrastructure, equipment/supplies, human resources, auxiliary services and quality of health services been rendered to the communities. This is a five-month project funded by DFID and being implemented by Christian Aid Nigeria and Afghanistan through local partners. In Nigeria the intervention is implemented by a local consortium led by Christian Aid Nigeria and four local partners: Mercy Vincent Foundation (MVF) and Ekklisiyar Yan’Uwa ‘a Nigeria (Church of the Brethren in Nigeria) leading project activities in Borno state, Legal Awareness for Nigerian Women (LANW) is leading activities in Kaduna state while Community Links and Human Empowerment Initiative (CLHEI) is responsible for Benue state.

Building Trusted Partnerships for Healthy and Resilient Communities

The health legacy project is implemented in five African countries; Burundi, Sierra Leone and South Sudan, Nigeria and Kenya. By August 2019 the project had completed two years of implementation. The project addresses the issue of gender justice, promotes equitable social norms and institutions, and improves accountability by building the agency of citizens. Evidence has shown the project to have positive impacts on lives of our beneficiaries and their communities. This includes improved resilience of families and communities, especially those in fragile and resource-challenged settings. They are better prepared in terms of ability to anticipate, identify, and respond to health risks.

Accountable Governance, Power and Human Rights Framework

This document articulates how Christian Aid addresses power imbalances through accountable governance and equipping people to access their rights.

Another chance to live and thrive

Amina Sani lost everything when Boko Haram attacked her village in 2015. Like many other people living in Gora, Shani Borno State Nigeria, Amina and her family returned to their village with all means of livelihood gone, everything destroyed. As a mother of 7, making a living as a potter proved hard. So, when Amina was enlisted to be part of a saving and loans scheme, and trained in business skills, supported by Christian Aid and WFP, she was extremely grateful. ‘May Christian Aid live long’. Amina prays. To support her children, Amina has remained extremely committed to the saving and loans scheme. With an initial seed fund of N12,000, Amina borrowed a further N5,000 from friends, just enough to start a grain business. Within weeks of buying and selling grain, Amina paid back her loan and invested in buying mobile network cards, which she now sells as well as grain. Now, when Amina sells her grain, she makes N1,000 per bag. The mobile network cards are also profitable, and she makes 10% profit on her investments in this area of her business. ‘Being a member of Christian Aid’s saving and loans scheme was a turning point in my life’, Amina says. She explains that making clay and pottery was previously not profitable, and that her new business has made life much easier for her and for her family. It has given her another chance to live and thrive. ‘My children now eat well’ Amina explains, and she is happy that her last child is active and happy. Amina is one of many women from Gora Village, Shani Borno State who have turned their lives around through the support of this project.

Giving Hope to People in Conflict

Christian Aid Blanket Supplementary Feeding Program (BSFP) project provided immediate life-saving food and nutrition assistance to breast-feeding and children under the age of five years.

Rising water and damaged livelihoods in Myanmar

Some areas of Kayin State, like many areas in Myanmar, are prone to flooding during monsoon season. However, in August of 2019, extreme weather caused unseen severe flooding in southern Myanmar.  Shortly after the flooding, Karen Baptist Convention (KBC) managed to carry out a rapid needs assessment and place a team of volunteers in the area. Partnership with Christian Aid and funding from Start Network allowed KBC to scale up their limited initial response and meet the critical food and water and sanitation needs of 3000 households. 

Gender lens to the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights briefing

In this briefing, ACT Alliance sets out its analysis and recommendations concerning the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights ahead of the negotiations taking place in October 2019.  Business principles do not always converge with human rights principles. In various dimensions, from violence against women, to women’s economic participation, to tax, trade and investment, the gendered disparities are not resolved uniquely by market participation and growth dynamics. In fact, the growth-based model often puts women and other individuals who are marginalised in disadvantageous positions, ie, trapped in poverty, in unequal power relations and subject to abuse and violence. We believe that in order to ensure respect for human rights, we need binding rules on business and human rights at all levels, including respect for human rights, conducting meaningful human rights due diligence and adequate reporting, as well as access to remedy for victims of human rights abuses.

An economy of life briefing

An economy of life: How transforming the economy can tackle inequalities, bring climate justice and build a sustainable future Our vision is that global institutions genuinely represent and are accountable to the interests of everyone, not just the rich and powerful. This means confronting the institutional structures, including the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF), cultural norms and power imbalances that work together to maintain the status quo. We need to look for new expressions of economic life. Measures of economic growth overlook human and environmental wellbeing. It is time re-evaluate. This briefing challenges the World Bank and IMF to be part of this change and to become of a progressive and positive force in an economic future that leaves no one behind and is beneficial for nature and the climate.