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Taking Action on Climate Justice

A conversation guide for church groups, to help equip you to take action.

Taking Action on Climate Justice Posters

A selection of climate justice posters for use in your church.

Illicit drugs and tough trade-offs in war-to-peace transitions

Millions of marginalised people rely on illicit drug economies - often deeply intertwined with armed conflicts - for their survival. But Agenda 2030, particularly Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16, makes no mention of illicit drug economies. It is clear that the war on drugs has not worked, and it is increasingly recognised that a new, development-based approach to tackling illicit economies is needed. But at present, the evidence base to inform such policies is weak. This report presents evidence on why illicit drugs are a development issue and why they matter for peacebuilding, before discussing the problem with current approaches, and the implications for drugs, peacebuilding and development policy. Report authors: Ross Eventon and Eric Gutierrez

Christian Aid expectations for COP25

Christian Aid's key asks for the COP25 climate conference in Madrid, Spain, December 2019. The past 18 months have seen a flurry of new scientific information on the state of the climate. Severe climate impacts are already being experienced, particularly by the poorest and most vulnerable. Communities and ecosystems are already suffering devastation even at the current 1ºC of warming. The fires in the Amazon, Congo and California, the South Asian floods, and other extreme weather events, like cyclones Idai and Fani, point to a climate system already in crisis. The world is in a state of climate emergency. The climate emergency is real and efforts to take action now must be a priority. We call on governments to make a step change in their climate ambition and in the support given to help developing countries achieve it. Key asks Mitigation All countries to recognise the scale of the climate challenge and the need for a fair global effort to achieve the Paris 1.5ºC goal. The Conference of Parties (COP) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change should deliver a mandate for all countries to enhance the mitigation part of their Nationally-determined contributions (NDCs) in line with the 1.5ºC goal. The common time frame should be in five-year cycles. Long-term strategies should include landscape analyses to plan for nature-based solutions, to increase resilience, and to store and sequester carbon. Finance Adequate climate finance is a prerequisite to greater ambition in poor countries. Developed countries need to step up in providing adequate public finance to both help build resilience, but also to allow clean development and fulfillment – and exceedance - of the conditional parts of the NDCs. Loss and damage The Warsaw International Mechanism on Loss and Damage (WIM) should put greater focus on averting loss and damage than on post-event addressing of it. New, additional and adequate sources of climate finance are needed to enhance action. The potential of nature-based solutions for resilience should be given greater consideration and implementation priority. Adaptation Developing countries should be supported to complete and implement country-driven, gender-responsive, participatory and transparent adaptation plans. The overall financial flows, as well as the proportion of finance for adaptation need to be increased to allow vulnerable people, communities and ecosystems to adapt to the changing climate. Article 6 Rather than rely on ‘flexibility’ mechanisms, countries should instead focus on making transformational changes to their economies. Kyoto credits should play no role in any Paris mechanisms. Article 6 provisions should be adopted as a package. The Article 6 mechanisms should explicitly recognise the non-fungibility of fossil and biological carbon and prevent trade between them. Strong social and environmental safeguards are essential to be agreed before use of flexibility mechanisms. Nature-based solutions COP should recognise the potential co-benefits of nature-based solutions, as detailed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) reports, and agree means to promote their implementation Nature-based solutions for mitigation should not be seen as an alternative to ending the use of fossil fuels. It should be seen as an additional and precautionary approach, with other co-benefits, including for resilience. Appropriate links with the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)’s provisions should be made, and coherent implementation encouraged. Gender and Climate The revision must ensure that gender balance approaches are adopted under all the bodies of the convention. Download the full briefing here

Christian Aid Ethiopia Annual Report 2018/19

This report shows the impact of our work and testimonies that show how Christian Aid Ethiopia is supporting the most vulnerable communities in hard to reach parts of the country. It highlights out work on humanitarian response, DRR, strengthening climate services to farmers and pastoral communities, markets development and our work on promoting gender sensitive programming and support to communities to challenge power structures and systems that perpetuate gender violence. 

World in disunion: Climate change and the Rugby World Cup

  The effects of climate change are being felt around the world and the Pacific islands are among the worst affected. But unless greenhouse gas emissions fall, the consequences in the coming decades will be far worse than anything seen so far. Fiji, Samoa and Tonga face an onslaught as the world warms. Hotter and more acidic oceans, due to higher levels of carbon dioxide, kill coral reefs upon which fish populations depend, while rising sea levels will swallow land, increase flooding and salinate water supplies. The region is also likely to experience more category 3 to 5 storms, such as last year’s Cyclone Gita which was the strongest tropical cyclone to hit Tonga since records began. Together these climate change impacts threaten to undermine the islands’ economies, deter tourists, making life increasingly tough and driving young people away, putting strain on the countries’ ability to field competitive rugby teams. Researchers warn of mass migration from the islands as a result of climate change in the coming decades. Alongside the Pacific island countries at the Rugby World Cup are some of the countries most responsible for the climate crisis. Major greenhouse gas polluters like the US, Australia, the hosts Japan, Russia, Canada, South Africa and the European nations will play at the tournament, to the tune of a world in union. But few, if any, of the most polluting competitors have credible plans to cut their emissions to safe levels - suggesting the World Cup’s theme song is just an empty promise. It is not too late to prevent dangerous climate change and to save the future for the Pacific islands, and the rest of the world. But it requires immediate action to cut emissions.

Syrian Civil Society: A closing door report

This report seeks to give a truer view of Syrian civil society, giving a voice to people who have often been mentioned only as a footnote to atrocities, as aid workers killed in a shelling, or vilified as terrorists in the narratives of the government and its allies. Since March 2011, Syria has experienced one of the bloodiest and cruellest conflicts of recent times. Hundreds of thousands have been killed and hundreds of thousands more injured.  But while these grim figures have been repeated in the western media frequently, less often told is the story of the Syrians who did everything in their power to counter this.  Against the backdrop of conflict arose an active Syrian civil society – Syrians on the ground who, more often than not, had no previous experience in this sector. Syrians who came from a society whose government allowed no space for civil society to grow: and yet it did. But as civil society’s space is being squeezed worldwide, to grasp the potential for Syrian civil society we must act now. The door is already closing and it will slam shut, returning the country to the pre-2011 hostile environment where civil society groups faced being shut down and their members and volunteers risked being arrested or imprisoned if they were perceived to challenge the state. This report is an appeal and a challenge. Will the international community support the Syrians who recognise the difficulty of the task they face?

Keeping hope alive: IOPT case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in Israel and the occupied Palestinian territory, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This Study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. From conflict to peace in Israel and the occupied Palestinian territory Palestinian civilians living in Israel and the occupied Palestinian territory (IoPt) face discrimination and systematic denial of human rights. Ongoing occupation by Israel results in chronic insecurity that routinely manifests in violence.   In the West Bank (including East Jerusalem), forced displacement, home demolitions, Israeli settler violence and excessive use of force are commonplace. In Gaza, blockades by Israel and Egypt and the internal Palestinian split (ongoing since 2007) drive violence, and young people and women are particularly vulnerable. In Israel, Palestinian citizens make up 20% of the population and are discriminated against, resulting in deprivation and even forcible displacement. In Israel, 49% of Palestinians live in poverty; the West Bank economy is dependent on Israel’s and is propped up by international aid; and the World Bank describes Gaza’s economy as in ‘free fall’, noting that it is ‘an alarming situation with every second person living in poverty and the unemployment rate for its overwhelmingly young population at over 70%.’   Our work Christian Aid has worked in the Middle East since the 1950s. The IoPt programme currently has three areas of focus: promoting resilience, protecting human rights and transforming power to build peace. All three areas work towards a just and secure future for all people in IoPt.   Download the case study above or view the full report here

Keeping hope alive: Christian Aid's work on peace - Impact study 2019

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This Impact Study, and accompanying case studies, share some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Key facts In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the Sustainable Development Goals – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. (OECD). Violent conflict has spiked since 2010, with two billion people now living in countries where development outcomes are affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (World Bank, 2018). Much of this violence is due to recurring violence and protracted conflicts. It is estimated that 135 different countries have experienced conflict recurrence – a pattern that is deepening. We stand in solidarity with our local partners – households, community organisations and local leadership who live through conflict and violence first hand. We want governments, faith institutions and communities to want and work for peace in their societies and to keep hope alive. Peace is not something fluffy and aspirational. Peacebuilding can and does work.

Keeping hope alive: South Sudan case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in South Sudan, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Download the case study above or view the full report here

Keeping hope alive: Colombia case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in Colombia, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Download the case study above or view the full report here

Keeping hope alive: Central America case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in Central America, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Download the case study above or view the full report here

Keeping hope alive: internal investment fund review 2017-18

In 2015, Christian Aid established an internal investment fund to encourage a more specific focus on tackling violence and building peace, in line with the organisation’s strategic objectives.   This has involved:  four annual rounds of funding to date £400,000–£500,000 allocated to the fund each year projects supported in 16 countries, with budgets of £20,000–£100,000 projects funded subject to a competitive selection process. This review is part of a collection of content - 'Keeping hope alive'. Download the review above or view the full report here Context In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the international community for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. This rise in violence has been accompanied by a global undermining of civil society space and an increase in attacks on those at the frontline of protecting human rights and calling for peace locally, with more than 300 murdered in 2017. It is clear that peacebuilding efforts are off course and that development and faith-based actors have a role to play in changing violence to peace.  

Peace, illicit drugs and the SDGs - a development gap

The SDGs barely reach the places where peacebuilding is most urgent. Here, the illicit drug economy plays a complex, overlooked role in survival. 

World Bank & IMF briefings

Read our briefing papers ahead of the World Bank Group's 2019 Spring Meetings The Big Shift Needed for Climate Justice A Just Global Economy Leave No One Behind? From Violence to Peace

Myanmar: Building a Culture of Dialogue manual - English

A facilitator’s manual to guide dialogue within and between communities in conflict. In Myanmar, violence and protracted conflict – often fuelled by fear, hatred and distrust – have a strong impact on people’s lives. Many years of peace building work make us believe in the importance of dialogue as a tool to build trust and strong relationships. Dialogue provides the opportunity to share feelings, understand different points of view and reflect on situations.   For our project ‘Sagar Wine’ (culture of dialogue) in Rakhine State, we developed a training manual. In three creative and interactive modules with many visuals, participants will explore personal development, understand the dynamics of conflict and practice dialogue facilitation skills. The manual ‘Building a Culture of Dialogue’ is available in English and Burmese language.