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Ghana learning review

A decade of innovation in tax justice and inclusive markets programming

Made in the Image of God: Caring for Creation (5-8 s)

Be a changemaker: Bible study 5-8-year-olds

Our Prophetic Journey Towards Climate Justice

Climate stories from black church leaders to inspire positive action.

Tackling Malnutrition in South Sudan

Read our latest report from our UK Aid Match programme in South Sudan, tackling malnutrition for 28,000 women and children in Aweil North and Jur River.

Building Trusted Partnerships for Healthy and Resilient Communities

The health legacy project is implemented in five African countries; Burundi, Sierra Leone and South Sudan, Nigeria and Kenya. By August 2019 the project had completed two years of implementation. The project addresses the issue of gender justice, promotes equitable social norms and institutions, and improves accountability by building the agency of citizens. Evidence has shown the project to have positive impacts on lives of our beneficiaries and their communities. This includes improved resilience of families and communities, especially those in fragile and resource-challenged settings. They are better prepared in terms of ability to anticipate, identify, and respond to health risks.

2019 Tax Perception Survey Report

This Tax Perception Survey was undertaken by the Consortium of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), led by Christian Aid under the DFID supported Public Financial Management (PFM) Project title “Strengthening Public Financial Management, Anti-Corruption and Accountability Institutions in Sierra Leone” to understand taxpayer perceptions on the taxes they pay, their knowledge of the tax system, and confidence level in those handling such taxes. It is also important to understand tax payers wider views of government and how this relates to their attitudes and motivation towards paying taxes.

Use and abuse of tax breaks: how tax incentives become harmful

Taxation is essential to raise sufficient, equitable and accountable financing for development. Only through taxation can governments fund public spending on the essential services at the quality and scale necessary to realise the rights of all citizens. Yet many Southern governments decide not to tax certain corporations and companies in the hope that this will attract cross-border investment. Despite mounting evidence that the practice of offering tax incentives is both largely ineffective and detrimental to development, it is widespread. This report explains how tax incentives can become harmful, and discusses what can be done to stop their abuse.

Press release: changing the course of under-five mortality in Nigeria

Our Partnership for Improved Child Health (PICH) project in Benue State, Nigeria, closed in August 2019. Read our press release to find out what we achieved and how communities have adapted. Every year, hundreds of thousands of children under the age of five years in Nigeria do not live up to their fifth birthday due to preventable childhood illnesses such as malaria, pneumonia, diarrhoea and severe acute malnutrition. Most under-five death occurs in remote, hard to reach communities where caregivers are faced with physical, social and financial barriers to access health services. Christian Aid , through this project, has empowered communities to take ownership of their own health by improving knowledge and health-seeking behaviour, giving hope in despair, and saving children under five who face imminent death due to barriers of access to and uptake of quality health services.  This project was funded by Christian Aid supporters and UK Aid Match from the UK government. 

Life-saving healthcare for Nigeria's children - UK Aid Match stories

Since September 2016, Christian Aid Nigeria has been working in four Local Government Areas, Kwande, Konshisha, Obi and Opokwu, in Benue State, Nigeria, to reduce child mortality and morbidity rates. Through our local partners Jireh Doo Foundation and Ohonyeta Care Givers, we have reached more than 300,000 children with lifesaving support from malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea through Christian Aid trained community health volunteers. The UK Aid match funded project has trained 996 community health volunteers to provide lifesaving treatment in the community, rather than relying on health centres that can be hard to reach, and care givers may not have the necessary funds to afford treatment. The programme also works through supporting and training Community Development Committee members to work with their communities to identify challenges and opportunities, and to create and deliver action plans to overcome obstacles to accessing healthcare.

Joint Country Programme newsletter - July - Sept 2018

A new country director, piped water comes to villages in Mumbeji, advocating for tax justice and more...

Meet Christian Aid Nigeria's Senior Management Team

At Christian Aid Nigeria Country programme, our vision is for a just, equitable and peaceful Nigerian society, where poverty has been eradicated and every person is empowered to live life in all its fullness. We work to improve the health of poor and marginalised people; raise community voices to demand accountability through advocacy and promoting engagement between people and government; improve gender equity and the participation of women and girls in development initiatives, and respond to humanitarian emergency to alleviate the suffering of people affected by conflict and disaster. Christian Aid’s programmes are managed by a team of highly skilled development professionals who bring years of experience in development work to implement inclusive programmes in all of the organisation’s programme themes. Find out more about our work in Nigeria here

Partnership for Change: Christian Aid in Sierra Leone

Christian Aid’s Sierra Leone programme started in 1988 with a focus on service delivery and humanitarian assistance. Since the civil war ended in 2002, we have had a greater emphasis on building the capacity of local partners to challenge the systems and structures that perpetuate poverty and inequality. Our vision is a Sierra Leone where poor and marginalised women and men have equal access to resources and services and thrive within a responsible state.

Christian Aid Ethiopia Annual Report 2017/18

Christian Aid has been working in Ethiopia for more than 30 years, initially responding to emergencies, but gradually building a long-term development programme. Our work has focused on food security, resilient livelihoods, health, accountable governance, economic justice, energy and climate change. Christian Aid Ethiopia has substantial experience and a strong reputation for working in remote locations, particular with vulnerable pastoral and agro-pastoral communities. Currently we operate in 39 districts in four regions – Oromia, Gambella, Benishangul-Gumuz, and Southern Nation, Nationalities and Peoples’ Region (SNNPR).

Humanitarian response to populations affected by violence in Konduga

A Christian Aid (CA) humanitarian response programme funded by the European Union’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations has reached more than 40,000 people affected by the conflict in Konduga area, within Borno State. Food Security and Livelihoods (FSL) and Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) are the major response areas which has targeted the most vulnerable persons. ECHO has empowered Christian Aid to support access to food for the most vulnerable persons in Konduga through cash based interventions. The food security response targeted 18,000 people through a cash transfer intervention to help the vulnerable access food. Those reached through food assistance are spread across five communities within Konduga Local Government Area, in Borno State.

Amazon Strategy: social, climate and economic justice

Our vision is to see an Amazon region where communities are the driving force behind sustainable development, challenging unjust systems to strive for social, climate and economic justice. We envision an Amazon region where development is inclusive and respects the environment. With these conditions, we hope to see a place where indigenous, Quilombola and farming communities can thrive.

Questionable Values? Policy Report

Why we believe that it is time to stop defending the indefensible across all the world’s tax havens. Following the hurricanes Irma and Maria that devastated a number of Caribbean islands in September this year, the focus has rightly been on supporting the hardest hit and those in greatest need. But as the rebuilding effort develops, many are starting to think more deeply about the long-term sustainability of these islands’ economies, and their ability to protect and provide for their populations in an economically and climatically uncertain future. What type of jobs, and what type of economy, should places such as the British Virgin Islands (BVI) be looking to build? This is a question that extends beyond the storm-hit Caribbean. Defensive measures against tax evasion and avoidance are on the rise in the US, the EU and emerging economies, driven in part by the exposure of these activities in successive leaks of information (most recently, the Paradise Papers). Such developments call into question the sustainability of any economic model that relies on providing various combinations of secrecy and low taxation. So far, many small offshore centres, and their supporters, have largely reacted defensively to the threat of change, arguing that media coverage has unfairly maligned ‘tax havens’; that the problem is not as large as portrayed; and that they are already instituting tax and transparency standards better than many large ‘onshore’ economies. However, careful scrutiny of one of the most comprehensive efforts to explain the role of international finance centres and to illustrate the impact that such a territory has on the global economy – the prominent report that the government-backed financial lobby group, BVI Finance, commissioned this year from consultancy firm Capital Economics – demonstrates major weaknesses in the arguments and conclusions presented, and suggests to us that such defences are more concerned with maintaining the status quo than a genuine concern for the wider global economy. Our analysis of the Capital Economics report is an example of why we believe that it is time to stop defending the indefensible across all the world’s tax havens. With public demand building for new regulation, and the ever-present threat of further mass leaks, the UK Government needs to initiate a serious discussion about alternative economic pathways for the British Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies. Alternative futures for offshore tax havens are not only vital for the poorest countries of the world that lose tax revenues each year to the offshore system, but also for the ordinary women and men in places like the BVI, for whom a secure future is dependent on the creation of robust, equitable and sustainable economies.