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Big Brekkie how-to guide

Your guide to transforming lives over breakfast.

Disaster alert: secondary school assembly

Age: 11-14 This 15-minute assembly will help pupils to understand more about disasters and can be used in response to a new disaster when it happens.

Disaster strikes primary school assembly

This assembly will help pupils to understand more about disasters, and can be used in response to a new disaster when it happens.

Disaster strikes simulation game

Age: 7-11 but can easily be adapted for older age groups. The Typhoon Town Challenge game gives an insight into what life is like for a community located in a particularly poor part of Metro Manila, the capital region of the Philippines. In this game, pupils work together in teams to plan and build their perfect town. But they’ll have to make some tough budgeting choices along the way. What will they do when disaster strikes? How will they cope? And have they got what it takes to work as a team to rebuild?

The Entertainer - Grant Foundation

The Entertainer - Grant Foundation partnering for a more just world

Devastating locusts

Thanks to the Scottish Government’s Humanitarian Fund, we were able to help farmers in Ethiopia recover after the locust plagues.

Tackling Malnutrition in South Sudan

Read our latest report from our UK Aid Match programme in South Sudan, tackling malnutrition for 28,000 women and children in Aweil North and Jur River.

Building Trusted Partnerships for Healthy and Resilient Communities

The health legacy project is implemented in five African countries; Burundi, Sierra Leone and South Sudan, Nigeria and Kenya. By August 2019 the project had completed two years of implementation. The project addresses the issue of gender justice, promotes equitable social norms and institutions, and improves accountability by building the agency of citizens. Evidence has shown the project to have positive impacts on lives of our beneficiaries and their communities. This includes improved resilience of families and communities, especially those in fragile and resource-challenged settings. They are better prepared in terms of ability to anticipate, identify, and respond to health risks.

Press release: changing the course of under-five mortality in Nigeria

Our Partnership for Improved Child Health (PICH) project in Benue State, Nigeria, closed in August 2019. Read our press release to find out what we achieved and how communities have adapted. Every year, hundreds of thousands of children under the age of five years in Nigeria do not live up to their fifth birthday due to preventable childhood illnesses such as malaria, pneumonia, diarrhoea and severe acute malnutrition. Most under-five death occurs in remote, hard to reach communities where caregivers are faced with physical, social and financial barriers to access health services. Christian Aid , through this project, has empowered communities to take ownership of their own health by improving knowledge and health-seeking behaviour, giving hope in despair, and saving children under five who face imminent death due to barriers of access to and uptake of quality health services.  This project was funded by Christian Aid supporters and UK Aid Match from the UK government. 

Assembly - Welsh

Stronger than the Storms: this assembly explains how people in Haiti are showing strength in the face of huge challenges. Welsh. 

Schools poster - Welsh

Our schools poster features two young super-heroes: Zaza and Jephthe.

Disaster strikes: all resources

Age: 7-11 but can easily be adapted for older age groups. Download all of our Disaster strikes resources. The pack includes: An assembly Curriculum links Simulation game Teachers notes Worksheets

Early warning and disaster preparedness in Nigeria media release

With funding support from the European Commission – Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO), Christian Aid has launched a project aimed at strengthening disaster preparedness in Nigeria (with a focus on flooding) by improving Early Warning and Early Response systems in Benue, Kaduna and Plateau States.

LPRR: Empowering communities to lead humanitarian response

The DFID DEPP funded LPRR consortium is led by Christian Aid and includes Action Aid, Concern Worldwide, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Saferworld and World Vision. It aims to increase preparedness and resilience capacity in conflict and response settings. As part of the project, King’s College London University designed and implemented a study in Bangladesh, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Kenya, Pakistan and the Philippines. It was one of the rare approaches which specifically asked 327 crises survivors and first responders from past humanitarian emergencies to draw upon their own experience and expertise to guide improved humanitarian response programming for long term resilience.

LPRR final evaluation report

The Linking Preparedness, Response and Resilience (LPRR) project, which is part of the DFID funded Disasters Emergencies Preparedness Programme (DEPP), was carried out from 2015 to the end of March 2018. The project was delivered by a consortium led by Christian Aid, which included Action Aid, Concern, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Safer World, and World Vision. The LPRR project brings together the expertise of response and resilience professionals (and frameworks) in order to support communities affected by emergencies and at the risk of violence. The consortium was present through a research component in eight countries, namely Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Philippines, Colombia, Indonesia, with pilot projects in Kenya, Pakistan and Myanmar. The project was delivered through three distinct strands: conflict prevention, humanitarian response, and learning.

LPRR: Humanitarian response strand learning paper

The Linking Preparedness, Response and Resilience, a DEPP funded, multi-agency project, supported seven local NGOs in Kenya and Myanmar to develop and pilot operational methodologies for supporting integrated community-led responses to humanitarian crises. The project was funded by the START network through UK aid and was led by Christian Aid. The approaches tested by the project were based on the research carried out by Kings College London (KCL), on the on-going action-research of carried out by Local to Global Protection (L2GP) and on the ideas, capacities and contexts of the LNGOs themselves. The pilots test the application of the recommendations made by communities as captured by the KCL research of how to improve humanitarian programming. This learning paper summarises the key findings to date from seven of these pilots in 3 local organisations from Marsabit County of Northern Kenya, two from NW Myanmar (Rakhine State) and two from SE Myanmar (Kayah and Kayin States). Given the small budgets for the pilots and the very short timeframes for their completion, they are the first step for the seven LNGOs to test and develop some of the components of the emerging ‘practice’ for facilitating locally-led emergency programming.