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Christian Aid in the Philippines: an exit learning review

Building climate resilience and strengthening civil society

Guidance on whistleblowing

It is the duty of every employee to speak up about genuine concerns in relation to criminal activity, breach of legal obligation (including negligence, breach of contract, breach of administrative law, miscarriage of justice, danger to health and safety or environment) and the cover up of any of these in the workplace. Christian Aid is committed to ensuring that any employee's concerns of this nature will be taken seriously and investigated, and as part of this commitment has developed this guidance note on whistleblowing.

Safeguarding policy

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of

Revenue Analysis, July 2020

This analysis aims at finding out how (in monetary terms) COVID-19 is impacting on domestic revenue collection and the extent to which the NRA is meeting its revised target for 2020 and that of the domestic revenue to GDP by 2023. Against this backdrop, the Budget Advocacy Network have decided to start tracking the above policy commitments with a view to give monthly real-time updates. In the meantime, information available from the Accountant General’s Office only include one month of COVID-19 (April). This means that we have included broader analysis to enrich this first issue of the report. 

Budget Credibility Report

This revenue and expenditure credibility analysis is designed to provide Sierra Leoneans, the Government of Sierra Leone (GoSL), development partners and other stakeholders with a full picture of revenue and expenditure in 2017, 2018 and 2019. Various Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment reports (2010, 2014, and 2018) have highlighted the challenges in implementing a credible budget in Sierra Leone. The aim is to highlight performance against the budget at the total and sector level, to draw out some of the reasons behind this, and identify the impacts on public service delivery. The assessment will assist government in addressing some of the challenges that are adversely affecting budget credibility. It will also provide a basis for dialogue between civil society, Parliament, development partners and the GoSL regarding its public financial management reform strategy (2018 – 2021) and delivery of the National Development Plan.

June 2020, Sierra Leone Anti-Corruption Court Monitoring Report

To help strengthen the fight against corruption, an Anti-Corruption Division of the High Court has been established. Pursuant to a Constitutional Instrument dated 4th April 2019, the court is mandated to hear and determine all anti-corruption matters instituted by the Anti-Corruption Commission. The new division, which is expected to be a model court for criminal cases, was set up as part of efforts to address some of the traditional challenges that confront the criminal justice system. These include undue delays in proceedings, limited courtrooms, and integrity deficit among some administrative staff. As part of the efforts of the consortium to promote and strengthen the work of the Anti-Corruption Commission monitors the proceedings from this court and this report is the first from our monitoring of its proceedings. 

Corruption Perception Survey Report, 2019

This report – commissioned by the Centre for Accountability and Rule of Law (with funding from DFID and support from Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) - seeks a bottom-up account from the Sierra Leonean people regarding the status of corruption. It examines their perceptions about the fight against corruption; about the institutions involved; about the delivery of public services, and about their own roles and actions in relation to the fight against corruption. The study was conducted between September and November 2019. Three data streams were utilized: a literature review; a social survey where 2619 persons were interviewed in all 16 districts of the country; followed by in-depth interviews geared towards getting detailed insights from experts and practitioners regarding their observations and reactions to the findings of the social survey 

Cost of Corruption in Sierra Leone Report, 2019

Corruption happens underground and its damage and volume can be difficult to quantify. This report systematically presents data on the quantitative estimate of the cost of corruption that occurred between 2016 - 2018 – the period leading up to the 2018 general elections in Sierra Leone onto the transfer of power to the opposition. The Centre for Accountability and the Rule of Law (CARL), along with its project consortium partners (Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) commissioned this study to generate data which anti-corruption agencies and their partners could utilise to develop more effective tools to respond to and track progress in fighting corruption. Data was collected from ten sectors which form 72.5 percent of the economy. The sectors studied include agriculture, mining, energy, fishery, construction, banking, education, health, transport and communication

Health Facility Assessment Report

How prepared is our healthcare system for the COVID-19 pandemic? Existing health care delivery system both in the public and private sectors were assessed through a survey labelled Health Facilities Assessment (HFA). This survey was conducted by Christian Aid partners and led by Christian Aid Nigeria in three states across 12 Local Government Areas (LGAs). The objective of the survey was to assess the existing health services profile, physical infrastructure, equipment/supplies, human resources, auxiliary services and quality of health services been rendered to the communities. This is a five-month project funded by DFID and being implemented by Christian Aid Nigeria and Afghanistan through local partners. In Nigeria the intervention is implemented by a local consortium led by Christian Aid Nigeria and four local partners: Mercy Vincent Foundation (MVF) and Ekklisiyar Yan’Uwa ‘a Nigeria (Church of the Brethren in Nigeria) leading project activities in Borno state, Legal Awareness for Nigerian Women (LANW) is leading activities in Kaduna state while Community Links and Human Empowerment Initiative (CLHEI) is responsible for Benue state.

Christian Aid’s gender pay gap report 2019-2020

A 2-page report from our Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi. The report covers: A comparison of both the mean (average) and median (mid-point) in the hourly rate we paid to men and women on 5 April 2019 How our gender pay gap is driven, according to our analysis How our gender pay gap compares to organisations across the UK and within our sector What we're doing to address the gender pay gap at Christian Aid

How Christian Aid pays its staff

The effective stewardship of resources is core to the vision and values that underpin Christian Aid’s work in seeking to bring about a fairer, more equitable world. We recognise the important responsibility we have to the poor communities we work with, our donors, supporters and the general public, to ensure we are open and transparent on how we use the funds that are so generously donated for the work we undertake.  We are committed to ensuring value for money in everything we do and this includes how we remunerate our staff. We operate a policy that is fair, equitable and consistent to attract, motivate and retain capable staff that have the skills and experience we require to implement the work we do.  What are our pay principles? Our salaries are set within in a policy that reflects the values and ethos of the organisation, benchmarking against other comparable charities and church organisations at a level that is just below or at the median of these comparators. The basic principle for determining salaries is that employees carrying out the same or similar jobs in the same location are paid the same or similar salary. Salaries differ where jobs are of a different size, complexity, responsibility and accountability. Tackling global poverty and social injustice is highly complex and we value the contribution that each individual employee makes to our organisation’s success. Our approach to reward is guided by the following principles which are applied equally to all our staff wherever they are located and whatever their position:  We will provide a total reward package which recognises contribution to the achievement of our aims. Our reward offering will be competitive in the marketplace from which we draw the people we need.  The reward decisions we make will be consistent and based on objective assessment of our organisational needs.  Wherever we can we will offer flexibility and choice so that individuals can achieve what is most relevant and has most value to them.  We will make arrangements which comply fully with relevant legislation wherever we are operating. How is pay governed? The implementation of our remuneration policy, which is set by the Board, is overseen by the Remuneration Committee. This committee has delegated authority to provide governance oversight and input on all matters concerning the principles and policies governing the pay and benefits of Christian Aid staff. Its responsibilities include: To consider any suggested changes to those principles and policies and make recommendations to the Board. To make recommendations to the Board for any necessary adjustments, consistent with affordability within agreed budget parameters. To collect and consider evidence of movements in the external pay market as it affects Christian Aid, and to make recommendations to the Board for any necessary adjustments required to ensure Christian Aid is able to recruit and retain appropriately skilled staff to implement its strategy effectively. To make recommendations from time to time to the Board on the broad policy framework and overall costs of the remuneration of the Chief Executive and the Directors and to determine the salary of the Chief Executive. Our lower salary band for all employed staff in the UK and Ireland is above the Living Wage, as is the salary of all third party contracted cleaning staff employed in our UK and Ireland regional and national offices. Christian is an accredited “Living Wage Employer”. For salaries of staff based in the UK and Ireland, the Board has adopted the “Hutton Fair Pay Review” recommendation which limits the differential of pay between the highest paid person and others, using a ratio based on the median salary. The Board has set this ratio at 4:1 on UK salaries. The salaries for our internationally based staff are set within their local employment market, against a benchmark of other comparable organisations, consistent with our overall remuneration policy. Further information on what we currently spend on salaries, including the salary of the Chief Executive, can be found in our 2016/17 Annual Report. How much is Christian Aid’s Chief Executive paid? Christian Aid’s Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi, earned £132,000 last year. We recognise that this is a large sum of money. Christian Aid makes every effort to avoid paying higher salaries than are necessary. We pay our staff salaries the same as, or below, the median of other church-based and/or international development agencies. A recent survey of UK charities showed that we pay significantly below the average pay of £167,000 for CEO’s of the top 100 charities, in terms of income, in the country. The Chief Executive role carries an immense amount of responsibility. This includes the stewardship, governance and oversight of how we spend our £106m annual income, the welfare of up to 900 staff and the projects we support to help lift millions of people out of poverty. Within Christian Aid we are committed to the idea that transparency empowers – that’s why we’re already one of the most transparent organisations in the sector. We’ve always been clear on who earns what and we’re accredited with the highest international standards of transparency. How do we manage annual pay reviews? Each year, Christian Aid conducts an annual pay review of staff salaries. In the UK and Ireland we calculate inflation rates using the average of Average Weekly Earnings Index (AWE) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Any inflationary award or other necessary adjustments made on salaries are subject to affordability. For our internationally based staff we use country data from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for calculating cost of living increases for country offices. Adjustments are implemented on April 1. Contact us

Another chance to live and thrive

Amina Sani lost everything when Boko Haram attacked her village in 2015. Like many other people living in Gora, Shani Borno State Nigeria, Amina and her family returned to their village with all means of livelihood gone, everything destroyed. As a mother of 7, making a living as a potter proved hard. So, when Amina was enlisted to be part of a saving and loans scheme, and trained in business skills, supported by Christian Aid and WFP, she was extremely grateful. ‘May Christian Aid live long’. Amina prays. To support her children, Amina has remained extremely committed to the saving and loans scheme. With an initial seed fund of N12,000, Amina borrowed a further N5,000 from friends, just enough to start a grain business. Within weeks of buying and selling grain, Amina paid back her loan and invested in buying mobile network cards, which she now sells as well as grain. Now, when Amina sells her grain, she makes N1,000 per bag. The mobile network cards are also profitable, and she makes 10% profit on her investments in this area of her business. ‘Being a member of Christian Aid’s saving and loans scheme was a turning point in my life’, Amina says. She explains that making clay and pottery was previously not profitable, and that her new business has made life much easier for her and for her family. It has given her another chance to live and thrive. ‘My children now eat well’ Amina explains, and she is happy that her last child is active and happy. Amina is one of many women from Gora Village, Shani Borno State who have turned their lives around through the support of this project.

Giving Hope to People in Conflict

Christian Aid Blanket Supplementary Feeding Program (BSFP) project provided immediate life-saving food and nutrition assistance to breast-feeding and children under the age of five years.

Rising water and damaged livelihoods in Myanmar

Some areas of Kayin State, like many areas in Myanmar, are prone to flooding during monsoon season. However, in August of 2019, extreme weather caused unseen severe flooding in southern Myanmar.  Shortly after the flooding, Karen Baptist Convention (KBC) managed to carry out a rapid needs assessment and place a team of volunteers in the area. Partnership with Christian Aid and funding from Start Network allowed KBC to scale up their limited initial response and meet the critical food and water and sanitation needs of 3000 households. 

Keeping the SDGs on track

Detailing how the three basic SDG principles can be put into practice by improving accountability mechanisms under the High Level Political Forum .

SABI Learning Review: Triggering Citizen Action

SABI is a programme operating in all 16 districts of Sierra Leone to increase citizen demands to their governments for the delivery of basic services. This learning review asked the question – has SABI succeeded in supporting community citizen action for effective governance and improved public services? It draws on SABI’s database of 786 community action plans, and interviews and groups discussions with implementing partners, youth accountability volunteers and community members.

Prayers for those affected by South Asia floods

Two prayers for those affected by flooding in India, Bangladesh and Nepal. 

Prayer for the Democratic Republic of Congo

A prayer for all those affected by the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo.