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Racing to End Poverty

The global impact of Covid-19 adversely affected programme delivery across the world in 2020. However, despite the negative impact of the pandemic, the worsening security situation and dwindling donor funding, Christian Aid Nigeria made giant strides in d

Salt newsletter February 2021

Salt Business Network newsletter February 2021.

Salt Newsletter November 2020

Download the Autumn 2020 edition of the Salt Network Newsletter to explore leading with influence.

Salt Newsletter July 2020

Download the latest Salt newsletter for July, covering topics including faith in uncertain times, building diverse businesses, and business with purpose. 

April 2020 newsletter

Download the Salt newsletter for April, covering becoming a leader of impact and more.

Circle the City 2020 London A4 poster

Download and print off this poster to advertise the 2020 London Circle the City event.

Socialise to Immunise: boosting vaccination uptake through Facebook

In Myanmar's Kachin state only 54-60% of children under 2 years have received all basic vaccinations. However, the rates for individual vaccination of children is much higher, such as 91.2% for the BCG vaccine.[i] We know that vaccine hesitancy is a complex issue. The WHO identifies three main driving factors; confidence, complacency and convenience. Conventional methods to increase basic child vaccination rates, mostly target caregivers directly to increase people’s knowledge and thus change attitudes and behaviour. Our own research shows that social networks have a strong influence on immunisation behaviour.[ii] An important factor in this respect is the ‘social bandwagon effect’, meaning that caregivers do what everyone does, adhere to the social-cultural norm regarding vaccination, which can be to either follow or not follow the vaccination schedules. The slightest increase in uptake by influential individuals in a group leads to positive spillover in the wider community.[iii] Our Socialise to Immunise project will be piloting and testing an unconventional approach, using Facebook. This interactive approach, based on the premise that the social norm of vaccination behaviour is strongly influenced by peer pressure (social bandwagon), will involve and connect different stakeholders in the vaccination-demand process: caregivers, household decision-makers, community immunisation champions, community members, health care providers. This approach is innovative as it will trial a digital social network which simultaneously addresses the three driving factors as identified by WHO. This update shows how the first stages of the project are progressing and some learnings we are taking forward. [ii] Shi et al., Voluntary vaccination through self organizing behaviors on locally mixed social networks, Scientific Reports 7, 2017 (2665) [iii] Buttenheim AM, Asch DA. Behavioral economics: the key to closing the gap for MDGs 4 and 5? Maternal and child health journal 2013; 17 (4): 581-5 [i] Myanmar Demographic and Health Survey, 2015-2016

January 2020 Newsletter

Download the Salt newsletter for January covering leadership and models of development. 

Scotland Annual Review 2019

Scotland annual review 2019

STAR Ghana Foundation annual report 2019

STAR Ghana delivers transformational change that advances democracy, accountability and social inclusion. What we have done We have supported civil society organisations through grants and technical assistance, and convened meetings and discussions. We have launched major funding calls on gender equality and social inclusion, media, anti-corruption and local governance, and supported work under strategic opportunity calls. We enabled 87 civil society organisations to mobilise and support citizens to take action around issues such as inclusive access to quality public goods and services, tackling corruption, and promoting good governance. With support from our grant partners, more than 5 million citizens have engaged with duty bearers at all levels of governance, including Parliament, district assemblies and traditional authorities. 'STAR Ghana is helping citizens and civil society organisations to become more active and informed, able to speak up and engage constructively with duty bearers at all levels.' We have seen these institutions respond and deliver. The work we support has led to more inclusion and accountability – and real improvements in people’s lives. At the same time, it has given citizens new knowledge, new ideas and greater confidence, enabling them and their organisations to apply their learning to other issues and areas. Lessons and challenges To make sure lessons were learned from the work, we have worked with stakeholders to reflect on their experiences and gather findings. We have compiled and shared key learning documents. A new foundation We have paved the way for transition to the STAR Ghana Foundation, a new national Ghanaian entity, which was successfully launched in November 2018. Our achievements are all the more remarkable for taking place in a difficult context of growing inequality, and dwindling funding for civil society organisations and questions around their legitimacy and impact. We have responded to these challenges. As Ghana undergoes much-needed economic development, it is important that it doesn’t come at the cost of equality, but also delivers for vulnerable people including women, children and people with disabilities. Civil society can drive this debate and amplify the voice of the marginalised. All of us at the STAR Ghana Foundation thank you for your active support and look forward to working with you in bringing about transformational change towards an equitable and prosperous Ghana. Dr Esther Ofei-Aboagye, Chair, Governing Council, STAR Ghana Foundation

Press release: changing the course of under-five mortality in Nigeria

Our Partnership for Improved Child Health (PICH) project in Benue State, Nigeria, closed in August 2019. Read our press release to find out what we achieved and how communities have adapted. Every year, hundreds of thousands of children under the age of five years in Nigeria do not live up to their fifth birthday due to preventable childhood illnesses such as malaria, pneumonia, diarrhoea and severe acute malnutrition. Most under-five death occurs in remote, hard to reach communities where caregivers are faced with physical, social and financial barriers to access health services. Christian Aid , through this project, has empowered communities to take ownership of their own health by improving knowledge and health-seeking behaviour, giving hope in despair, and saving children under five who face imminent death due to barriers of access to and uptake of quality health services.  This project was funded by Christian Aid supporters and UK Aid Match from the UK government. 

Salt newsletter September 2019

Download the Salt newsletter for September covering the economy and the upcoming Salt conference.

Keeping hope alive: internal investment fund review 2017-18

In 2015, Christian Aid established an internal investment fund to encourage a more specific focus on tackling violence and building peace, in line with the organisation’s strategic objectives.   This has involved:  four annual rounds of funding to date £400,000–£500,000 allocated to the fund each year projects supported in 16 countries, with budgets of £20,000–£100,000 projects funded subject to a competitive selection process. This review is part of a collection of content - 'Keeping hope alive'. Download the review above or view the full report here Context In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the international community for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. This rise in violence has been accompanied by a global undermining of civil society space and an increase in attacks on those at the frontline of protecting human rights and calling for peace locally, with more than 300 murdered in 2017. It is clear that peacebuilding efforts are off course and that development and faith-based actors have a role to play in changing violence to peace.  

Christian Aid Ethiopia newsletter July 2019

Latest updates from Christian Aid Ethiopia on our programmes, including promoting women's entrepreneurship in sustainable energy, meteorological services, drought recovery, veterinary services, education and water projects. Projects featured include the EU-funded Breaking the Barriers project and the DEC drought response.

Salt newsletter July 2019

Download the Salt newsletter for July covering entrepreneurial humility and engendering business and human rights. 

Christian Aid Nigeria Annual Report 2018

The very latest updates and information from our country programme in Nigeria

Salt newsletter April 2019

Download April's Salt newsletter - including impact investing as a tool for justice, and our place in the fourth Industrial Revolution.