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Christian Aid in the Philippines: an exit learning review

Building climate resilience and strengthening civil society

Nepal earthquake mid-term review

A mid-term review of Christian Aid's response to the Nepal earthquakes of 2015. Compiled by an independent assessor, this report includes key findings, recommendations, background and methodology. The management response and annexes can be found at the end of this document. This is an internal document, being shared for the benefit of others working on this response and to highlight key learnings and recommendations.  Summary The earthquakes of April and May 2015 had a devastating impact on the people of Nepal. According to the Nepal Government Ministry of Home Affairs, there were 8,891 fatalities, 22,302 injured, 604,930 homes destroyed, and a further 288,856 homes partially damaged. The national economy was affected with erosion of the asset base of the people; houses, farm produce, livestock, latrines, drinking water sources, irrigation canals, access roads, health/education facilities, etc. In this context, a multi-sectoral needs assessment (MSNA) was conducted by Christian Aid (CAID) in four heavily damaged districts (Gorkha, Dhading, Dolakha and Sindhupalchowk) immediately after the earthquake. The MSNA followed the United Nations for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) guidelines and identified five priority sectors requiring the most support: Shelter Livelihood and Food security, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Education Gender Equality and Social Inclusion CAID responded to the aftermath of the earthquake through relief and recovery. The relief phase focused on providing immediate life-saving support; temporary shelters, safe drinking water, hygiene kits, temporary latrines, food basket for one-month period, and targeted trainings such as masonry and carpenters. In the recovery phase, CAID continued support to all four major sectors with the aim of strengthening the resilience of communities and institutions from the impact of natural disasters. Activities included housing support, prototype housing, winterisation kits, toilet support, school shelter, community and school water rehabilitation, cash grants, livelihood support such as goat, seeds, and rain water harvesting distribution were conducted. Method The evaluation used a range of qualitative and quantitative methods for data collection. Qualitative data was collected through focus group discussions (FGDs), key informant interviews (KIIs), in-depth interviews (IDI), case stories and observations of communities. Qualitative data collection questions were categorised by sector, and in line with the CHS commitments. Quantitative data was collected and analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). The analysis was mostly descriptive in nature, with percentages, mean and frequencies. Download the report above to read the full analysis and findings.

Virtuous Circle: scaling up investment in low carbon energy

This report demonstrates that the time for rapid deployment of renewable energy technologies is now. It shows that governments, policy makers and investors should realise that clean energy and clean energy investments are reliable, cost effective and scalable, and a solution for delivering clean and sustainable energy for all.

No more harmful traditional practices: working with faith leaders

In 2017 a consortium of members of the Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities (JLI) undertook a study funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), entitled ‘Working effectively with faith leaders to challenge harmful traditional practices'. The United Nations has defined harmful traditional practices (HTPs) as follows: Traditional cultural practices reflect values and beliefs held by members of a community for periods often spanning generations. Every social grouping in the world has specific traditional cultural practices and beliefs, some of which are beneficial to all members, while others are harmful to a specific group, such as women. These harmful traditional practices include female genital mutilation (FGM); forced feeding of women; early marriage; the various taboos or practices which prevent women from controlling their own fertility; nutritional taboos and traditional birth practices; son preference and its implications for the status of the girl child; female infanticide; early pregnancy; and dowry price. Despite their harmful nature and their violation of international human rights laws, such practices persist because they are not questioned and take on an aura of morality in the eyes of those practicing them. Faith leaders are men and women recognised by their faith community, both formally or informally, as playing authoritative and influential leadership roles within faith institutions to guide, inspire or lead others (of faith). This may be within a formal religious hierarchy of accountability, but also includes informal movements. This report serves as a synthesis of the study findings.

Maximising the benefits of the global phase-down of hydrofluorocarbons

This paper, published for the 30th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol, discusses what is at stake in the implementation of the HFCs phase-down and related activities. It describes a suite of measures that, if taken together, will maximise the benefits of the phase-down of HFC refrigerants with high global warming potential, both in terms of the greenhouse gas emissions, and additional, sustainable development co-benefits. Summary The proliferation of household air conditioners and refrigerators across the world, including the rapid growth expected in developing countries, gives us an opportunity, right now, to ensure that the appliances we choose have minimum impact on the global climate and maximise sustainable development.  Last year’s hard-won Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol ensured a commitment to remove HFC refrigerants with high global warming potential, through a global phase-down. Maximising the climate change and related benefits of this phase-down will depend on three elements coming together:  countries choosing refrigerants with the lowest global warming potentials  ensuring promotion of the most energy efficient cooling technologies  a rapid move to renewable energy to power these appliances. The right combination of these three elements will ensure that greenhouse gas emissions over the lifetime of each appliance are minimised.   Minimising greenhouse gas emissions Achieving each of these elements will require a range of actions, including addressing financing and cost issues, supporting capacity building and training, developing energy infrastructure plans and updating safety and energy efficiency standards. These diverse actions will need to be coordinated strategically, often across a number of distinct but critical venues, including the Montreal Protocol, the UNFCCC, various regional groups and domestic policy-making.  As we implement both the Montreal Protocol Kigali Amendment and the Paris Agreement, making the right coordinated and complementary decisions across these issues and venues will be essential to deliver a safe world with below 1.5C of global warming.

Power analysis: A learning review

This learning review explores how power analysis is integrated in Christian Aid resilience programmes funded by CHASE and General PPAs 2011-2016.

Picture Power: ECRP Malawi

Developed by Christian Aid, Picture Power uses participatory photography to provide communities with the skills and equipment to conduct their own project evaluation, most recently on our ECRP programme in Malawi. ECRP Picture Power project

Gender Analysis of Village Savings and Loans (ECRP)

Womens’ empowerment is a slow and incremental process, in which village and savings loan groups (VSL) can play a crucial role. In order to understand the impact of gender relations on VSL interventions, and vice-versa, focusing on the perceptions of men and women participating in VSL, household decision-making, and women’s access and control of VSL resources, Christian Aid commissioned a Gender and Power Analysis of VSL within ECRP. The study consists of a literature and document review, and primary qualitative research with 330 participants (191 women and 139 men) in 5 ECRP intervention districts; Kasungu, Mwanza, Mulanje, Nsanje, and Machinga. The analysis will progress by examining the influence of gender dynamics on VSL, and VSL on gender dynamics, relating to the woman herself, her household, the intervention, and the wider community.