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Racing to End Poverty

The global impact of Covid-19 adversely affected programme delivery across the world in 2020. However, despite the negative impact of the pandemic, the worsening security situation and dwindling donor funding, Christian Aid Nigeria made giant strides in d

Thank you For the Rain - watch party and screening resource

The Thank You For The Rain documentary film is a great way to explore, facilitate discussions, and empower young people to act on issues of global social justice. Our Watch Party and Screening Guide helps you set up an engaging event.

Identifying the most vulnerable

Following the Corona Virus Global Pandemic, Christian Aid is responding to a DFID call to support preparedness and response to primary and secondary impacts of COVID-19 on the most vulnerable Households (HHs) and communities in Benue, Borno and Kaduna states. This is a five-month rapid response project funded by DFID and being implemented by Christian Aid Nigeria and Afghanistan through local partners.

Agriculture scorecard

A report which assess the issues and recommendations, and checks whether they've been implemented by the MDAs.

National Revenue Authority scorecard

A report which assess the issues and recommendations, and checks whether they've been implemented by the MDAs.

Health scorecard

A report which assess the issues and recommendations, and checks whether they've been implemented by the MDAs.

Education scorecard

A report which assess the issues and recommendations, and checks whether they've been implemented by the MDAs.

Understanding change and peacebuilding in a Colombian human rights NGO

REL Practice Paper 2 This paper looks at the Theory of Change of the Inter-Church Justice and Peace Commission (CIJP), a human rights NGO and long-term partner of Christian Aid Colombia. It offers a window into understanding how an organisation set up to respond to a violent conflict perceives change in its own role as the conflict itself changes.  The paper traces shifts in CIJP’s relationship with the state, with communities, with its allies in civil society and with the private sector, and the strategies and interventions it now uses to work towards mobilised communities, an operational rule of law, and a democracy based on justice and peace. As well as documenting its current ToC, the paper proposes to Christian Aid and CIJP an approach that could be used to track future shifts to build up a detailed, long-term picture of the strategic evolution of a CSO in a shifting political context.   Author: Rosemary McGee

Balancing research and practice in an international NGO

REL Practice Paper 1 Ten Years of Change is a collaborative, long-term practitioner research initiative designed to take place in three countries – Colombia, Kenya and the UK. It is implemented by the Research, Evidence and Learning team at Christian Aid. The research began with the overarching question how are community members and supporters being influenced by, and influencing, processes of social change? Each country team adapted the question to make it relevant to their socio-political context, and designed research at several different levels, from local to national. This paper tells the story of the first three years of Ten Years of Change. It narrates our ideas and ambitions and how we clarified them; how we identified where, by whom and how the study would be implemented; and how we worked with colleagues in other countries to begin to translate our idea into practice. It then discusses the forces that shaped the parallel but distinct evolution of each of the three streams of the study, before reflecting on the challenges of trade-offs and power. It concludes by returning to some of our assumptions about practitioner research, reflecting on how they played out in practice, finally turning to considerations for the next stage of the study.  

Circle the City 2020 London A4 poster

Download and print off this poster to advertise the 2020 London Circle the City event.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Myanmar)

This Myanmar-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Climate migration in the Dry Corridor of Central America

This study examines the relationship between three factors – migration, gender and climate change – in the Central American Dry Corridor (Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua). Although there is a vast body of literature that addreses each of these factors individually, other studies have not looked at the links between the three. This report is divided into four sections. The first provides the background and context of the Dry Corridor in order to explain why the variables analysed were chosen. The second includes the main testimonies gathered in each of the countries during the fieldwork. The third sets out the main conclusions, and the final section includes a series of recommendations for the inclusion of a gender equality perspective in public policies on climate change.

Migraciones climáticas en el Corredor Seco Centroamericano

This is the orignial Spanish version of a study that examines the relationship between three factors – migration, gender and climate change – in the Central American Dry Corridor (Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua). Although there is a vast body of literature that addreses each of these factors individually, other studies have not looked at the links between the three. This report is divided into four sections. The first provides the background and context of the Dry Corridor in order to explain why the variables analysed were chosen. The second includes the main testimonies gathered in each of the countries during the fieldwork. The third sets out the main conclusions, and the final section includes a series of recommendations for the inclusion of a gender equality perspective in public policies on climate change.

Scotland Annual Review 2019

Scotland annual review 2019

STAR Ghana Foundation annual report 2019

STAR Ghana delivers transformational change that advances democracy, accountability and social inclusion. What we have done We have supported civil society organisations through grants and technical assistance, and convened meetings and discussions. We have launched major funding calls on gender equality and social inclusion, media, anti-corruption and local governance, and supported work under strategic opportunity calls. We enabled 87 civil society organisations to mobilise and support citizens to take action around issues such as inclusive access to quality public goods and services, tackling corruption, and promoting good governance. With support from our grant partners, more than 5 million citizens have engaged with duty bearers at all levels of governance, including Parliament, district assemblies and traditional authorities. 'STAR Ghana is helping citizens and civil society organisations to become more active and informed, able to speak up and engage constructively with duty bearers at all levels.' We have seen these institutions respond and deliver. The work we support has led to more inclusion and accountability – and real improvements in people’s lives. At the same time, it has given citizens new knowledge, new ideas and greater confidence, enabling them and their organisations to apply their learning to other issues and areas. Lessons and challenges To make sure lessons were learned from the work, we have worked with stakeholders to reflect on their experiences and gather findings. We have compiled and shared key learning documents. A new foundation We have paved the way for transition to the STAR Ghana Foundation, a new national Ghanaian entity, which was successfully launched in November 2018. Our achievements are all the more remarkable for taking place in a difficult context of growing inequality, and dwindling funding for civil society organisations and questions around their legitimacy and impact. We have responded to these challenges. As Ghana undergoes much-needed economic development, it is important that it doesn’t come at the cost of equality, but also delivers for vulnerable people including women, children and people with disabilities. Civil society can drive this debate and amplify the voice of the marginalised. All of us at the STAR Ghana Foundation thank you for your active support and look forward to working with you in bringing about transformational change towards an equitable and prosperous Ghana. Dr Esther Ofei-Aboagye, Chair, Governing Council, STAR Ghana Foundation

Baseline Survey of Early Warning and Early Response Systems

This report is a baseline survey on the early warning and early response systems in Benue, Kaduna and Plateau States. It explains the capacity and resources available and how the project can support and strengthen the different state structures to be better responsive to any disaster especially flooding.

Keeping hope alive: Christian Aid's work on peace - Impact study 2019

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This Impact Study, and accompanying case studies, share some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Key facts In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the Sustainable Development Goals – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. (OECD). Violent conflict has spiked since 2010, with two billion people now living in countries where development outcomes are affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (World Bank, 2018). Much of this violence is due to recurring violence and protracted conflicts. It is estimated that 135 different countries have experienced conflict recurrence – a pattern that is deepening. We stand in solidarity with our local partners – households, community organisations and local leadership who live through conflict and violence first hand. We want governments, faith institutions and communities to want and work for peace in their societies and to keep hope alive. Peace is not something fluffy and aspirational. Peacebuilding can and does work.