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Evidence Report: Project Maria Caicedo

Development of inclusive markets to build peace in Colombia. The case of the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tulua.

Informe de evidencia: Proyecto María Caicedo

Desarrollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia. El caso de las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá

Desarollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia

Colombia es el mayor productor de hoja de coca del mundo. Desde el 2000, Estados Unidos ha asignado 10.000 millones de dólares en un intento por detener su producción, y se han fumigado más de 1,6 millones de hectáreas en un intento por erradicar las plantaciones de coca. Sin embargo, la superficie cultivada en el país ha aumentado en un promedio de 45% por año - con 177.000 hectáreas en 2017 que se utilizan para el cultivo de coca. Como es evidente, la lucha contra las drogas ha fracasado. Trabajando en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá, el Proyecto María Caicedo trabaja para la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz. El proyecto se diseñó para captar la voz de los que quedaron atrás (a través de los años de conflicto en Colombia, y por los esfuerzos subsiguientes para traer la paz) y se involucraron en las economías ilegales en la Colombia rural. Esta investigación proporcionó elementos clave para contribuir a la construcción de paz en Colombia a través de la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina (ZRC). Adoptamos un enfoque sistémico, que involucra los sistemas políticos y económicos a nivel local y nacional, buscando dar a las personas más marginadas una voz y, en última instancia, poder para salir de la pobreza. Estos informes, tanto en inglés como en español, muestran los resultados de nuestra investigación y cómo Colombia puede avanzar hacia economías de paz. Este reporte muestra un resumen de los resultados del Proyecto. Para leer el reporte completo, haga clic aquí. 

Development of Inclusive Markets to Build Peace in Colombia

Colombia is the largest producer of coca leaf in the world. Since 2000, United States has allocated USD 10 billion in an attempt to stop its production, with more than 1.6 million hectares being sprayed in an attempt to eradicate coca plantations. But the cultivated area in the country has increased by an average of 45% per year – with 177,000 hectares in 2017 being used for growing coca. As is evident, the fight against drugs has failed. Working in the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tuluá, Project Maria Caicedo works towards the transformation of war economies into peace economies. The project was designed to capture the voice of those left behind (through the years of conflict in Colombia, and by the subsequent efforts to bring peace) and involved in illegal economies in the rural Colombia. This research provided key building blocks in the foundation of peace in Colombia through the transformation of war economies to peace economies in Peasant Reserve Areas (ZRC, by its acronym in Spanish). We  took a systemic approach, which involved the political and economic systems at the local and national levels, seeking to give the most marginalised people a voice and ultimately power to emerge from poverty. This report gives a summary of the project's findings. For the full report, click here.

Use and abuse of tax breaks: how tax incentives become harmful

Taxation is essential to raise sufficient, equitable and accountable financing for development. Only through taxation can governments fund public spending on the essential services at the quality and scale necessary to realise the rights of all citizens. Yet many Southern governments decide not to tax certain corporations and companies in the hope that this will attract cross-border investment. Despite mounting evidence that the practice of offering tax incentives is both largely ineffective and detrimental to development, it is widespread. This report explains how tax incentives can become harmful, and discusses what can be done to stop their abuse.

Adapta annual report 2017

Adaptation is the answer to climate change: cocoa, honey and the future. Proyecto Adapta: “Building climatic resilience in the fine cocoa and honey sectors” is a 4-year project, driven by the Nicaraguan firm of Danish origin Ingemann, and developed jointly with government organizati ons, the Humboldt Centre in Nicaragua and the international organisati on Christian Aid. Its realisation is possible thanks to finance from the International Development Bank, Multi lateral Investment Bank and the Nordic Bank for Development.

Adapta interactive annual report 2017

Adaptation is the answer to climate change: cocoa, honey and the future. Proyecto Adapta: “Building climatic resilience in the fine cocoa and honey sectors” is a 4-year project, driven by the Nicaraguan firm of Danish origin Ingemann, and developed jointly with government organizati ons, the Humboldt Centre in Nicaragua and the international organisati on Christian Aid. Its realisation is possible thanks to finance from the International Development Bank, Multi lateral Investment Bank and the Nordic Bank for Development.

Questionable Values? Policy Report

Why we believe that it is time to stop defending the indefensible across all the world’s tax havens. Following the hurricanes Irma and Maria that devastated a number of Caribbean islands in September this year, the focus has rightly been on supporting the hardest hit and those in greatest need. But as the rebuilding effort develops, many are starting to think more deeply about the long-term sustainability of these islands’ economies, and their ability to protect and provide for their populations in an economically and climatically uncertain future. What type of jobs, and what type of economy, should places such as the British Virgin Islands (BVI) be looking to build? This is a question that extends beyond the storm-hit Caribbean. Defensive measures against tax evasion and avoidance are on the rise in the US, the EU and emerging economies, driven in part by the exposure of these activities in successive leaks of information (most recently, the Paradise Papers). Such developments call into question the sustainability of any economic model that relies on providing various combinations of secrecy and low taxation. So far, many small offshore centres, and their supporters, have largely reacted defensively to the threat of change, arguing that media coverage has unfairly maligned ‘tax havens’; that the problem is not as large as portrayed; and that they are already instituting tax and transparency standards better than many large ‘onshore’ economies. However, careful scrutiny of one of the most comprehensive efforts to explain the role of international finance centres and to illustrate the impact that such a territory has on the global economy – the prominent report that the government-backed financial lobby group, BVI Finance, commissioned this year from consultancy firm Capital Economics – demonstrates major weaknesses in the arguments and conclusions presented, and suggests to us that such defences are more concerned with maintaining the status quo than a genuine concern for the wider global economy. Our analysis of the Capital Economics report is an example of why we believe that it is time to stop defending the indefensible across all the world’s tax havens. With public demand building for new regulation, and the ever-present threat of further mass leaks, the UK Government needs to initiate a serious discussion about alternative economic pathways for the British Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies. Alternative futures for offshore tax havens are not only vital for the poorest countries of the world that lose tax revenues each year to the offshore system, but also for the ordinary women and men in places like the BVI, for whom a secure future is dependent on the creation of robust, equitable and sustainable economies.

Benefits? Tax Incentives in Latin America and the Caribbean (Spanish)

Overview of the use of tax incentives that analyses whether or not tax incentives bring benefits to countries and communities.(Spanish)

Malawi Pigeon Peas Policy Brief (2015)

A report on policy and structural arrangements affecting the global market opportunities for Malawi's pigeon peas and pigeon pea products.

Final evaluation of the LEARN project - Ghana

Action for Local Employment, Accountability and Resource Mobilisation (LEARN) was an EU-funded project in Ghana implemented by Christian Aid and its partners.The overall objective was to support actions aimed at promoting an inclusive and empowered Ghana.Action for Local Employment, Accountability and Resource Mobilisation (LEARN) was an EU-funded project in Ghana by Christian Aid and its partners.This report presents the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the project’s final evaluation.

Taxing men and women: why gender is crucial for a fair tax system (report)

This paper aims to stimulate debate and offer guidance to those attempting a gender analysis of their own tax system.