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'Where is Palestine?' - report

Read the newly published report by our Head of Middle East Policy & Advocacy.

A Rights-Based Economy Report

The COVID-19 pandemic has shone a spotlight on the fundamental injustice at the core of our current economic model, which results in scarcity for the many, and unimaginable wealth for the few. The economic fallout from the pandemic and the inadequacy of governments’ responses to it are prompting more and more people to question the morality of an economic system which for decades has placed the market at the centre of all human interactions, measuring progress and development solely in terms of economic growth. In this publication, the Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR) and Christian Aid – two international organisations working for human rights and economic justice – ask: what would it would look like if we had an economy based on human rights?

Evidence Report: Project Maria Caicedo

Development of inclusive markets to build peace in Colombia. The case of the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tulua.

Informe de evidencia: Proyecto María Caicedo

Desarrollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia. El caso de las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá

Desarollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia

Colombia es el mayor productor de hoja de coca del mundo. Desde el 2000, Estados Unidos ha asignado 10.000 millones de dólares en un intento por detener su producción, y se han fumigado más de 1,6 millones de hectáreas en un intento por erradicar las plantaciones de coca. Sin embargo, la superficie cultivada en el país ha aumentado en un promedio de 45% por año - con 177.000 hectáreas en 2017 que se utilizan para el cultivo de coca. Como es evidente, la lucha contra las drogas ha fracasado. Trabajando en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá, el Proyecto María Caicedo trabaja para la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz. El proyecto se diseñó para captar la voz de los que quedaron atrás (a través de los años de conflicto en Colombia, y por los esfuerzos subsiguientes para traer la paz) y se involucraron en las economías ilegales en la Colombia rural. Esta investigación proporcionó elementos clave para contribuir a la construcción de paz en Colombia a través de la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina (ZRC). Adoptamos un enfoque sistémico, que involucra los sistemas políticos y económicos a nivel local y nacional, buscando dar a las personas más marginadas una voz y, en última instancia, poder para salir de la pobreza. Estos informes, tanto en inglés como en español, muestran los resultados de nuestra investigación y cómo Colombia puede avanzar hacia economías de paz. Este reporte muestra un resumen de los resultados del Proyecto. Para leer el reporte completo, haga clic aquí. 

Development of Inclusive Markets to Build Peace in Colombia

Colombia is the largest producer of coca leaf in the world. Since 2000, United States has allocated USD 10 billion in an attempt to stop its production, with more than 1.6 million hectares being sprayed in an attempt to eradicate coca plantations. But the cultivated area in the country has increased by an average of 45% per year – with 177,000 hectares in 2017 being used for growing coca. As is evident, the fight against drugs has failed. Working in the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tuluá, Project Maria Caicedo works towards the transformation of war economies into peace economies. The project was designed to capture the voice of those left behind (through the years of conflict in Colombia, and by the subsequent efforts to bring peace) and involved in illegal economies in the rural Colombia. This research provided key building blocks in the foundation of peace in Colombia through the transformation of war economies to peace economies in Peasant Reserve Areas (ZRC, by its acronym in Spanish). We  took a systemic approach, which involved the political and economic systems at the local and national levels, seeking to give the most marginalised people a voice and ultimately power to emerge from poverty. This report gives a summary of the project's findings. For the full report, click here.

Trapped in illicit finance

The world faces some of the most serious economic, environmental, social and political challenges it ever has. Across the world, citizens are calling for governments to implement policies to address these issues. Again, and again, governments tell them the same thing: “we don’t have the money”. At the same time, it’s a fact that governments worldwide tolerate widespread tax evasion and avoidance – and that malevolent actors routinely steal from government funds. Indeed, it is estimated that $416bn is lost every year to illicit financial flows (IFFs) – illegal or harmful movements of money or capital from one country to another. In this report, Christian Aid and our partners propose a simple solution for plugging some of this funding gap: we must stop tolerating the abusive, unethical and immoral IFFs that rob the poor to enrich the wealthy.

Corporate approaches to addressing modern day slavery

Download this report providing a snapshot of corporate approaches to modern day slavery based on research of 21 leading brands and retailers. From the Ethical Trading Initiative and The Ashridge Centre for Business and Sustainability at Hult International Business School.

Tackling modern day slavery - the John Lewis Partnership

Download this report from the John Lewis Partnership outlining their business and human rights strategy in response to the Modern Slavery Act. From the Salt Business Network. 

The new global debt crisis

Spiralling debt repayments divert precious resources from governments that can ill afford to spare them. Without spending money on basic services like clean water, sanitation and health, there is little hope of poor countries meeting the development need, and human rights, of their citizens.  This report explores the current debt crisis, its risks, and ways to tackle it. Produced as part of the Citizens for Financial Justice project

No Exceptions: Why HSBC's new coal policy could fuel climate change

In order to stop climate change from hurting the world’s poor, we need to stop new fossil fuel infrastructure, especially coal, from being built. Finance from banks has helped build new coal plants, when it should be going to underfunded renewable projects. This report looks at the new energy policy from HSBC. It asks why the bank has omitted Vietnam, Bangladesh and Indonesia from its ban on coal financing, when other banks like Standard Chartered have ruled out coal financing in all countries.

Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management

Governance, gender, peace building and human rights Tackling the problems of poverty, vulnerability and exclusion that persist in parts of the world that continue to be affected by violence or political insecurity is difficult for several reasons. For one, because of the complexity of the prevailing social, economic and political systems, solutions to chronic problems are far from obvious. One response to this aspect of the challenge is adaptive programme design and management. This paper, 'Learning to make a difference: Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management in governance, gender, peace building and human rights', is the product of a multi-year collaboration between ODI and the core team of Christian Aid Ireland to assess the relevance of adaptive or trial-and-error approaches to the field of governance, peace building and human rights. It explains the basis on which Christian Aid Ireland’s current five-year programme funded by Irish Aid has become committed to an adaptive approach. It then describes and seeks to draw lessons from the programme’s first year of experience, considering the possible implications for implementation over the coming years.

Adapta annual report 2017

Adaptation is the answer to climate change: cocoa, honey and the future. Proyecto Adapta: “Building climatic resilience in the fine cocoa and honey sectors” is a 4-year project, driven by the Nicaraguan firm of Danish origin Ingemann, and developed jointly with government organizati ons, the Humboldt Centre in Nicaragua and the international organisati on Christian Aid. Its realisation is possible thanks to finance from the International Development Bank, Multi lateral Investment Bank and the Nordic Bank for Development.

Adapta interactive annual report 2017

Adaptation is the answer to climate change: cocoa, honey and the future. Proyecto Adapta: “Building climatic resilience in the fine cocoa and honey sectors” is a 4-year project, driven by the Nicaraguan firm of Danish origin Ingemann, and developed jointly with government organizati ons, the Humboldt Centre in Nicaragua and the international organisati on Christian Aid. Its realisation is possible thanks to finance from the International Development Bank, Multi lateral Investment Bank and the Nordic Bank for Development.

Doing Accountability Differently - Voice to the People, Nigeria

Exploring practice and results of Christian Aid’s Voice to the People Programme in Anambra State, Nigeria. Enhancing accountable governance has long been a major concern of development programming, but matching this interest with change that is both sustainable and replicable at multiple levels has not been easily achieved. Recent studies suggest that accountability initiatives will only work if they take local power relations into account, and that the limited traction attained to date could be kick-started with a strategy geared towards vertically integrated accountability. To that end, Voice to the People (V2P) has taken a power-aware approach that enabled collaboration amongst community-level, local government and state-level actors and vertical integration of advances at each stage, making it an instructive case study for replicating and scaling up effective accountability programming. Drawing on focus groups and interviews with key informants and a review of project documents, this paper reflects on the lessons that can be learned from V2P, a programme funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and implemented by Christian Aid in partnership with local organisations in Anambra State, Nigeria.

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 1)

In this policy briefing, Christian Aid examines the links between climate change and conflict, and begins to elaborate on its argument that the best form of climate security is climate justice.