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Budget Credibility Report

This revenue and expenditure credibility analysis is designed to provide Sierra Leoneans, the Government of Sierra Leone (GoSL), development partners and other stakeholders with a full picture of revenue and expenditure in 2017, 2018 and 2019. Various Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment reports (2010, 2014, and 2018) have highlighted the challenges in implementing a credible budget in Sierra Leone. The aim is to highlight performance against the budget at the total and sector level, to draw out some of the reasons behind this, and identify the impacts on public service delivery. The assessment will assist government in addressing some of the challenges that are adversely affecting budget credibility. It will also provide a basis for dialogue between civil society, Parliament, development partners and the GoSL regarding its public financial management reform strategy (2018 – 2021) and delivery of the National Development Plan.

June 2020, Sierra Leone Anti-Corruption Court Monitoring Report

To help strengthen the fight against corruption, an Anti-Corruption Division of the High Court has been established. Pursuant to a Constitutional Instrument dated 4th April 2019, the court is mandated to hear and determine all anti-corruption matters instituted by the Anti-Corruption Commission. The new division, which is expected to be a model court for criminal cases, was set up as part of efforts to address some of the traditional challenges that confront the criminal justice system. These include undue delays in proceedings, limited courtrooms, and integrity deficit among some administrative staff. As part of the efforts of the consortium to promote and strengthen the work of the Anti-Corruption Commission monitors the proceedings from this court and this report is the first from our monitoring of its proceedings. 

Corruption Perception Survey Report, 2019

This report – commissioned by the Centre for Accountability and Rule of Law (with funding from DFID and support from Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) - seeks a bottom-up account from the Sierra Leonean people regarding the status of corruption. It examines their perceptions about the fight against corruption; about the institutions involved; about the delivery of public services, and about their own roles and actions in relation to the fight against corruption. The study was conducted between September and November 2019. Three data streams were utilized: a literature review; a social survey where 2619 persons were interviewed in all 16 districts of the country; followed by in-depth interviews geared towards getting detailed insights from experts and practitioners regarding their observations and reactions to the findings of the social survey 

Cost of Corruption in Sierra Leone Report, 2019

Corruption happens underground and its damage and volume can be difficult to quantify. This report systematically presents data on the quantitative estimate of the cost of corruption that occurred between 2016 - 2018 – the period leading up to the 2018 general elections in Sierra Leone onto the transfer of power to the opposition. The Centre for Accountability and the Rule of Law (CARL), along with its project consortium partners (Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) commissioned this study to generate data which anti-corruption agencies and their partners could utilise to develop more effective tools to respond to and track progress in fighting corruption. Data was collected from ten sectors which form 72.5 percent of the economy. The sectors studied include agriculture, mining, energy, fishery, construction, banking, education, health, transport and communication

Tipping Point report

This report explores how the Covid-19 pandemic threatens to push the world's poorest to the brink of survival.

Christian Aid’s gender pay gap report 2019-2020

A 2-page report from our Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi. The report covers: A comparison of both the mean (average) and median (mid-point) in the hourly rate we paid to men and women on 5 April 2019 How our gender pay gap is driven, according to our analysis How our gender pay gap compares to organisations across the UK and within our sector What we're doing to address the gender pay gap at Christian Aid

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (English)

This paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Arabic)

This Arabic-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Nepali)

This Nepali-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Partnerships for humanitarian action: challenges for large INGOs

Read the notes from the January 2020 roundtable held to discuss the challenges for large INGOs without a traditional partnership approach. This paper contains: Notes from the roundtable, co-hosted by the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships programme and the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) of ODI, in January 2020. The roundtable aimed to discuss the challenges for large international NGOs, without a traditional partnership approach, moving towards partnerships in humanitarian contexts in pursuit of localisation.

Pathways to Localisation: locally-led humanitarian action (English)

This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action.  It is informed by more than 400 humanitarian agencies – the majority of them local and national organisations – through research, piloting and the development of National Localisation Frameworks, in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan.  It outlines priority actions and a range of indicators under the areas of partnerships, capacity, financial resources, and coordination.  This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page. Who is it for? This paper is relevant for all those implementing and funding humanitarian response. It was developed as part of the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project implemented by Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD and Oxfam, guided by national steering committees, and funded by the European Commission’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) over 2017-2019.

Vers la localisation (Pathways to localisation - French)

Cadre visant à une intervention humanitaire menée à l’échelle locale et fondée sur le partenariat. This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page. Note de synthèse  Le Sommet Humanitaire Mondial (WHS) de 2016 a souligné le rôle primordial des acteurs locaux et nationaux dans l’intervention humanitaire. Les trois grandes séries d’engagements qui y ont été prises, à savoir le Programme d’Action pour l’Humanité (2016), le Grand Compromis (2016) et la Charte pour le Changement (2015), ont énoncé les changements ou les transformations nécessaires pour permettre aux acteurs locaux et nationaux de prendre davantage les rênes de l’action humanitaire.   À l’initiative du consortium formé de Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD et Oxfam, Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships est un programme orienté par les acteurs locaux et nationaux qui siègent dans des comités nationaux de pilotage. La Protection Civile et Opérations d’Aide de la Commission Européenne (ECHO) l’a financé de la fin 2017 à 2019. Ce programme s’inspire de travaux du consortium qui depuis 2012, par le biais de la série de rapports Missed Opportunities, visent à renforcer le rôle moteur des acteurs locaux et nationaux dans l’action humanitaire.   À l’issue de ses recherches, le programme Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships a mis en évidence un modèle fondé sur les pratiques de partenariat qui, selon les acteurs locaux/nationaux, favorisent le plus la localisation4. Pour les besoins de ces travaux, plus de 350 organisations au Myanmar, au Népal, au Nigeria et au Soudan du Sud, dont 85 % sont des organisations locales et nationales, ont été consultées. Elles ont permis aux membres du consortium et à leurs partenaires locaux de repérer, de valider et d’expérimenter un certain nombre de recommandations. Les leçons tirées de la phase d’expérimentation ont été regroupées avec les conclusions des auto-évaluations des capacités de plus d’une centaine d’acteurs locaux et nationaux. Les recherches, les leçons et les conclusions du programme ont façonné l’élaboration de cadres nationaux de localisation. Les acteurs locaux et nationaux, et d’autres intervenants humanitaires, y compris des ONG internationales, des agences des Nations Unies, des donateurs, les sociétés de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge, et les autorités gouvernementales concernées y ont également contribué.   Les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation sont adaptés au contexte très différencié des environnements opérationnels et des crises humanitaires au Myanmar, au Népal, au Nigeria et au Soudan du Sud. Les écarts notables entre les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation sont présentés dans ce document et reflètent la diversité des contextes. Les différences tiennent particulièrement au rôle des autorités gouvernementales dans la localisation. Cependant, ces quatre cadres ont en commun un certain nombre d’actions et de domaines prioritaires, dont plusieurs sont étroitement liés aux engagements, aux cadres et aux indicateurs de localisation existants et cités en référence. Alors que le programme Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships était axé sur l’action humanitaire fondée sur le partenariat, les cadres nationaux de localisation sont allés bien au-delà. Ce rapport présente les principaux domaines traités dans les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation, ainsi que leurs objectifs, leurs actions prioritaires et leurs indicateurs potentiels.  Note d’orientation sur les pratiques de partenariat en vue de la localisation.

Caminos hacia la localización (Pathways to localisation - Spanish)

Un marco para la respuesta de acción humanitariadirigida localmente en una acción basada en la asociación. This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page.   Resumen ejecutivo  El papel esencial de los actores locales y nacionales en la respuesta humanitaria se resaltó en la Cumbre Mundial Humanitaria (‘World Humanitarian Summit’) de 2016. Los cambios o transformaciones necesarias para que los actores locales y nacionales puedan asumir un mayor liderazgo en la acción humanitaria se esbozaron en los tres grandes conjuntos de compromisos aprobados en la cumbre: Agenda para la Humanidad (2016), el Gran Acuerdo (2016), y El Estatuto para el Cambio (2015). Acelerar la Localización a través de las Asociaciones es un programa de consorcio de Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD, Oxfam y guiado por actores locales y nacionales en los comités directivos nacionales. Está financiado por la Oficina Europea de Ayuda Humanitaria y Protección Civil (ECHO) de la Comisión Europea desde finales de 2017 hasta 2019. Este programa se ha basado en el trabajo ya realizado por el consorcio con el objetivo de fortalecer el liderazgo de los actores locales y nacionales en la acción humanitaria desde 2012 a través de la serie de trabajos Missed Opportunities.  El programa Acelerar la Localización a través de las Asociaciones llevó a cabo una investigación para identificar un modelo de asociación que consiste en prácticas de asociación que los actores locales/nacionales consideran más propicias para la localización4. Esta investigación consultó a más de 350 organizaciones en Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria y Sudán del Sur - 85% de las cuales eran organizaciones locales y nacionales - y las recomendaciones fueron identificadas, validadas y probadas por los miembros del consorcio y los socios locales. Las enseñanzas de la fase piloto se cotejaron con las conclusiones de las autoevaluaciones de la capacidad de más de 100 agentes locales y nacionales. La investigación, el aprendizaje y los resultados del programa sirvieron de base para el desarrollo de los marcos nacionales de localización con las contribuciones de los actores locales y nacionales y otras partes interesadas en la ayuda humanitaria, incluidas las ONG internacionales, los organismos de las Naciones Unidas, los donantes, las sociedades de la Cruz/Media Luna Roja y las autoridades gubernamentales pertinentes.  Los cuatro marcos nacionales de localización se adaptan al contexto específico de los muy diferentes entornos operativos y crisis humanitarias en Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria y Sudán del sur. Las notables diferencias entre los cuatro marcos nacionales de localización se esbozan en este documento y reflejan los diversos contextos; difieren particularmente en relación con el papel de las autoridades gubernamentales en la localización.  Sin embargo, hay una serie de acciones y áreas prioritarias comunes a los cuatro marcos, muchas de las cuales están estrechamente relacionadas con los compromisos, marcos e indicadores de localización existentes a los que se hace referencia. Aunque el objetivo de Acelerar la Localización a través de las Asociaciones era la acción humanitaria basada en las asociaciones, los marcos nacionales de localización han ido más allá. Las áreas clave incluidas en los cuatro marcos nacionales de localización se describen en el documento, junto con los objetivos, las acciones prioritarias y los indicadores potenciales.  Prácticas de las asociaciones para la localización; una nota de orientación

Christian Aid Ethiopia Annual Report 2018/19

This report shows the impact of our work and testimonies that show how Christian Aid Ethiopia is supporting the most vulnerable communities in hard to reach parts of the country. It highlights out work on humanitarian response, DRR, strengthening climate services to farmers and pastoral communities, markets development and our work on promoting gender sensitive programming and support to communities to challenge power structures and systems that perpetuate gender violence. 

Keeping hope alive: internal investment fund review 2017-18

In 2015, Christian Aid established an internal investment fund to encourage a more specific focus on tackling violence and building peace, in line with the organisation’s strategic objectives.   This has involved:  four annual rounds of funding to date £400,000–£500,000 allocated to the fund each year projects supported in 16 countries, with budgets of £20,000–£100,000 projects funded subject to a competitive selection process. This review is part of a collection of content - 'Keeping hope alive'. Download the review above or view the full report here Context In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the international community for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. This rise in violence has been accompanied by a global undermining of civil society space and an increase in attacks on those at the frontline of protecting human rights and calling for peace locally, with more than 300 murdered in 2017. It is clear that peacebuilding efforts are off course and that development and faith-based actors have a role to play in changing violence to peace.  

Christian Aid Nigeria Annual Report 2018

The very latest updates and information from our country programme in Nigeria

E4E Nigeria project: Benue State Contingency Plan 2019-2020

Coordinating Humanitarian and Emergency Response The Benue State contingency plan was developed in partnership with the state government through its Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) and the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA). It identifies and defines the conditions necessary for emergency actions by SEMA as the coordinating agency in emergencies at the state and all relevant stakeholders. This one-year plan has been developed to provide a basis for coordination of humanitarian response by the Benue State Government of Nigeria in the event of a major/catastrophic disaster within the period of 2019 and 2020. The plan will be delivered through the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA). This document adopts the multi-risk approach and identifies flood, epidemic, drought, crises and terrorism as probable disasters that can cause high level impact and displacement of persons.  

E4E Nigeria project: Kaduna State Contingency Plan 2019-2020

Coordinating Humanitarian and Emergency Response This contingency plan was compiled collaboratively by stakeholders in emergency and humanitarian response in Kaduna State. The intention for this document is to have clearly outlined responsibilities and roles in case of an emergency and to initiate emergency measures and procedures to reduce the risk of loss of life and property, damage resulting from an emergency. This Contingency plan has been developed to provide a basis for coordination of humanitarian response in the event of a major/catastrophic disaster for the initial 10 days by the state government through the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) for 2019-2020. This document adopts the multi-risk approach and identified flood, fire outbreak, epidemic, communal clashes, and terrorism as probable disasters that can cause high level impact and displacement of persons. A population of 20,000 was used as the benchmark for planning assumptions. The geographical area covered the state based on identified hazards. Meteorological predictions, monitoring of dams as well as socio and ethno-religious crises mentioned by relevant agencies were used as the basis for early warnings and triggers for the probability of occurrence of the identified disasters.