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Christian Aid in the Philippines: an exit learning review

Building climate resilience and strengthening civil society

Health Facility Assessment Report

How prepared is our healthcare system for the COVID-19 pandemic? Existing health care delivery system both in the public and private sectors were assessed through a survey labelled Health Facilities Assessment (HFA). This survey was conducted by Christian Aid partners and led by Christian Aid Nigeria in three states across 12 Local Government Areas (LGAs). The objective of the survey was to assess the existing health services profile, physical infrastructure, equipment/supplies, human resources, auxiliary services and quality of health services been rendered to the communities. This is a five-month project funded by DFID and being implemented by Christian Aid Nigeria and Afghanistan through local partners. In Nigeria the intervention is implemented by a local consortium led by Christian Aid Nigeria and four local partners: Mercy Vincent Foundation (MVF) and Ekklisiyar Yan’Uwa ‘a Nigeria (Church of the Brethren in Nigeria) leading project activities in Borno state, Legal Awareness for Nigerian Women (LANW) is leading activities in Kaduna state while Community Links and Human Empowerment Initiative (CLHEI) is responsible for Benue state.

Equality at All Levels report

A report from Christian Aid calling for faith actors and secular feminists to join forces to push for global equality for women.

Rising water and damaged livelihoods in Myanmar

Some areas of Kayin State, like many areas in Myanmar, are prone to flooding during monsoon season. However, in August of 2019, extreme weather caused unseen severe flooding in southern Myanmar.  Shortly after the flooding, Karen Baptist Convention (KBC) managed to carry out a rapid needs assessment and place a team of volunteers in the area. Partnership with Christian Aid and funding from Start Network allowed KBC to scale up their limited initial response and meet the critical food and water and sanitation needs of 3000 households. 

Christian Aid Ethiopia Annual Report 2018/19

This report shows the impact of our work and testimonies that show how Christian Aid Ethiopia is supporting the most vulnerable communities in hard to reach parts of the country. It highlights out work on humanitarian response, DRR, strengthening climate services to farmers and pastoral communities, markets development and our work on promoting gender sensitive programming and support to communities to challenge power structures and systems that perpetuate gender violence. 

Resilience Results: BRACED final evaluation report

Using evidence provided by implementing partners, this latest evaluation report from the BRACED Knowledge Manager examines the following central synthesis evaluation question: How, where, when and why do BRACED interventions work, and what can be learned/how can good practice be replicated? This paper finds that BRACED projects have made considerable progress towards building and strengthening resilience despite the short time-frame of the programme (3 years). The evidence presented in the BRACED project final evaluations which fed into this realist analysis highlight a number of valuable insights into how good practice, demonstrated by the projects, can be replicated. Read the report here

DEC Collective Learning Initiative

Nepal was shocked by a 7.8 magnitude earthquake on 25th of April 2015 and then after seventeen days another 7.3 magnitude rocked the country, exacerbating the humanitarian situation and reinforcing an already chaotic situation. This resulted in the death of approximately 9,000 individuals, impacting 8.1 million people by causing widespread displacement and destruction of homes, infrastructure and services. Numerous actors were involved in the response and recovery from local communities, national NGOs, the Nepal Army and Police, Government of Nepal, Red Cross and Red Crescent movement, foreign militaries, and international NGOs. To meet the devastation of the two earthquakes, there was a massive response; however, there were also challenges to reach the most vulnerable and those most in need.

Adapta annual report 2017

Adaptation is the answer to climate change: cocoa, honey and the future. Proyecto Adapta: “Building climatic resilience in the fine cocoa and honey sectors” is a 4-year project, driven by the Nicaraguan firm of Danish origin Ingemann, and developed jointly with government organizati ons, the Humboldt Centre in Nicaragua and the international organisati on Christian Aid. Its realisation is possible thanks to finance from the International Development Bank, Multi lateral Investment Bank and the Nordic Bank for Development.

Adapta interactive annual report 2017

Adaptation is the answer to climate change: cocoa, honey and the future. Proyecto Adapta: “Building climatic resilience in the fine cocoa and honey sectors” is a 4-year project, driven by the Nicaraguan firm of Danish origin Ingemann, and developed jointly with government organizati ons, the Humboldt Centre in Nicaragua and the international organisati on Christian Aid. Its realisation is possible thanks to finance from the International Development Bank, Multi lateral Investment Bank and the Nordic Bank for Development.

LPRR final evaluation report

The Linking Preparedness, Response and Resilience (LPRR) project, which is part of the DFID funded Disasters Emergencies Preparedness Programme (DEPP), was carried out from 2015 to the end of March 2018. The project was delivered by a consortium led by Christian Aid, which included Action Aid, Concern, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Safer World, and World Vision. The LPRR project brings together the expertise of response and resilience professionals (and frameworks) in order to support communities affected by emergencies and at the risk of violence. The consortium was present through a research component in eight countries, namely Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Philippines, Colombia, Indonesia, with pilot projects in Kenya, Pakistan and Myanmar. The project was delivered through three distinct strands: conflict prevention, humanitarian response, and learning.

Rohingya Crisis response update, April 2018

Christian Aid and its partners have been supporting communities displaced by violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine State, and Rohingya refugees who have crossed the border into Bangladesh. This comprehensive update, from our dedicated team on the ground, provides the very latest information on our response so far, the challenges we have faced and our plans for the way forward, as well as stories of survival from refugees.

Cox's Bazar April 2018

Christian Aid April 2018 activity report on Rohingya appeal from Cox's Bazar.

Nepal earthquake mid-term review

A mid-term review of Christian Aid's response to the Nepal earthquakes of 2015. Compiled by an independent assessor, this report includes key findings, recommendations, background and methodology. The management response and annexes can be found at the end of this document. This is an internal document, being shared for the benefit of others working on this response and to highlight key learnings and recommendations.  Summary The earthquakes of April and May 2015 had a devastating impact on the people of Nepal. According to the Nepal Government Ministry of Home Affairs, there were 8,891 fatalities, 22,302 injured, 604,930 homes destroyed, and a further 288,856 homes partially damaged. The national economy was affected with erosion of the asset base of the people; houses, farm produce, livestock, latrines, drinking water sources, irrigation canals, access roads, health/education facilities, etc. In this context, a multi-sectoral needs assessment (MSNA) was conducted by Christian Aid (CAID) in four heavily damaged districts (Gorkha, Dhading, Dolakha and Sindhupalchowk) immediately after the earthquake. The MSNA followed the United Nations for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) guidelines and identified five priority sectors requiring the most support: Shelter Livelihood and Food security, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Education Gender Equality and Social Inclusion CAID responded to the aftermath of the earthquake through relief and recovery. The relief phase focused on providing immediate life-saving support; temporary shelters, safe drinking water, hygiene kits, temporary latrines, food basket for one-month period, and targeted trainings such as masonry and carpenters. In the recovery phase, CAID continued support to all four major sectors with the aim of strengthening the resilience of communities and institutions from the impact of natural disasters. Activities included housing support, prototype housing, winterisation kits, toilet support, school shelter, community and school water rehabilitation, cash grants, livelihood support such as goat, seeds, and rain water harvesting distribution were conducted. Method The evaluation used a range of qualitative and quantitative methods for data collection. Qualitative data was collected through focus group discussions (FGDs), key informant interviews (KIIs), in-depth interviews (IDI), case stories and observations of communities. Qualitative data collection questions were categorised by sector, and in line with the CHS commitments. Quantitative data was collected and analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). The analysis was mostly descriptive in nature, with percentages, mean and frequencies. Download the report above to read the full analysis and findings.

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 1)

In this policy briefing, Christian Aid examines the links between climate change and conflict, and begins to elaborate on its argument that the best form of climate security is climate justice.

Appendices - Marsabit County Resilience Study

Appendices to the Marsabit County Resilience Study. A fieldwork study carried out over two weeks in May 2017 to assess the value of investing in resilience work within pastoralist communities. 

No more harmful traditional practices: working with faith leaders

In 2017 a consortium of members of the Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities (JLI) undertook a study funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), entitled ‘Working effectively with faith leaders to challenge harmful traditional practices'. The United Nations has defined harmful traditional practices (HTPs) as follows: Traditional cultural practices reflect values and beliefs held by members of a community for periods often spanning generations. Every social grouping in the world has specific traditional cultural practices and beliefs, some of which are beneficial to all members, while others are harmful to a specific group, such as women. These harmful traditional practices include female genital mutilation (FGM); forced feeding of women; early marriage; the various taboos or practices which prevent women from controlling their own fertility; nutritional taboos and traditional birth practices; son preference and its implications for the status of the girl child; female infanticide; early pregnancy; and dowry price. Despite their harmful nature and their violation of international human rights laws, such practices persist because they are not questioned and take on an aura of morality in the eyes of those practicing them. Faith leaders are men and women recognised by their faith community, both formally or informally, as playing authoritative and influential leadership roles within faith institutions to guide, inspire or lead others (of faith). This may be within a formal religious hierarchy of accountability, but also includes informal movements. This report serves as a synthesis of the study findings.