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Thank you For the Rain - watch party and screening resource

The Thank You For The Rain documentary film is a great way to explore, facilitate discussions, and empower young people to act on issues of global social justice. Our Watch Party and Screening Guide helps you set up an engaging event.

Counting the cost 2020: a year of climate breakdown

Identifying 15 of the most destructive climate disasters of the year.

Whose Green Recovery

A report outlining what a global green recovery would look like.

Black Lives Matter Everywhere

Apart from the Covid-19 pandemic, the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement has been one of the defining themes of 2020. Sparked by the death of George Floyd and other examples of police brutality in the United States, it quickly spread to include a wider debate about racial inequalities around the world. Climate change, although something which will affect us all, is a deeply racialised phenomenon. Black and brown people in the poorest countries face the brunt of the impacts, caused in large part by fossil fuel burning in rich, majority-White nations. But this inequality is often overlooked because climate change is associated with science and the language used to describe it is often technical jargon relating to atmospheric carbon atoms and global temperature readings. The cold neutrality of climate science obscures the fact that the drivers and impacts of the climate emergency are personal and societal, and tied to political decisions with clear racial implications. People in the, as-yet, more sheltered corners of the global North are now starting to experience the force of the climate crisis, but across the global South it is something they have already been feeling the effects of for years. Be they extreme weather events in Latin America, droughts in East Africa, floods in Bangladesh or sea level rise threatening the existence of Pacific Islands, climate change is not just a future threat but a present reality. Climate change and its disproportionate effects on those that have done the least to cause it has been known about for decades. And yet emissions continue to rise. If poor political decisions and unjust policies have helped to cause the climate crisis, then it’s equally the case that the right policies and decisions have an essential role to play in addressing the problem and putting the world on a path to climate justice. We’re beginning to see such movement, although not nearly fast enough. Politicians around the world have claimed to be moved by racial injustice. Making rapid and far reaching climate action a priority would be a good start in ensuring black lives matter everywhere.

Budget Credibility Report

This revenue and expenditure credibility analysis is designed to provide Sierra Leoneans, the Government of Sierra Leone (GoSL), development partners and other stakeholders with a full picture of revenue and expenditure in 2017, 2018 and 2019. Various Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment reports (2010, 2014, and 2018) have highlighted the challenges in implementing a credible budget in Sierra Leone. The aim is to highlight performance against the budget at the total and sector level, to draw out some of the reasons behind this, and identify the impacts on public service delivery. The assessment will assist government in addressing some of the challenges that are adversely affecting budget credibility. It will also provide a basis for dialogue between civil society, Parliament, development partners and the GoSL regarding its public financial management reform strategy (2018 – 2021) and delivery of the National Development Plan.

June 2020, Sierra Leone Anti-Corruption Court Monitoring Report

To help strengthen the fight against corruption, an Anti-Corruption Division of the High Court has been established. Pursuant to a Constitutional Instrument dated 4th April 2019, the court is mandated to hear and determine all anti-corruption matters instituted by the Anti-Corruption Commission. The new division, which is expected to be a model court for criminal cases, was set up as part of efforts to address some of the traditional challenges that confront the criminal justice system. These include undue delays in proceedings, limited courtrooms, and integrity deficit among some administrative staff. As part of the efforts of the consortium to promote and strengthen the work of the Anti-Corruption Commission monitors the proceedings from this court and this report is the first from our monitoring of its proceedings. 

Corruption Perception Survey Report, 2019

This report – commissioned by the Centre for Accountability and Rule of Law (with funding from DFID and support from Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) - seeks a bottom-up account from the Sierra Leonean people regarding the status of corruption. It examines their perceptions about the fight against corruption; about the institutions involved; about the delivery of public services, and about their own roles and actions in relation to the fight against corruption. The study was conducted between September and November 2019. Three data streams were utilized: a literature review; a social survey where 2619 persons were interviewed in all 16 districts of the country; followed by in-depth interviews geared towards getting detailed insights from experts and practitioners regarding their observations and reactions to the findings of the social survey 

Cost of Corruption in Sierra Leone Report, 2019

Corruption happens underground and its damage and volume can be difficult to quantify. This report systematically presents data on the quantitative estimate of the cost of corruption that occurred between 2016 - 2018 – the period leading up to the 2018 general elections in Sierra Leone onto the transfer of power to the opposition. The Centre for Accountability and the Rule of Law (CARL), along with its project consortium partners (Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) commissioned this study to generate data which anti-corruption agencies and their partners could utilise to develop more effective tools to respond to and track progress in fighting corruption. Data was collected from ten sectors which form 72.5 percent of the economy. The sectors studied include agriculture, mining, energy, fishery, construction, banking, education, health, transport and communication

Christian Aid’s gender pay gap report 2019-2020

A 2-page report from our Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi. The report covers: A comparison of both the mean (average) and median (mid-point) in the hourly rate we paid to men and women on 5 April 2019 How our gender pay gap is driven, according to our analysis How our gender pay gap compares to organisations across the UK and within our sector What we're doing to address the gender pay gap at Christian Aid

Christian Aid’s gender pay gap report 2018-2019

A 2-page report from our Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi. The report covers: A comparison of both the mean (average) and median (mid-point) in the hourly rate we paid to men and women on 5 April 2018 How our gender pay gap is driven, according to our analysis How our gender pay gap compares to organisations across the UK and within our sector What we're doing to address the gender pay gap at Christian Aid

Counting the cost: A year of climate breakdown

2018 was the fourth-hottest year on record. Extreme weather hit every populated continent in 2018. The economic cost ran high – into the billions – but the human cost was higher: injury, death and displacement. This report looks at 10 of the most destructive weather events of 2018, across countries rich and poor, and their devastating consequences.

Briefing paper: 'Sinking Cities, Rising Seas'

What this paper is about This paper looks at eight city case studies across Asia, Africa, the UK and the United States, including cities most vulnerable to climate change. It explores: some of the underlying reasons for those cities' vulnerability the additional impact that climate change will have on their people

Connecting the Voices of People across Kaduna and Southeast State

Connecting the Voices of people across Kaduna and Southeast State is an endline evaluation report for the Voice to the People (V2P) project which was implemented in Kaduna state and all the 5 states in southeast Nigeria. This document presents key findings of the successes and challenges form V2P and makes tangible recommendations for the implementation of similar governance programmes and interventions from the lessons learnt. The study was carried out in four of the project states (Anambra, Ebonyi, Imo and Kaduna States) covering 16 local government areas (LGAs) and 41 communities involving different categories - community leader, member of a community group, community facilitator and community member without a community function (i.e. an ordinary community member).

Christian Aid’s gender pay gap report 2017-2018

A report from our CEO, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi, on the gender pay gap at Christian Aid.

Doing Accountability Differently - Voice to the People, Nigeria

Exploring practice and results of Christian Aid’s Voice to the People Programme in Anambra State, Nigeria. Enhancing accountable governance has long been a major concern of development programming, but matching this interest with change that is both sustainable and replicable at multiple levels has not been easily achieved. Recent studies suggest that accountability initiatives will only work if they take local power relations into account, and that the limited traction attained to date could be kick-started with a strategy geared towards vertically integrated accountability. To that end, Voice to the People (V2P) has taken a power-aware approach that enabled collaboration amongst community-level, local government and state-level actors and vertical integration of advances at each stage, making it an instructive case study for replicating and scaling up effective accountability programming. Drawing on focus groups and interviews with key informants and a review of project documents, this paper reflects on the lessons that can be learned from V2P, a programme funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and implemented by Christian Aid in partnership with local organisations in Anambra State, Nigeria.

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 1)

In this policy briefing, Christian Aid examines the links between climate change and conflict, and begins to elaborate on its argument that the best form of climate security is climate justice.

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 2)

A debilitating drought may bring riots and social unrest in one country, but in a neighbouring country, the same problem may be dealt with by citizen mobilisation towards collective action solutions. To a large extent, governance capacity and community resilience explains the nature and structure of the response. In this report, three case studies – from Angola, Mali, and Honduras – of actual responses to climate change and conflict are presented.

Challenges in the Sahel: Implications for peace and development

A ‘perfect storm’ - an extraordinary combination of poverty, violent conflict, corruption, criminality, and climate change - is blowing over Mali and across the Sahel. Within this storm, some unusual actors have emerged. Politicians are known to be corrupt but still get elected and smugglers are criminalised by authorities but are also the only providers of employment in disintegrating local economies. This report is part of a series that Christian Aid is producing to understand what ought to be done differently in tackling violence and building peace.