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Virtuous Circle: scaling up investment in low carbon energy

This report demonstrates that the time for rapid deployment of renewable energy technologies is now. It shows that governments, policy makers and investors should realise that clean energy and clean energy investments are reliable, cost effective and scalable, and a solution for delivering clean and sustainable energy for all.

Maximising the benefits of the global phase-down of hydrofluorocarbons

This paper, published for the 30th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol, discusses what is at stake in the implementation of the HFCs phase-down and related activities. It describes a suite of measures that, if taken together, will maximise the benefits of the phase-down of HFC refrigerants with high global warming potential, both in terms of the greenhouse gas emissions, and additional, sustainable development co-benefits. Summary The proliferation of household air conditioners and refrigerators across the world, including the rapid growth expected in developing countries, gives us an opportunity, right now, to ensure that the appliances we choose have minimum impact on the global climate and maximise sustainable development.  Last year’s hard-won Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol ensured a commitment to remove HFC refrigerants with high global warming potential, through a global phase-down. Maximising the climate change and related benefits of this phase-down will depend on three elements coming together:  countries choosing refrigerants with the lowest global warming potentials  ensuring promotion of the most energy efficient cooling technologies  a rapid move to renewable energy to power these appliances. The right combination of these three elements will ensure that greenhouse gas emissions over the lifetime of each appliance are minimised.   Minimising greenhouse gas emissions Achieving each of these elements will require a range of actions, including addressing financing and cost issues, supporting capacity building and training, developing energy infrastructure plans and updating safety and energy efficiency standards. These diverse actions will need to be coordinated strategically, often across a number of distinct but critical venues, including the Montreal Protocol, the UNFCCC, various regional groups and domestic policy-making.  As we implement both the Montreal Protocol Kigali Amendment and the Paris Agreement, making the right coordinated and complementary decisions across these issues and venues will be essential to deliver a safe world with below 1.5C of global warming.

Christian Aid gender strategy: just and equitable power relations

Our 2017 gender strategy reaffirms and renews our commitment to prioritising gender justice, especially for women and girls, throughout the organisation and in our work.  Our vision is to end poverty, and in our corporate strategy 'Partnership for Change', we identify three main goals which will help us to achieve this: Ensure just power relations Ensure equity and sustainability Ensure resilient and thriving societies Gender injustice is rooted in unequal power relations and the most pervasive gender inequality is between women and men. Gender injustice violates human rights, constrains choice and agency and negatively impacts upon people’s ability to participate in, contribute to and benefit from development and humanitarian relief. Unless we can help create just and equitable relationships between women and men of all ages and diversities, we will be unable to achieve equitable, sustainable, resilient and thriving societies. Gender justice is, therefore, at the heart of Christian Aid’s work. We also recognise that inequalities intersect and create complex disadvantages that compound gender injustice and poverty. We therefore take an inclusive and intersectional approach that enables us to address how inequalities, such as sexual orientation, ethnicity, age, class, religion, caste and disability, intersect with gender inequality and perpetuate poverty.

Gender Analysis of Village Savings and Loans (ECRP)

Womens’ empowerment is a slow and incremental process, in which village and savings loan groups (VSL) can play a crucial role. In order to understand the impact of gender relations on VSL interventions, and vice-versa, focusing on the perceptions of men and women participating in VSL, household decision-making, and women’s access and control of VSL resources, Christian Aid commissioned a Gender and Power Analysis of VSL within ECRP. The study consists of a literature and document review, and primary qualitative research with 330 participants (191 women and 139 men) in 5 ECRP intervention districts; Kasungu, Mwanza, Mulanje, Nsanje, and Machinga. The analysis will progress by examining the influence of gender dynamics on VSL, and VSL on gender dynamics, relating to the woman herself, her household, the intervention, and the wider community.

Pour la justice de genre: Un résumé de la stratégie de Christian Aid sur l’égalité des genres

Un résumé de la stratégie de Christian Aid sur l’égalité des genres. (French language version of our gender strategy)

Of the Same Flesh: exploring a theology of gender

This report provides a theological underpinning for Christian Aid’s gender justice work.

Christian Aid Ethiopia Country Strategy 2012-2017

Ethiopia has one of the world’s fastest-growing populations and is the second most populous country in Africa. While the country is experiencing high levels of economic growth, it still faces major challenges such as food insecurity, cyclical disasters, population pressure, unemployment, disease and natural resource degradation. Christian Aid has worked in Ethiopia for more than 30 years, initially responding to emergencies but gradually building a long-term development programme. Over the years, our work has focused on food security, secure livelihoods, HIV, accountable governance, economic justice, pro-poor energy and climate change. Christian Aid’s country strategy for Ethiopia contributes to several of the global goals laid out in Partnership for Change. We will create conditions in which poor women and men achieve greater influence over decision-making institutions and processes that affect their lives. Through our programme, access to the essential services necessary for good health will increase in remote and vulnerable communities. Christian Aid Ethiopia will work for more productive, sustainable and resilient livelihood opportunities, and fair shares of resources for disadvantaged people, through better market information and access.

Zambia Joint Country Programme Strategic Plan 2016-20

This new strategy for the Joint Country Programme (JCP) Zambia builds on years of experience working with partners in Zambia. The JCP is a joint venture of Christian Aid, DanChurchAid and Norwegian Church Aid.