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Accountable Governance, Power and Human Rights Framework

This document articulates how Christian Aid addresses power imbalances through accountable governance and equipping people to access their rights.

Christian Aid Nigeria programme strategy: 2019-2026

An overview of the vision, mission and strategy of the Christian Aid Nigeria programme for 2019-2026. For the next seven years, we will continue Standing Together with the most marginalised and vulnerable people to ensure everyone has the opportunity to live a full life and poverty is eradicated. Our essential purpose as an organisation is to see an end to poverty, and Christian Aid Nigeria is committed to seeing this become a reality. This new strategy will guide our activities and help us tackle the power imbalance that perpetuates poverty in Nigeria.

Amazon Strategy: social, climate and economic justice

Our vision is to see an Amazon region where communities are the driving force behind sustainable development, challenging unjust systems to strive for social, climate and economic justice. We envision an Amazon region where development is inclusive and respects the environment. With these conditions, we hope to see a place where indigenous, Quilombola and farming communities can thrive.

Research summary: better forecasting delivers impact

Since 2007, Rice Watch Action Network has been helping small-scale farmers adapt to a changing environment through the Climate Resiliency Field School. This is a summary of the impact assessment on developing climate services in the Philippines.

Tackling violence, building peace: global strategy 2016

Violence and conflict affects almost one fifth of the world’s population or 1.5 billion people. The daily fear, uncertainty and suffering borne by people living through violent conflicts in countries such as Syria, Iraq and South Sudan is immeasurable and unimaginable. The war in Syria, has contributed to the highest number of displaced people since World War II; nearly five million having fled its bombs and bullets. Meanwhile, the catastrophe continues for people trapped in besieged villages across Syria and Iraq. Other countries like Colombia are striving to end protracted conflicts and push peace over the line. Today, one in every 122 people is now a refugee, internally displaced or seeking asylum, and the cost of world military spending is said to be nearly 250 times more than is spent on peace building. Christian Aid has adopted ‘Tackling Violence, Building Peace,’ as a strategic priority to address these critical trends and because we know that human development cannot be achieved without tackling violence. Seventy years after Christian Aid’s establishment, the root causes and levels of violence in poor communities where we work persists, often at higher levels and irrespective of whether those communities are ‘at war’ or not. Most of the world’s poorest people live outside of any form of protection and remain vulnerable to war and conflict, violent criminal organisations, gender-based violence, police abuse, forced labour and violent theft of land and other assets on a daily basis. People who do not have a safe place to call home, reliable access to food and an income because of violence, cannot plan for the future. Communities living through daily violence cannot thrive. And children who are forced to leave school because of violence are denied a chance at their hopes and dreams. Women and girls are also increasingly subject to physical and sexual violence, a harrowing result of gender inequality. Conflict is complex and even when peace comes, it does not always signal an end to violence. It can mark a shift from militarised conflict to widespread social conflict. For example, in Central America more people die violently today due to crime than during the civil wars of Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua combined. Our new strategy underpins our commitment to tackle violence and to promote just and lasting peace and security where we work. The strategy is deeply informed by our work in countries across the globe and reflects the aspirations and vision of our local partners. Peace is both an end in itself and a prerequisite for development. ‘Tackling Violence, Building Peace’ is our pledge to work tirelessly and collectively towards a safer future that secures justice and human rights for all.

Sierra Leone: assessment of governance programming methodology

This guidance document provides an introduction to the overall approach for the assessment; an overview of methods used; and issues for consideration when using these or similar methods.  It is based on the consultants’ experience of carrying out the assessment in Kailahun, Sierra Leone over five and a half days in September 2015. The methods section contains an introduction to each method, notes about facilitation, and identification of some benefits of use.    Please note, this document is not intended to be a comprehensive set of guidelines on delivering these methods. It is an accompaniment to the main report, Stand strong: women and politics, Kailahun, Sierra Leone. Both are part of Christian Aid’s 2015 impact assessment on governance programming. Related resources Sierra Leone: women and politics - qualitative participatory research

LPRR: action learning research

In order for productive learning to occur within the context of this project, monitoring practices must be robust and go beyond collecting data against indicators. This is especially important within a resilience context, as the pre-emptive baseline measurement that is usually used for measuring progress/success is not desirable here. Instead, an ‘outcome harvesting’ approach is more practical, as it does not measure progress towards predetermined outcomes or objectives, but rather collects evidence of what has been achieved, and works backward to determine whether and how the project or intervention contributed to the change. Within the LPRR project there is a need for rigorous evaluation, which balances accountability and learning. Given the ever-evolving evidence base of ‘what works under what conditions’ coupled with the need to demonstrate quality, impactful programming in both upwards and downwards accountability, these types of robust evaluations are essential. In order to ensure learning and accountability are achieved through evaluations, they must be well-planned and budgeted for. This is where the role of the learning strand comes in; by recognising that learning is essential at the outset, it enables it to be included within the design of the project.

Christian Aid Nigeria programme strategy 2012-17

An overview of the vision, aims and activities of our Nigeria country programme.

Zambia Joint Country Programme Strategic Plan 2016-20

This new strategy for the Joint Country Programme (JCP) Zambia builds on years of experience working with partners in Zambia. The JCP is a joint venture of Christian Aid, DanChurchAid and Norwegian Church Aid.

Measuring resilience impact at programme and project levels

A 'how to' guide on measuring the impact of resilience programming. This guide offers a wealth of information, from data collection considerations to communication and use of findings.