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Honour the Promises: One year on from the Rohingya pledging conference

On 23 October 2017, a pledging conference at the United Nations resulted in 36 financial commitments for the Rohingya crisis response. At the time, Christian Aid welcomed the pledges as a 'good start'. However, our new analysis reveals that less than half of funding requirements have been met, a year on. This policy paper explains why it’s time for a comprehensive long-range plan to protect all those displaced by conflict.  

Climate inequality in the Commonwealth: a call for urgent action

This report ranks the climate pledges of the 53 Commonwealth countries and shows that its richer members, including Australia, Canada and the UK, are failing to do their fair share to prevent climate change, while poorer nations are working much harder. Our analysis exposes the climate inequality at the heart of the Commonwealth.  

Virtuous Circle: scaling up investment in low carbon energy

This report demonstrates that the time for rapid deployment of renewable energy technologies is now. It shows that governments, policy makers and investors should realise that clean energy and clean energy investments are reliable, cost effective and scalable, and a solution for delivering clean and sustainable energy for all.

Christian Aid response to the Rohingya pledging conference

Humanitarian policy statement: Christian Aid's response to the UN-backed donor pledging conference for the Rohingya crisis, held on 23 October 2017.

New pathways out of poverty in Africa: sustainable agriculture

A Christian Aid and CAFOD policy paper investigating how agricultural transformation has become a development priority for African governments and the international development community. It is commonly understood as a shift from ‘low’ productivity subsistence agriculture to more commercially-oriented production. This shift is seen as the first step away from the continent’s continued dependence on raw commodity exports, and towards diversified and domestically integrated economies that provide sufficient employment opportunities to the world’s youngest and fastest-growing population.   This is to be welcomed. However, this report highlights the risk that agricultural transformation strategies already underway in some African countries could increase inequality and further degrade the environment. To prevent this from happening agriculture transformation strategies need to: integrate actions that will build the resilience of producer households and wider ecosystems to climate and economic shocks, instead of focusing predominantly on increasing the productivity of smallholders link smallholder producers to the wider domestic economy.  CAFOD and Christian Aid programmes that support small agro-enterprise development, climate resilience building and inclusive agricultural market development include deliberate actions to ensure equitable and environmentally sustainable outcomes. To further promote the integration of these principles in the design and implementation of government policies, we have initiated an on-going dialogue with our partner organisations in Africa to determine how agricultural transformation policies in their own countries can contribute to more equitable and sustainable development.

Towards a sustainable economy: private sector

This report argues that the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the UN Financing for Development process, and the Paris Agreement have opened up a dialogue between NGOs, governments and the private sector about the opportunities and risks around the transition to a sustainable economy.