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Salt Newsletter July 2020

Download the latest Salt newsletter for July, covering topics including faith in uncertain times, building diverse businesses, and business with purpose. 

Socialise to Immunise: boosting vaccination uptake through Facebook

In Myanmar's Kachin state only 54-60% of children under 2 years have received all basic vaccinations. However, the rates for individual vaccination of children is much higher, such as 91.2% for the BCG vaccine.[i] We know that vaccine hesitancy is a complex issue. The WHO identifies three main driving factors; confidence, complacency and convenience. Conventional methods to increase basic child vaccination rates, mostly target caregivers directly to increase people’s knowledge and thus change attitudes and behaviour. Our own research shows that social networks have a strong influence on immunisation behaviour.[ii] An important factor in this respect is the ‘social bandwagon effect’, meaning that caregivers do what everyone does, adhere to the social-cultural norm regarding vaccination, which can be to either follow or not follow the vaccination schedules. The slightest increase in uptake by influential individuals in a group leads to positive spillover in the wider community.[iii] Our Socialise to Immunise project will be piloting and testing an unconventional approach, using Facebook. This interactive approach, based on the premise that the social norm of vaccination behaviour is strongly influenced by peer pressure (social bandwagon), will involve and connect different stakeholders in the vaccination-demand process: caregivers, household decision-makers, community immunisation champions, community members, health care providers. This approach is innovative as it will trial a digital social network which simultaneously addresses the three driving factors as identified by WHO. This update shows how the first stages of the project are progressing and some learnings we are taking forward. [ii] Shi et al., Voluntary vaccination through self organizing behaviors on locally mixed social networks, Scientific Reports 7, 2017 (2665) [iii] Buttenheim AM, Asch DA. Behavioral economics: the key to closing the gap for MDGs 4 and 5? Maternal and child health journal 2013; 17 (4): 581-5 [i] Myanmar Demographic and Health Survey, 2015-2016

Christian Aid Ethiopia newsletter July 2019

Latest updates from Christian Aid Ethiopia on our programmes, including promoting women's entrepreneurship in sustainable energy, meteorological services, drought recovery, veterinary services, education and water projects. Projects featured include the EU-funded Breaking the Barriers project and the DEC drought response.

Joint Country Programme newsletter - July - Sept 2018

A new country director, piped water comes to villages in Mumbeji, advocating for tax justice and more...

Humanitarian response to populations affected by violence in Konduga

A Christian Aid (CA) humanitarian response programme funded by the European Union’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations has reached more than 40,000 people affected by the conflict in Konduga area, within Borno State. Food Security and Livelihoods (FSL) and Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) are the major response areas which has targeted the most vulnerable persons. ECHO has empowered Christian Aid to support access to food for the most vulnerable persons in Konduga through cash based interventions. The food security response targeted 18,000 people through a cash transfer intervention to help the vulnerable access food. Those reached through food assistance are spread across five communities within Konduga Local Government Area, in Borno State.

The Salt Newsletter Feb 2017

Download the Salt Business Network's first newsletter and find out how these value-led business leaders are standing up to global poverty. 

Christian Aid and the Leave No One Behind Agenda

The call to ‘Leave No One Behind’ puts equity at the heart of the development and humanitarian agenda for the coming decades. At Christian Aid, we have an ambition to see an end to poverty for all but glaring inequalities mean that we are not starting with the level playing field needed to bring about this change. Some groups and individuals have been marginalised or excluded for centuries and need greater attention than others. Without this focus on equity, we will see a continuation of ‘a rising tide that lifts all boats’ approach that excludes millions of the poorest people and deepens the inequalities that drive conflict, poverty and discrimination. This document is a summary of how Christian Aid views the implications of the principle Leave NoOne Behind in its programme practice. It sets out the heritage of work that Christian Aid brings to this commitment, its current approaches, and ways forward as we seek to make the goal of ‘Equality for All’ a reality in and throughout our programmes. Our work is evolving quickly in this area and so we have sought to create a snapshot of where we are now rather than provide extensive details of the work or long guidance documents. Given the entrenched power imbalances that will need to be challenged and changed by action at personal, local, national, regional and global levels, we know this is a long and complex journey but it is one which is at the very heart of our vision.

PACS programme summary film

A final wrap up film of the Poorest Areas Civil Society programme in India, showing achievements and learnings.

Christian Aid's Policy on Family Planning

This organisational policy document outlines Christian Aid's position on family planning.

Doing justice to poverty: understanding poverty and its implications

A position paper outlining Christian Aid's understanding of what poverty is, what causes it and the consequences it has.