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MP Breifing: Climate and Debt 2021

Use this briefing to speak to your local MP about climate justice and debt cancellation

Under the radar

Private sector debt and coronavirus in developing countries The G20 must step in and compel private creditors to cancel the debts of developing countries to avoid the loss of many more lives. In the global south, coronavirus is leaving a trail of devastation - from widespread loss of life from the virus itself, to huge economic disruption that has left hundreds of millions of people, who were already struggling to make ends meet, without jobs or sufficient food. Despite this huge economic shock, many developing countries are continuing to pay off debts to rich countries, public institutions like the World Bank and IMF, and some of the richest banks and hedge funds in the world. This means they have less money to meet the immediate needs of the population. This briefing aims to shine a light on the debt owed to private creditors by five African countries - Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal and Zambia - and it outlines the steps which the G20 needs to take immediately to avert further economic chaos. It highlights the central role of enormous financial corporations like BlackRock, HSBC, Goldman Sachs, Legal & General, JP Morgan and UBS, which have become increasingly important in the world of sovereign debt. Private creditors’ share of the foreign debts of low- and lower-middle income governments increased from 25% in 2010 to 47% in 2018.1 Multi-trillion dollar asset manager BlackRock alone holds close to US$1 billion of ‘Eurobonds’ in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal and Zambia through a number of funds.

Keeping the SDGs on track

Detailing how the three basic SDG principles can be put into practice by improving accountability mechanisms under the High Level Political Forum .

Generando Empresas y Derechos Humanos

Las prácticas corporativas irresponsables representan graves riesgos para los derechos humanos. A menudo, tienen impactos que afectan a las personas de manera diferente debido a su género, haciendo que las desigualdades que ya experimentan sean aún mayores. En este informe, identificamos estudios de casos, destacamos temas clave sobre el impacto de género de las prácticas corporativas y exploramos su relación con el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos y los marcos relacionados. Creemos que las empresas, en particular las empresas transnacionales, deben hacer valer los derechos humanos y deben ser responsabilizadas por el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos. También creemos que el Marco de Negocios y Derechos Humanos de la ONU, sus mecanismos de implementación, y los estados y entidades comerciales a los que se aplica, deben responder mejor a los impactos negativos de las empresas en los derechos de las mujeres y los géneros marginados.

Modern day slavery: what is it?

Modern slavery is one of the most discussed human rights issues of our time, but what really is it? Download this guide from the Salt Business Network. 

Engendering Business and Human Rights

Irresponsible corporate practices pose serious human rights risks. Often, they have impacts which affect people differently because of their gender, making the inequalities that they already experience even greater. In this report, we identify case studies, highlight key issues on the gendered impact of corporate practices, and explore their relationship with international human rights law and related frameworks. We believe that businesses, in particular transnational corporations, must bring human rights to bear and must be held to account under international human rights law. We also believe that the UN Business and Human Rights Framework, its implementation mechanisms, and the states and business entities to which it applies, must respond better to the negative impacts of business on the rights of women and marginalised genders.

World Bank & IMF briefings

Read our briefing papers ahead of the World Bank Group's 2019 Spring Meetings The Big Shift Needed for Climate Justice A Just Global Economy Leave No One Behind? From Violence to Peace

Financing Injustice

We need a radically different and rebalanced financial system which ensures that the very poorest are included and actively supported to thrive, and in which developing countries have an equal say in making the rules governing the global economy. This briefing looks at progress towards the Sustainable Development goals (SDGs), financing for development, private finance and alternatives, and good investment.  Download a Spanish version here

Engaging in the peace process in Colombia

Christian Aid and our partners have worked to tackle violence and build peace for more than 20 years in Colombia, demanding an end to violence and calling for justice on issues of impunity and human rights violations committed in the course of the conflict. This paper, on the second anniversary of the signing of the Colombian Final Peace Agreement, gives a brief overview of this work and shares the key programmatic learnings, reflections and insights from this experience of peacebuilding by our partners. 

New pathways out of poverty in Africa: sustainable agriculture

A Christian Aid and CAFOD policy paper investigating how agricultural transformation has become a development priority for African governments and the international development community. It is commonly understood as a shift from ‘low’ productivity subsistence agriculture to more commercially-oriented production. This shift is seen as the first step away from the continent’s continued dependence on raw commodity exports, and towards diversified and domestically integrated economies that provide sufficient employment opportunities to the world’s youngest and fastest-growing population.   This is to be welcomed. However, this report highlights the risk that agricultural transformation strategies already underway in some African countries could increase inequality and further degrade the environment. To prevent this from happening agriculture transformation strategies need to: integrate actions that will build the resilience of producer households and wider ecosystems to climate and economic shocks, instead of focusing predominantly on increasing the productivity of smallholders link smallholder producers to the wider domestic economy.  CAFOD and Christian Aid programmes that support small agro-enterprise development, climate resilience building and inclusive agricultural market development include deliberate actions to ensure equitable and environmentally sustainable outcomes. To further promote the integration of these principles in the design and implementation of government policies, we have initiated an on-going dialogue with our partner organisations in Africa to determine how agricultural transformation policies in their own countries can contribute to more equitable and sustainable development.

Supporting small businesses in developing countries: briefing paper

Which programmes work and why? How governments and donors can better support inclusive economic development.

How to implement values-based business models

Download this briefing from the Salt Business Network outlining how to create a values-based business model.