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Women on the Front Line

Read our new report which recognises that women are disproportionately affected by climate change.

Counting the cost 2020: a year of climate breakdown

Identifying 15 of the most destructive climate disasters of the year.

Whose Green Recovery

A report outlining what a global green recovery would look like.

Black Lives Matter Everywhere

Apart from the Covid-19 pandemic, the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement has been one of the defining themes of 2020. Sparked by the death of George Floyd and other examples of police brutality in the United States, it quickly spread to include a wider debate about racial inequalities around the world. Climate change, although something which will affect us all, is a deeply racialised phenomenon. Black and brown people in the poorest countries face the brunt of the impacts, caused in large part by fossil fuel burning in rich, majority-White nations. But this inequality is often overlooked because climate change is associated with science and the language used to describe it is often technical jargon relating to atmospheric carbon atoms and global temperature readings. The cold neutrality of climate science obscures the fact that the drivers and impacts of the climate emergency are personal and societal, and tied to political decisions with clear racial implications. People in the, as-yet, more sheltered corners of the global North are now starting to experience the force of the climate crisis, but across the global South it is something they have already been feeling the effects of for years. Be they extreme weather events in Latin America, droughts in East Africa, floods in Bangladesh or sea level rise threatening the existence of Pacific Islands, climate change is not just a future threat but a present reality. Climate change and its disproportionate effects on those that have done the least to cause it has been known about for decades. And yet emissions continue to rise. If poor political decisions and unjust policies have helped to cause the climate crisis, then it’s equally the case that the right policies and decisions have an essential role to play in addressing the problem and putting the world on a path to climate justice. We’re beginning to see such movement, although not nearly fast enough. Politicians around the world have claimed to be moved by racial injustice. Making rapid and far reaching climate action a priority would be a good start in ensuring black lives matter everywhere.

UK Climate Fair Share

This technical paper describes the calculations behind an infographic (2020) that describes the UK's 'Fair Share' of emissions reduction to meet the targets of the Paris Agreement. It includes  a memo provided by the Climate Equity Reference Project, which carried out the fair shares analysis based on the Climate Equity Reference Framework. The memo describes the global mitigation pathway and the effort sharing framework used, and shows results for the UK. It also describes the assumptions and judgements taken by the UK groups that jointly produced the infographic, for making conclusions about  financial resources required for the UK to implement its fair share.    

Developing skills for life and making connections in Ghana

In this final update from our EU funded GEOP programme in Ghana, we discover how young men and women are gaining technical, business and leadership skills and are using their collective voice to create better working environments. 

Counting the cost: A year of climate breakdown

2018 was the fourth-hottest year on record. Extreme weather hit every populated continent in 2018. The economic cost ran high – into the billions – but the human cost was higher: injury, death and displacement. This report looks at 10 of the most destructive weather events of 2018, across countries rich and poor, and their devastating consequences.

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 1)

In this policy briefing, Christian Aid examines the links between climate change and conflict, and begins to elaborate on its argument that the best form of climate security is climate justice.

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 2)

A debilitating drought may bring riots and social unrest in one country, but in a neighbouring country, the same problem may be dealt with by citizen mobilisation towards collective action solutions. To a large extent, governance capacity and community resilience explains the nature and structure of the response. In this report, three case studies – from Angola, Mali, and Honduras – of actual responses to climate change and conflict are presented.

Marsabit County Resilience Study

For several years Christian Aid has worked through partners to build the resilience of pastoralist communities in Marsabit County in northern Kenya. The fieldwork was carried out over two weeks in May 2017 to assess the value of investing in resilience work. 

New pathways out of poverty in Africa: sustainable agriculture

A Christian Aid and CAFOD policy paper investigating how agricultural transformation has become a development priority for African governments and the international development community. It is commonly understood as a shift from ‘low’ productivity subsistence agriculture to more commercially-oriented production. This shift is seen as the first step away from the continent’s continued dependence on raw commodity exports, and towards diversified and domestically integrated economies that provide sufficient employment opportunities to the world’s youngest and fastest-growing population.   This is to be welcomed. However, this report highlights the risk that agricultural transformation strategies already underway in some African countries could increase inequality and further degrade the environment. To prevent this from happening agriculture transformation strategies need to: integrate actions that will build the resilience of producer households and wider ecosystems to climate and economic shocks, instead of focusing predominantly on increasing the productivity of smallholders link smallholder producers to the wider domestic economy.  CAFOD and Christian Aid programmes that support small agro-enterprise development, climate resilience building and inclusive agricultural market development include deliberate actions to ensure equitable and environmentally sustainable outcomes. To further promote the integration of these principles in the design and implementation of government policies, we have initiated an on-going dialogue with our partner organisations in Africa to determine how agricultural transformation policies in their own countries can contribute to more equitable and sustainable development.

Challenges in the Sahel: Implications for peace and development

A ‘perfect storm’ - an extraordinary combination of poverty, violent conflict, corruption, criminality, and climate change - is blowing over Mali and across the Sahel. Within this storm, some unusual actors have emerged. Politicians are known to be corrupt but still get elected and smugglers are criminalised by authorities but are also the only providers of employment in disintegrating local economies. This report is part of a series that Christian Aid is producing to understand what ought to be done differently in tackling violence and building peace.

The Scandal of Inequality 2 (Spanish)

Describe las diferentes caras de la desigualdad en America Latina y el Caribe

Voice to the people: research summary

This paper shares findings from a review of Christian Aid’s work using communications for development (C4D) approaches to strengthen the voice of programme participants and aid recipients in programme learning and communications. It draws on documentation and interviews with Christian Aid staff and consultants involved in the work, as well as some research with other development organisations, to explore how C4D can be more integrated into Christian Aid’s work to promote more direct communications from programmes.

Paris 2015: getting a global agreement on climate change

This joint-NGO publication gives a guide to the global deal and shows that an ambitious and fair deal is possible with the right political will.  

Developing Climate services in the Phillipines: programme review

A review of the Rice Watch Action Network's Climate Resiliency Field School (CrFS) - a season-long training programme with a focus on sustainable farm training, including increased access to weather and climate forecasts.