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Christian Aid response to the Rohingya pledging conference

Humanitarian policy statement: Christian Aid's response to the UN-backed donor pledging conference for the Rohingya crisis, held on 23 October 2017.

New pathways out of poverty in Africa: sustainable agriculture

A Christian Aid and CAFOD policy paper investigating how agricultural transformation has become a development priority for African governments and the international development community. It is commonly understood as a shift from ‘low’ productivity subsistence agriculture to more commercially-oriented production. This shift is seen as the first step away from the continent’s continued dependence on raw commodity exports, and towards diversified and domestically integrated economies that provide sufficient employment opportunities to the world’s youngest and fastest-growing population.   This is to be welcomed. However, this report highlights the risk that agricultural transformation strategies already underway in some African countries could increase inequality and further degrade the environment. To prevent this from happening agriculture transformation strategies need to: integrate actions that will build the resilience of producer households and wider ecosystems to climate and economic shocks, instead of focusing predominantly on increasing the productivity of smallholders link smallholder producers to the wider domestic economy.  CAFOD and Christian Aid programmes that support small agro-enterprise development, climate resilience building and inclusive agricultural market development include deliberate actions to ensure equitable and environmentally sustainable outcomes. To further promote the integration of these principles in the design and implementation of government policies, we have initiated an on-going dialogue with our partner organisations in Africa to determine how agricultural transformation policies in their own countries can contribute to more equitable and sustainable development.

Scandal of inequality 2 infographic (Spanish)

Infographic to accompany the Scandal of inequality 2 report

The scandal of inequality 2 infographic (English)

Infographic to accompany the Scandal of inequality 2 report (English)

Christian Aid gender strategy: just and equitable power relations

Our 2017 gender strategy reaffirms and renews our commitment to prioritising gender justice, especially for women and girls, throughout the organisation and in our work.  Our vision is to end poverty, and in our corporate strategy 'Partnership for Change', we identify three main goals which will help us to achieve this: Ensure just power relations Ensure equity and sustainability Ensure resilient and thriving societies Gender injustice is rooted in unequal power relations and the most pervasive gender inequality is between women and men. Gender injustice violates human rights, constrains choice and agency and negatively impacts upon people’s ability to participate in, contribute to and benefit from development and humanitarian relief. Unless we can help create just and equitable relationships between women and men of all ages and diversities, we will be unable to achieve equitable, sustainable, resilient and thriving societies. Gender justice is, therefore, at the heart of Christian Aid’s work. We also recognise that inequalities intersect and create complex disadvantages that compound gender injustice and poverty. We therefore take an inclusive and intersectional approach that enables us to address how inequalities, such as sexual orientation, ethnicity, age, class, religion, caste and disability, intersect with gender inequality and perpetuate poverty.

Pour la justice de genre: Un résumé de la stratégie de Christian Aid sur l’égalité des genres

Un résumé de la stratégie de Christian Aid sur l’égalité des genres. (French language version of our gender strategy)

Christian Aid Afghanistan Country Strategy 2014-2016

CAID’s programme in Afghanistan has been running for three decades under four regimes – from the People’s Democratic Party of Afghanistan, which controlled the country during the Soviet invasion, to the current government voted in after the US-led intervention of 2001. Working with partners used to working in transitional and dangerous environments, Christian Aid is committed to delivering a long-term development programme in Afghanistan that addresses these issues by focusing on gender equity and building thriving, resilient livelihoods.

Christian Aid in the Middle East strategy 2013-2017

Christian Aid believes poverty and extreme levels of inequality in the Middle East stem from the systematic violations of people’s rights and from unjust, unaccountable power structures.

Christian Aid Latin American and Caribbean strategy

We have worked in Latin America and the Caribbean for more than 30 years, supporting our partners to tackle injustice, human rights violations and inequality.

Christian Aid Ghana country strategy 2012-2017

Christian Aid Ghana's strategy - our vision, goals, areas of expertise and who we work with.

Christian Aid Colombia estrategia 2012-2017 (Spanish)

Christian Aid ha trabajado en Colombia desde 1980. Nuestra misión principal es exponer la violencia estructural y física y desafiar los sistemas que evitan el cumplimiento de los derechos humanos de todas y todos.

Christian Aid Colombia country strategy 2012-17

Christian Aid has worked in Colombia since the 1980s. Our essential mission is to expose structural and physical violence and challenge the systems that prevent the fulfilment of human rights for all.

Brazil programme strategy 2012-2017

Christian Aid’s strategy in Brazil, aligned with Partnership for Change, focuses on promoting resilient paths of development that reduce gender and ethnic inequalities and preserve the environment.

Christian Aid Bangladesh strategy 2012-2017

Christian Aid Bangladesh’s strategy is closely aligned with several of the global goals laid out in Partnership for Change: ‘Power to change institutions’, ‘Fair shares in a constrained world’ and ‘Equality for all’. We work for equality for socially and economically marginalised communities, empowering them to know their rights, building their capabilities to negotiate with governing institutions, and ensuring their access to markets so they can enjoy a fair share of wealth and make the most of economic opportunities.