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Global Day of Action Briefing

Download our guide to the day of action and how to get your church involved

The Monsoon Accessorize Trust

The Monsoon Accessorize Trust

AquAid in partnership with Christian Aid

AquAid in partnership with Christian Aid

Christian Aid in the Philippines: an exit learning review

Building climate resilience and strengthening civil society

MP Briefing

A briefing to help you speak to your local MP about climate justice and debt cancellation

Christian Aid – supporter guide to the Scottish Parliament Election

The Scottish Parliament Elections on 6 May is an opportunity for us to follow the Way of Love.

SCCS - Supporter guide to the Scottish Parliament Elections 2021

Stop Climate Chaos Scotland supporter guide for Scottish Parliament Elections.

Climate Finance Briefing

Find out more about why money is at the heart of climate justice

South Africa learning review

Learning from our work in South Africa

Thank you For the Rain - watch party and screening resource

The Thank You For The Rain documentary film is a great way to explore, facilitate discussions, and empower young people to act on issues of global social justice. Our Watch Party and Screening Guide helps you set up an engaging event.

Letter for the World

Letters for the World is a Christian Aid project for children and young people who are passionate about climate change and climate justice, and who want to do something together.

Share, Show, Shout for Climate Justice Campaign

We’ve launched an important new campaign to make sure political parties in Scotland understand the need to show solidarity with our brothers and sisters on the frontline of the climate crisis.

Christian Aid Zimbabwe SMT

The team behind Christian Aid Zimbabwe

Counting the cost 2020: a year of climate breakdown

Identifying 15 of the most destructive climate disasters of the year.

Whose Green Recovery

A report outlining what a global green recovery would look like.

Black Lives Matter Everywhere

Apart from the Covid-19 pandemic, the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement has been one of the defining themes of 2020. Sparked by the death of George Floyd and other examples of police brutality in the United States, it quickly spread to include a wider debate about racial inequalities around the world. Climate change, although something which will affect us all, is a deeply racialised phenomenon. Black and brown people in the poorest countries face the brunt of the impacts, caused in large part by fossil fuel burning in rich, majority-White nations. But this inequality is often overlooked because climate change is associated with science and the language used to describe it is often technical jargon relating to atmospheric carbon atoms and global temperature readings. The cold neutrality of climate science obscures the fact that the drivers and impacts of the climate emergency are personal and societal, and tied to political decisions with clear racial implications. People in the, as-yet, more sheltered corners of the global North are now starting to experience the force of the climate crisis, but across the global South it is something they have already been feeling the effects of for years. Be they extreme weather events in Latin America, droughts in East Africa, floods in Bangladesh or sea level rise threatening the existence of Pacific Islands, climate change is not just a future threat but a present reality. Climate change and its disproportionate effects on those that have done the least to cause it has been known about for decades. And yet emissions continue to rise. If poor political decisions and unjust policies have helped to cause the climate crisis, then it’s equally the case that the right policies and decisions have an essential role to play in addressing the problem and putting the world on a path to climate justice. We’re beginning to see such movement, although not nearly fast enough. Politicians around the world have claimed to be moved by racial injustice. Making rapid and far reaching climate action a priority would be a good start in ensuring black lives matter everywhere.