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'Where is Palestine?' - report

Read the newly published report by our Head of Middle East Policy & Advocacy.

Taking Action on Climate Justice

A conversation guide for church groups, to help equip you to take action.

Taking Action on Climate Justice Posters

A selection of climate justice posters for use in your church.

Guidance on whistleblowing

It is the duty of every employee to speak up about genuine concerns in relation to criminal activity, breach of legal obligation (including negligence, breach of contract, breach of administrative law, miscarriage of justice, danger to health and safety or environment) and the cover up of any of these in the workplace. Christian Aid is committed to ensuring that any employee's concerns of this nature will be taken seriously and investigated, and as part of this commitment has developed this guidance note on whistleblowing.

Safeguarding policy

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of

Revenue Analysis, July 2020

Revenue Analysis, July 2020

Budget Credibility Report

Budget Credibility Report

June 2020, Sierra Leone Anti-Corruption Court Monitoring Report

June 2020, Sierra Leone Anti-Corruption Court Monitoring Report

Corruption Perception Survey Report, 2019

Corruption Perception Survey Report, 2019

Cost of Corruption in Sierra Leone Report, 2019

Cost of Corruption in Sierra Leone Report, 2019

Simmons and Simmons

Simmons and Simmons partnering for a fairer and more just world

Christian Aid’s gender pay gap report 2019-2020

A 2-page report from our Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi. The report covers: A comparison of both the mean (average) and median (mid-point) in the hourly rate we paid to men and women on 5 April 2019 How our gender pay gap is driven, according to our analysis How our gender pay gap compares to organisations across the UK and within our sector What we're doing to address the gender pay gap at Christian Aid

How Christian Aid pays its staff

The effective stewardship of resources is core to the vision and values that underpin Christian Aid’s work in seeking to bring about a fairer, more equitable world. We recognise the important responsibility we have to the poor communities we work with, our donors, supporters and the general public, to ensure we are open and transparent on how we use the funds that are so generously donated for the work we undertake.  We are committed to ensuring value for money in everything we do and this includes how we remunerate our staff. We operate a policy that is fair, equitable and consistent to attract, motivate and retain capable staff that have the skills and experience we require to implement the work we do.  What are our pay principles? Our salaries are set within in a policy that reflects the values and ethos of the organisation, benchmarking against other comparable charities and church organisations at a level that is just below or at the median of these comparators. The basic principle for determining salaries is that employees carrying out the same or similar jobs in the same location are paid the same or similar salary. Salaries differ where jobs are of a different size, complexity, responsibility and accountability. Tackling global poverty and social injustice is highly complex and we value the contribution that each individual employee makes to our organisation’s success. Our approach to reward is guided by the following principles which are applied equally to all our staff wherever they are located and whatever their position:  We will provide a total reward package which recognises contribution to the achievement of our aims. Our reward offering will be competitive in the marketplace from which we draw the people we need.  The reward decisions we make will be consistent and based on objective assessment of our organisational needs.  Wherever we can we will offer flexibility and choice so that individuals can achieve what is most relevant and has most value to them.  We will make arrangements which comply fully with relevant legislation wherever we are operating. How is pay governed? The implementation of our remuneration policy, which is set by the Board, is overseen by the Remuneration Committee. This committee has delegated authority to provide governance oversight and input on all matters concerning the principles and policies governing the pay and benefits of Christian Aid staff. Its responsibilities include: To consider any suggested changes to those principles and policies and make recommendations to the Board. To make recommendations to the Board for any necessary adjustments, consistent with affordability within agreed budget parameters. To collect and consider evidence of movements in the external pay market as it affects Christian Aid, and to make recommendations to the Board for any necessary adjustments required to ensure Christian Aid is able to recruit and retain appropriately skilled staff to implement its strategy effectively. To make recommendations from time to time to the Board on the broad policy framework and overall costs of the remuneration of the Chief Executive and the Directors and to determine the salary of the Chief Executive. Our lower salary band for all employed staff in the UK and Ireland is above the Living Wage, as is the salary of all third party contracted cleaning staff employed in our UK and Ireland regional and national offices. Christian is an accredited “Living Wage Employer”. For salaries of staff based in the UK and Ireland, the Board has adopted the “Hutton Fair Pay Review” recommendation which limits the differential of pay between the highest paid person and others, using a ratio based on the median salary. The Board has set this ratio at 4:1 on UK salaries. The salaries for our internationally based staff are set within their local employment market, against a benchmark of other comparable organisations, consistent with our overall remuneration policy. Further information on what we currently spend on salaries, including the salary of the Chief Executive, can be found in our 2016/17 Annual Report. How much is Christian Aid’s Chief Executive paid? Christian Aid’s Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi, earned £132,000 last year. We recognise that this is a large sum of money. Christian Aid makes every effort to avoid paying higher salaries than are necessary. We pay our staff salaries the same as, or below, the median of other church-based and/or international development agencies. A recent survey of UK charities showed that we pay significantly below the average pay of £167,000 for CEO’s of the top 100 charities, in terms of income, in the country. The Chief Executive role carries an immense amount of responsibility. This includes the stewardship, governance and oversight of how we spend our £106m annual income, the welfare of up to 900 staff and the projects we support to help lift millions of people out of poverty. Within Christian Aid we are committed to the idea that transparency empowers – that’s why we’re already one of the most transparent organisations in the sector. We’ve always been clear on who earns what and we’re accredited with the highest international standards of transparency. How do we manage annual pay reviews? Each year, Christian Aid conducts an annual pay review of staff salaries. In the UK and Ireland we calculate inflation rates using the average of Average Weekly Earnings Index (AWE) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Any inflationary award or other necessary adjustments made on salaries are subject to affordability. For our internationally based staff we use country data from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for calculating cost of living increases for country offices. Adjustments are implemented on April 1. Contact us

Christian Aid expectations for COP25

Christian Aid's key asks for the COP25 climate conference in Madrid, Spain, December 2019. The past 18 months have seen a flurry of new scientific information on the state of the climate. Severe climate impacts are already being experienced, particularly by the poorest and most vulnerable. Communities and ecosystems are already suffering devastation even at the current 1ºC of warming. The fires in the Amazon, Congo and California, the South Asian floods, and other extreme weather events, like cyclones Idai and Fani, point to a climate system already in crisis. The world is in a state of climate emergency. The climate emergency is real and efforts to take action now must be a priority. We call on governments to make a step change in their climate ambition and in the support given to help developing countries achieve it. Key asks Mitigation All countries to recognise the scale of the climate challenge and the need for a fair global effort to achieve the Paris 1.5ºC goal. The Conference of Parties (COP) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change should deliver a mandate for all countries to enhance the mitigation part of their Nationally-determined contributions (NDCs) in line with the 1.5ºC goal. The common time frame should be in five-year cycles. Long-term strategies should include landscape analyses to plan for nature-based solutions, to increase resilience, and to store and sequester carbon. Finance Adequate climate finance is a prerequisite to greater ambition in poor countries. Developed countries need to step up in providing adequate public finance to both help build resilience, but also to allow clean development and fulfillment – and exceedance - of the conditional parts of the NDCs. Loss and damage The Warsaw International Mechanism on Loss and Damage (WIM) should put greater focus on averting loss and damage than on post-event addressing of it. New, additional and adequate sources of climate finance are needed to enhance action. The potential of nature-based solutions for resilience should be given greater consideration and implementation priority. Adaptation Developing countries should be supported to complete and implement country-driven, gender-responsive, participatory and transparent adaptation plans. The overall financial flows, as well as the proportion of finance for adaptation need to be increased to allow vulnerable people, communities and ecosystems to adapt to the changing climate. Article 6 Rather than rely on ‘flexibility’ mechanisms, countries should instead focus on making transformational changes to their economies. Kyoto credits should play no role in any Paris mechanisms. Article 6 provisions should be adopted as a package. The Article 6 mechanisms should explicitly recognise the non-fungibility of fossil and biological carbon and prevent trade between them. Strong social and environmental safeguards are essential to be agreed before use of flexibility mechanisms. Nature-based solutions COP should recognise the potential co-benefits of nature-based solutions, as detailed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) reports, and agree means to promote their implementation Nature-based solutions for mitigation should not be seen as an alternative to ending the use of fossil fuels. It should be seen as an additional and precautionary approach, with other co-benefits, including for resilience. Appropriate links with the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)’s provisions should be made, and coherent implementation encouraged. Gender and Climate The revision must ensure that gender balance approaches are adopted under all the bodies of the convention. Download the full briefing here

Christian Aid Ethiopia Annual Report 2018/19

This report shows the impact of our work and testimonies that show how Christian Aid Ethiopia is supporting the most vulnerable communities in hard to reach parts of the country. It highlights out work on humanitarian response, DRR, strengthening climate services to farmers and pastoral communities, markets development and our work on promoting gender sensitive programming and support to communities to challenge power structures and systems that perpetuate gender violence. 

World in disunion: Climate change and the Rugby World Cup

  The effects of climate change are being felt around the world and the Pacific islands are among the worst affected. But unless greenhouse gas emissions fall, the consequences in the coming decades will be far worse than anything seen so far. Fiji, Samoa and Tonga face an onslaught as the world warms. Hotter and more acidic oceans, due to higher levels of carbon dioxide, kill coral reefs upon which fish populations depend, while rising sea levels will swallow land, increase flooding and salinate water supplies. The region is also likely to experience more category 3 to 5 storms, such as last year’s Cyclone Gita which was the strongest tropical cyclone to hit Tonga since records began. Together these climate change impacts threaten to undermine the islands’ economies, deter tourists, making life increasingly tough and driving young people away, putting strain on the countries’ ability to field competitive rugby teams. Researchers warn of mass migration from the islands as a result of climate change in the coming decades. Alongside the Pacific island countries at the Rugby World Cup are some of the countries most responsible for the climate crisis. Major greenhouse gas polluters like the US, Australia, the hosts Japan, Russia, Canada, South Africa and the European nations will play at the tournament, to the tune of a world in union. But few, if any, of the most polluting competitors have credible plans to cut their emissions to safe levels - suggesting the World Cup’s theme song is just an empty promise. It is not too late to prevent dangerous climate change and to save the future for the Pacific islands, and the rest of the world. But it requires immediate action to cut emissions.

SABI Learning Review: Triggering Citizen Action

SABI is a programme operating in all 16 districts of Sierra Leone to increase citizen demands to their governments for the delivery of basic services. This learning review asked the question – has SABI succeeded in supporting community citizen action for effective governance and improved public services? It draws on SABI’s database of 786 community action plans, and interviews and groups discussions with implementing partners, youth accountability volunteers and community members.

Christian Aid’s gender pay gap report 2018-2019

A 2-page report from our Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi. The report covers: A comparison of both the mean (average) and median (mid-point) in the hourly rate we paid to men and women on 5 April 2018 How our gender pay gap is driven, according to our analysis How our gender pay gap compares to organisations across the UK and within our sector What we're doing to address the gender pay gap at Christian Aid