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Counting the cost 2020: a year of climate breakdown

Identifying 15 of the most destructive climate disasters of the year.

A Rights-Based Economy Report

The COVID-19 pandemic has shone a spotlight on the fundamental injustice at the core of our current economic model, which results in scarcity for the many, and unimaginable wealth for the few. The economic fallout from the pandemic and the inadequacy of governments’ responses to it are prompting more and more people to question the morality of an economic system which for decades has placed the market at the centre of all human interactions, measuring progress and development solely in terms of economic growth. In this publication, the Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR) and Christian Aid – two international organisations working for human rights and economic justice – ask: what would it would look like if we had an economy based on human rights?

Whose Green Recovery Report

A new report from development charity Christian Aid has warned that post-Covid stimulus packages are in danger of widening global inequality and pushing poorer countries to turn to fossil fuels which would threaten the success of the UK’s COP26 climate summit. The report, Whose Green Recovery, analyses the various economic stimulus plans around the world. The report reveals that: There is a dangerous lack of policies that will help developing countries, potentially wiping out climate gains in the Global North More than half a trillion dollars going to carbon-intensive industries Failure to add bailout conditions which would accelerate the zero carbon transition The report outlines what a truly global green recovery would look like, featuring debt cancelation, fossil fuel subsidy removal and greater investment in overseas renewables rather than fossil fuels.

Black Lives Matter Everywhere

Apart from the Covid-19 pandemic, the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement has been one of the defining themes of 2020. Sparked by the death of George Floyd and other examples of police brutality in the United States, it quickly spread to include a wider debate about racial inequalities around the world. Climate change, although something which will affect us all, is a deeply racialised phenomenon. Black and brown people in the poorest countries face the brunt of the impacts, caused in large part by fossil fuel burning in rich, majority-White nations. But this inequality is often overlooked because climate change is associated with science and the language used to describe it is often technical jargon relating to atmospheric carbon atoms and global temperature readings. The cold neutrality of climate science obscures the fact that the drivers and impacts of the climate emergency are personal and societal, and tied to political decisions with clear racial implications. People in the, as-yet, more sheltered corners of the global North are now starting to experience the force of the climate crisis, but across the global South it is something they have already been feeling the effects of for years. Be they extreme weather events in Latin America, droughts in East Africa, floods in Bangladesh or sea level rise threatening the existence of Pacific Islands, climate change is not just a future threat but a present reality. Climate change and its disproportionate effects on those that have done the least to cause it has been known about for decades. And yet emissions continue to rise. If poor political decisions and unjust policies have helped to cause the climate crisis, then it’s equally the case that the right policies and decisions have an essential role to play in addressing the problem and putting the world on a path to climate justice. We’re beginning to see such movement, although not nearly fast enough. Politicians around the world have claimed to be moved by racial injustice. Making rapid and far reaching climate action a priority would be a good start in ensuring black lives matter everywhere.

Building Back with Justice

Building Back with Justice sets out the actions governments must take to ensure that any global recovery from Covid-19 is one that tackles inequalities, addresses the climate crisis and sets us on a path to a different future.

Song of the prophets

A global theology of climate change

Tipping Point report

This report explores how the Covid-19 pandemic threatens to push the world's poorest to the brink of survival.

Equality at All Levels report

A report from Christian Aid calling for faith actors and secular feminists to join forces to push for global equality for women.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Arabic)

This Arabic-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (English)

This paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Partnerships for humanitarian action: challenges for large INGOs

Read the notes from the January 2020 roundtable held to discuss the challenges for large INGOs without a traditional partnership approach. This paper contains: Notes from the roundtable, co-hosted by the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships programme and the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) of ODI, in January 2020. The roundtable aimed to discuss the challenges for large international NGOs, without a traditional partnership approach, moving towards partnerships in humanitarian contexts in pursuit of localisation.

Use and abuse of tax breaks: how tax incentives become harmful

Taxation is essential to raise sufficient, equitable and accountable financing for development. Only through taxation can governments fund public spending on the essential services at the quality and scale necessary to realise the rights of all citizens. Yet many Southern governments decide not to tax certain corporations and companies in the hope that this will attract cross-border investment. Despite mounting evidence that the practice of offering tax incentives is both largely ineffective and detrimental to development, it is widespread. This report explains how tax incentives can become harmful, and discusses what can be done to stop their abuse.

Modern Slavery Act

To tackle the root causes of modern slavery is to tackle the root causes of economic and social inequality. This Modern Slavery Statement outlines our continued work in our own supply chains. We have reviewed progress from our previous statement in 2018-19, and set new targets and commitments for 2019-20 onwards You can also read our previous modern slavery statement

Pathways to Localisation: locally-led humanitarian action (English)

This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action.  It is informed by more than 400 humanitarian agencies – the majority of them local and national organisations – through research, piloting and the development of National Localisation Frameworks, in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan.  It outlines priority actions and a range of indicators under the areas of partnerships, capacity, financial resources, and coordination.  This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page. Who is it for? This paper is relevant for all those implementing and funding humanitarian response. It was developed as part of the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project implemented by Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD and Oxfam, guided by national steering committees, and funded by the European Commission’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) over 2017-2019.

Vers la localisation (Pathways to localisation - French)

Cadre visant à une intervention humanitaire menée à l’échelle locale et fondée sur le partenariat. This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page. Note de synthèse  Le Sommet Humanitaire Mondial (WHS) de 2016 a souligné le rôle primordial des acteurs locaux et nationaux dans l’intervention humanitaire. Les trois grandes séries d’engagements qui y ont été prises, à savoir le Programme d’Action pour l’Humanité (2016), le Grand Compromis (2016) et la Charte pour le Changement (2015), ont énoncé les changements ou les transformations nécessaires pour permettre aux acteurs locaux et nationaux de prendre davantage les rênes de l’action humanitaire.   À l’initiative du consortium formé de Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD et Oxfam, Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships est un programme orienté par les acteurs locaux et nationaux qui siègent dans des comités nationaux de pilotage. La Protection Civile et Opérations d’Aide de la Commission Européenne (ECHO) l’a financé de la fin 2017 à 2019. Ce programme s’inspire de travaux du consortium qui depuis 2012, par le biais de la série de rapports Missed Opportunities, visent à renforcer le rôle moteur des acteurs locaux et nationaux dans l’action humanitaire.   À l’issue de ses recherches, le programme Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships a mis en évidence un modèle fondé sur les pratiques de partenariat qui, selon les acteurs locaux/nationaux, favorisent le plus la localisation4. Pour les besoins de ces travaux, plus de 350 organisations au Myanmar, au Népal, au Nigeria et au Soudan du Sud, dont 85 % sont des organisations locales et nationales, ont été consultées. Elles ont permis aux membres du consortium et à leurs partenaires locaux de repérer, de valider et d’expérimenter un certain nombre de recommandations. Les leçons tirées de la phase d’expérimentation ont été regroupées avec les conclusions des auto-évaluations des capacités de plus d’une centaine d’acteurs locaux et nationaux. Les recherches, les leçons et les conclusions du programme ont façonné l’élaboration de cadres nationaux de localisation. Les acteurs locaux et nationaux, et d’autres intervenants humanitaires, y compris des ONG internationales, des agences des Nations Unies, des donateurs, les sociétés de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge, et les autorités gouvernementales concernées y ont également contribué.   Les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation sont adaptés au contexte très différencié des environnements opérationnels et des crises humanitaires au Myanmar, au Népal, au Nigeria et au Soudan du Sud. Les écarts notables entre les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation sont présentés dans ce document et reflètent la diversité des contextes. Les différences tiennent particulièrement au rôle des autorités gouvernementales dans la localisation. Cependant, ces quatre cadres ont en commun un certain nombre d’actions et de domaines prioritaires, dont plusieurs sont étroitement liés aux engagements, aux cadres et aux indicateurs de localisation existants et cités en référence. Alors que le programme Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships était axé sur l’action humanitaire fondée sur le partenariat, les cadres nationaux de localisation sont allés bien au-delà. Ce rapport présente les principaux domaines traités dans les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation, ainsi que leurs objectifs, leurs actions prioritaires et leurs indicateurs potentiels.  Note d’orientation sur les pratiques de partenariat en vue de la localisation.

Caminos hacia la localización (Pathways to localisation - Spanish)

Un marco para la respuesta de acción humanitariadirigida localmente en una acción basada en la asociación. This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page.   Resumen ejecutivo  El papel esencial de los actores locales y nacionales en la respuesta humanitaria se resaltó en la Cumbre Mundial Humanitaria (‘World Humanitarian Summit’) de 2016. Los cambios o transformaciones necesarias para que los actores locales y nacionales puedan asumir un mayor liderazgo en la acción humanitaria se esbozaron en los tres grandes conjuntos de compromisos aprobados en la cumbre: Agenda para la Humanidad (2016), el Gran Acuerdo (2016), y El Estatuto para el Cambio (2015). Acelerar la Localización a través de las Asociaciones es un programa de consorcio de Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD, Oxfam y guiado por actores locales y nacionales en los comités directivos nacionales. Está financiado por la Oficina Europea de Ayuda Humanitaria y Protección Civil (ECHO) de la Comisión Europea desde finales de 2017 hasta 2019. Este programa se ha basado en el trabajo ya realizado por el consorcio con el objetivo de fortalecer el liderazgo de los actores locales y nacionales en la acción humanitaria desde 2012 a través de la serie de trabajos Missed Opportunities.  El programa Acelerar la Localización a través de las Asociaciones llevó a cabo una investigación para identificar un modelo de asociación que consiste en prácticas de asociación que los actores locales/nacionales consideran más propicias para la localización4. Esta investigación consultó a más de 350 organizaciones en Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria y Sudán del Sur - 85% de las cuales eran organizaciones locales y nacionales - y las recomendaciones fueron identificadas, validadas y probadas por los miembros del consorcio y los socios locales. Las enseñanzas de la fase piloto se cotejaron con las conclusiones de las autoevaluaciones de la capacidad de más de 100 agentes locales y nacionales. La investigación, el aprendizaje y los resultados del programa sirvieron de base para el desarrollo de los marcos nacionales de localización con las contribuciones de los actores locales y nacionales y otras partes interesadas en la ayuda humanitaria, incluidas las ONG internacionales, los organismos de las Naciones Unidas, los donantes, las sociedades de la Cruz/Media Luna Roja y las autoridades gubernamentales pertinentes.  Los cuatro marcos nacionales de localización se adaptan al contexto específico de los muy diferentes entornos operativos y crisis humanitarias en Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria y Sudán del sur. Las notables diferencias entre los cuatro marcos nacionales de localización se esbozan en este documento y reflejan los diversos contextos; difieren particularmente en relación con el papel de las autoridades gubernamentales en la localización.  Sin embargo, hay una serie de acciones y áreas prioritarias comunes a los cuatro marcos, muchas de las cuales están estrechamente relacionadas con los compromisos, marcos e indicadores de localización existentes a los que se hace referencia. Aunque el objetivo de Acelerar la Localización a través de las Asociaciones era la acción humanitaria basada en las asociaciones, los marcos nacionales de localización han ido más allá. Las áreas clave incluidas en los cuatro marcos nacionales de localización se describen en el documento, junto con los objetivos, las acciones prioritarias y los indicadores potenciales.  Prácticas de las asociaciones para la localización; una nota de orientación