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Guidance on whistleblowing

It is the duty of every employee to speak up about genuine concerns in relation to criminal activity, breach of legal obligation (including negligence, breach of contract, breach of administrative law, miscarriage of justice, danger to health and safety or environment) and the cover up of any of these in the workplace. Christian Aid is committed to ensuring that any employee's concerns of this nature will be taken seriously and investigated, and as part of this commitment has developed this guidance note on whistleblowing.

Safeguarding policy

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of

How Christian Aid pays its staff

The effective stewardship of resources is core to the vision and values that underpin Christian Aid’s work in seeking to bring about a fairer, more equitable world. We recognise the important responsibility we have to the poor communities we work with, our donors, supporters and the general public, to ensure we are open and transparent on how we use the funds that are so generously donated for the work we undertake.  We are committed to ensuring value for money in everything we do and this includes how we remunerate our staff. We operate a policy that is fair, equitable and consistent to attract, motivate and retain capable staff that have the skills and experience we require to implement the work we do.  What are our pay principles? Our salaries are set within in a policy that reflects the values and ethos of the organisation, benchmarking against other comparable charities and church organisations at a level that is just below or at the median of these comparators. The basic principle for determining salaries is that employees carrying out the same or similar jobs in the same location are paid the same or similar salary. Salaries differ where jobs are of a different size, complexity, responsibility and accountability. Tackling global poverty and social injustice is highly complex and we value the contribution that each individual employee makes to our organisation’s success. Our approach to reward is guided by the following principles which are applied equally to all our staff wherever they are located and whatever their position:  We will provide a total reward package which recognises contribution to the achievement of our aims. Our reward offering will be competitive in the marketplace from which we draw the people we need.  The reward decisions we make will be consistent and based on objective assessment of our organisational needs.  Wherever we can we will offer flexibility and choice so that individuals can achieve what is most relevant and has most value to them.  We will make arrangements which comply fully with relevant legislation wherever we are operating. How is pay governed? The implementation of our remuneration policy, which is set by the Board, is overseen by the Remuneration Committee. This committee has delegated authority to provide governance oversight and input on all matters concerning the principles and policies governing the pay and benefits of Christian Aid staff. Its responsibilities include: To consider any suggested changes to those principles and policies and make recommendations to the Board. To make recommendations to the Board for any necessary adjustments, consistent with affordability within agreed budget parameters. To collect and consider evidence of movements in the external pay market as it affects Christian Aid, and to make recommendations to the Board for any necessary adjustments required to ensure Christian Aid is able to recruit and retain appropriately skilled staff to implement its strategy effectively. To make recommendations from time to time to the Board on the broad policy framework and overall costs of the remuneration of the Chief Executive and the Directors and to determine the salary of the Chief Executive. Our lower salary band for all employed staff in the UK and Ireland is above the Living Wage, as is the salary of all third party contracted cleaning staff employed in our UK and Ireland regional and national offices. Christian is an accredited “Living Wage Employer”. For salaries of staff based in the UK and Ireland, the Board has adopted the “Hutton Fair Pay Review” recommendation which limits the differential of pay between the highest paid person and others, using a ratio based on the median salary. The Board has set this ratio at 4:1 on UK salaries. The salaries for our internationally based staff are set within their local employment market, against a benchmark of other comparable organisations, consistent with our overall remuneration policy. Further information on what we currently spend on salaries, including the salary of the Chief Executive, can be found in our 2016/17 Annual Report. How much is Christian Aid’s Chief Executive paid? Christian Aid’s Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi, earned £132,000 last year. We recognise that this is a large sum of money. Christian Aid makes every effort to avoid paying higher salaries than are necessary. We pay our staff salaries the same as, or below, the median of other church-based and/or international development agencies. A recent survey of UK charities showed that we pay significantly below the average pay of £167,000 for CEO’s of the top 100 charities, in terms of income, in the country. The Chief Executive role carries an immense amount of responsibility. This includes the stewardship, governance and oversight of how we spend our £106m annual income, the welfare of up to 900 staff and the projects we support to help lift millions of people out of poverty. Within Christian Aid we are committed to the idea that transparency empowers – that’s why we’re already one of the most transparent organisations in the sector. We’ve always been clear on who earns what and we’re accredited with the highest international standards of transparency. How do we manage annual pay reviews? Each year, Christian Aid conducts an annual pay review of staff salaries. In the UK and Ireland we calculate inflation rates using the average of Average Weekly Earnings Index (AWE) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Any inflationary award or other necessary adjustments made on salaries are subject to affordability. For our internationally based staff we use country data from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for calculating cost of living increases for country offices. Adjustments are implemented on April 1. Contact us

Safeguarding policy, Portuguese (PDF)

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of the children and adults. The guiding principle of our Safeguarding Policy, here translated into Portuguese, is that Christian Aid believes that it is always unacceptable for children, young people, or adults to experience any kind of abuse.

Safeguarding policy, French (PDF)

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of the children and adults. The guiding principle of our Safeguarding Policy, here translated into French, is that Christian Aid believes that it is always unacceptable for children, young people, or adults to experience any kind of abuse.

Safeguarding policy, Spanish (PDF)

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of the children and adults. The guiding principle of our Safeguarding Policy, here translated into Spanish, is that Christian Aid believes that it is always unacceptable for children, young people, or adults to experience any kind of abuse.

Christian Aid’s gender pay gap report 2017-2018

A report from our CEO, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi, on the gender pay gap at Christian Aid.

Christian Aid Open Information Policy

Our Open Information Policy governs our approach to sharing information with external stakeholders; it provides the standards and principles that guide how we operate and the types of mechanisms that exist to access information. It also explains why there is some information that we will not share. To learn more, visit our Open Information Policy page. 

Resilience framework

Our Resilience Framework sets out how we work with partners to support communities to identify the risks they face, access resources and effectively to achieve sustainable results.

Resilience case studies

The following nine case studies illustrate how we interpret resilience – as a means of putting communities and individuals at the centre of their own development.

Comment Christian Aid évalue le rapport qualité-prix dans ses programmes

Pour Christian Aid, un bon rapport qualité-prix ne consiste pas à rechercher la solution la moins coûteuse possible, à moins qu’elle soit également la plus efficace et la plus inclusive. (French language value for money report.)

Cómo evalúa Christian Aid el mejor valor por el dinero en sus programas

Para Christian Aid, el valor por el dinero no consiste en buscar la opción más barata posible, a menos que esta sea también la opción más eficaz e inclusiva. (Spanish language value for money report.)

Improving Impact: Do accountability mechanisms deliver results?

This research seeks to contribute evidence for the value of introducing accountability mechanisms into projects, and demonstrate the importance of promoting them.

Christian Aid accountability framework

Christian Aid’s Essential Purpose is to expose the scandal of poverty, to help in practical ways to root it out from the world, and to challenge and change the systems that favour the rich and powerful over the poor and marginalised. We are an agency of 41 churches in Britain and Ireland and are mandated to work on relief, development and advocacy for poverty eradication. We work with and through partners overseas:  churches, ecumenical bodies, local NGOs and movements who have common values and who we recognise to be in the best position to identify and deliver support and assistance to the communities that they work with.  Accountability is vital to upholding our Christian based values and for maintaining our legitimacy and credibility to speak out so that it fully supports our Essential Purpose. We aim to hold ourselves openly responsible, in ways that involve our key stakeholders, for what we believe, what we do and say we will do – and for showing what we have done compared to what we said we would do. Doing this enables us to get feedback on what works and what doesn’t, and what we need to improve. This increases the likelihood of success in our work with poor communities and enhances a sense of ownership among all our stakeholders. It also reduces the potential for inefficient use or misuse of the resources entrusted to us. 

How Christian Aid assesses value for money in its programmes

Christian Aid is committed to seeing an end to poverty. In order to achieve this, we need to focus on attaining results for women and men living in poverty. To maximise our impact and bring about changes at the scale to which we aspire, we need to focus on using our resources as effectively as we possibly can – literally, achieving the best value for money (VfM). While we need to manage financial and other resources sensibly and efficiently, what really matters is using them to bring about as significant a change as possible for poor and marginalised women and men.  Further resources:  Value for money (French) Value for money (Spanish) Value for money case studies