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Christian Aid Guide to Gifts in Wills

Christian Aid Guide to Gifts in Wills

Doing research ethically

A guide and toolkit for doing research and evaluation in an ethical way for international development practitioners and evaluators

Modern Slavery Statement

Christian Aid's Modern Slavery Statement

Window on the World

This resource, designed for primary school teachers, looks at the effects of climate change around the world and close to home.

Taking Action on Climate Justice

A conversation guide for church groups, to help equip you to take action.

Our Prophetic Journey Towards Climate Justice

Climate stories from black church leaders to inspire positive action.

In Their Lifetime January 2021

In Their Lifetime January 2021

Counting the cost 2020: a year of climate breakdown

Identifying 15 of the most destructive climate disasters of the year.

Guidance on whistleblowing

It is the duty of every employee to speak up about genuine concerns in relation to criminal activity, breach of legal obligation (including negligence, breach of contract, breach of administrative law, miscarriage of justice, danger to health and safety or environment) and the cover up of any of these in the workplace. Christian Aid is committed to ensuring that any employee's concerns of this nature will be taken seriously and investigated, and as part of this commitment has developed this guidance note on whistleblowing.

Safeguarding policy

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of

Research Design resource

This is a guide to help practitioners develop and design a research or evaluation project. It sets out different sections to fill out to help guide you through this process and includes further questions to help you think through the research design process in more detail.  

A Rights-Based Economy Report

The COVID-19 pandemic has shone a spotlight on the fundamental injustice at the core of our current economic model, which results in scarcity for the many, and unimaginable wealth for the few. The economic fallout from the pandemic and the inadequacy of governments’ responses to it are prompting more and more people to question the morality of an economic system which for decades has placed the market at the centre of all human interactions, measuring progress and development solely in terms of economic growth. In this publication, the Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR) and Christian Aid – two international organisations working for human rights and economic justice – ask: what would it would look like if we had an economy based on human rights?

Christian Aid and United Nations World Food Programme Partnership

Christian Aid is working with the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to fight extreme hunger in conflict-affected communities. Find out more about the programme and how your support can go even further thanks to a co-funding partnership with WFP.

Whose Green Recovery

A report outlining what a global green recovery would look like.

Black Lives Matter Everywhere

Apart from the Covid-19 pandemic, the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement has been one of the defining themes of 2020. Sparked by the death of George Floyd and other examples of police brutality in the United States, it quickly spread to include a wider debate about racial inequalities around the world. Climate change, although something which will affect us all, is a deeply racialised phenomenon. Black and brown people in the poorest countries face the brunt of the impacts, caused in large part by fossil fuel burning in rich, majority-White nations. But this inequality is often overlooked because climate change is associated with science and the language used to describe it is often technical jargon relating to atmospheric carbon atoms and global temperature readings. The cold neutrality of climate science obscures the fact that the drivers and impacts of the climate emergency are personal and societal, and tied to political decisions with clear racial implications. People in the, as-yet, more sheltered corners of the global North are now starting to experience the force of the climate crisis, but across the global South it is something they have already been feeling the effects of for years. Be they extreme weather events in Latin America, droughts in East Africa, floods in Bangladesh or sea level rise threatening the existence of Pacific Islands, climate change is not just a future threat but a present reality. Climate change and its disproportionate effects on those that have done the least to cause it has been known about for decades. And yet emissions continue to rise. If poor political decisions and unjust policies have helped to cause the climate crisis, then it’s equally the case that the right policies and decisions have an essential role to play in addressing the problem and putting the world on a path to climate justice. We’re beginning to see such movement, although not nearly fast enough. Politicians around the world have claimed to be moved by racial injustice. Making rapid and far reaching climate action a priority would be a good start in ensuring black lives matter everywhere.