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Modern Slavery Statement

Christian Aid's Modern Slavery Statement

Modern Slavery Act

To tackle the root causes of modern slavery is to tackle the root causes of economic and social inequality. This Modern Slavery Statement outlines our continued work in our own supply chains. We have reviewed progress from our previous statement in 2018-19, and set new targets and commitments for 2019-20 onwards You can also read our previous modern slavery statement

Keeping the SDGs on track

Detailing how the three basic SDG principles can be put into practice by improving accountability mechanisms under the High Level Political Forum .

Corporate approaches to addressing modern day slavery

Download this report providing a snapshot of corporate approaches to modern day slavery based on research of 21 leading brands and retailers. From the Ethical Trading Initiative and The Ashridge Centre for Business and Sustainability at Hult International Business School.

Tackling modern day slavery - the John Lewis Partnership

Download this report from the John Lewis Partnership outlining their business and human rights strategy in response to the Modern Slavery Act. From the Salt Business Network. 

A FAIR deal for IDPs 4: Agenda 2030

Agenda 2030 offers an unrivalled chance to ensure that response and aid delivers for IDPs. What does it need to succeed?

A FAIR deal for IDPs 3: Funding

How can we address the root causes of - and put an end to - long-term displacement?

LPRR final evaluation report

The Linking Preparedness, Response and Resilience (LPRR) project, which is part of the DFID funded Disasters Emergencies Preparedness Programme (DEPP), was carried out from 2015 to the end of March 2018. The project was delivered by a consortium led by Christian Aid, which included Action Aid, Concern, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Safer World, and World Vision. The LPRR project brings together the expertise of response and resilience professionals (and frameworks) in order to support communities affected by emergencies and at the risk of violence. The consortium was present through a research component in eight countries, namely Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Philippines, Colombia, Indonesia, with pilot projects in Kenya, Pakistan and Myanmar. The project was delivered through three distinct strands: conflict prevention, humanitarian response, and learning.

LPRR knowledge co-development paper

Co-production is a process through which partners draw upon their own learning to feed into a collective knowledge creation process. It fits well within international development, humanitarian and resilience-building processes, where the multi-partner nature of many current projects ensures there is a multiplicity of perspectives that can be drawn upon. It can also be democratic – where all forms of knowledge are valued – and so create ownership; work to find a balance between theory and practice and strengthen (and build) technical capacity and process Co-production was explicitly employed in the Linking Preparedness, Resilience and Response (LPRR) project, part of the DFID funded Disasters and Emergencies, Preparedness Programme (DEPP). It explored how humanitarian response can be strengthened to enable (and not undermine) long term community resilience building. Christian Aid (CA) led the project with seven consortium partners – World Vision, Action Aid, Help Age International, Concern, Oxfam and Muslim Aid. The project collaborated with King's College London (KCL) who led the research function. The purpose of this practice paper is three-fold: To explore the learning environment amongst consortium partners i.e. group learning and the tools and processes employed to facilitate this To detail the challenges and enablers of an implementing NGOs, Christian Aid and other consortium partners, co-producing knowledge with an academic institute, KCL; and To assess how the project helped to build capacity amongst relevant agencies – including in-country partners.

LPRR: Empowering communities to lead humanitarian response

The DFID DEPP funded LPRR consortium is led by Christian Aid and includes Action Aid, Concern Worldwide, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Saferworld and World Vision. It aims to increase preparedness and resilience capacity in conflict and response settings. As part of the project, King’s College London University designed and implemented a study in Bangladesh, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Kenya, Pakistan and the Philippines. It was one of the rare approaches which specifically asked 327 crises survivors and first responders from past humanitarian emergencies to draw upon their own experience and expertise to guide improved humanitarian response programming for long term resilience.

A FAIR deal for IDPs 2: Respect the laws protecting uprooted people

How can the laws to protect internally displaced people (IDPs) be respected?

Working effectively with faith leaders - harmful traditional practices

In 2016, the United Kingdom’s (UK) Department for International Development released a call for proposals for a study entitled “Working effectively with faith leaders to challenge harmful traditional practices.” A Consortium of the Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities, an international alliance examining the contribution of faith groups to community health and wellbeing, undertook this study to investigate best practices around engaging with faith leaders on harmful traditional practices (HTPs). This study is currently on-going and will continue until 2018.

A FAIR deal for IDPs 1: Leave no one behind

How can we make sure that the rights and needs of internally displaced persons (IDPs) are no longer overlooked?

The Salt Newsletter Feb 2017

Download the Salt Business Network's first newsletter and find out how these value-led business leaders are standing up to global poverty.