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Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part One - Guide

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the ECID programme.

Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part Two - Toolkit

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the Evidence and Collaboration for Inclusive Development (ECID) programme, funded by UK Aid.

Our Prophetic Journey Towards Climate Justice

Climate stories from black church leaders to inspire positive action.

Tipping Point report

This report explores how the Covid-19 pandemic threatens to push the world's poorest to the brink of survival.

Equality at All Levels report

A report from Christian Aid calling for faith actors and secular feminists to join forces to push for global equality for women.

Generando Empresas y Derechos Humanos

Las prácticas corporativas irresponsables representan graves riesgos para los derechos humanos. A menudo, tienen impactos que afectan a las personas de manera diferente debido a su género, haciendo que las desigualdades que ya experimentan sean aún mayores. En este informe, identificamos estudios de casos, destacamos temas clave sobre el impacto de género de las prácticas corporativas y exploramos su relación con el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos y los marcos relacionados. Creemos que las empresas, en particular las empresas transnacionales, deben hacer valer los derechos humanos y deben ser responsabilizadas por el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos. También creemos que el Marco de Negocios y Derechos Humanos de la ONU, sus mecanismos de implementación, y los estados y entidades comerciales a los que se aplica, deben responder mejor a los impactos negativos de las empresas en los derechos de las mujeres y los géneros marginados.

Engendering Business and Human Rights

Irresponsible corporate practices pose serious human rights risks. Often, they have impacts which affect people differently because of their gender, making the inequalities that they already experience even greater. In this report, we identify case studies, highlight key issues on the gendered impact of corporate practices, and explore their relationship with international human rights law and related frameworks. We believe that businesses, in particular transnational corporations, must bring human rights to bear and must be held to account under international human rights law. We also believe that the UN Business and Human Rights Framework, its implementation mechanisms, and the states and business entities to which it applies, must respond better to the negative impacts of business on the rights of women and marginalised genders.

Integrated Conflict Prevention and Resilience Field Guide

This is a field guide for staff implementing the guidance laid out in the Integrated Conflict Prevention and Resilience Handbook. It summarises key points from the handbook and lays out a series of top tips and guiding questions for project and programme staff working in conflict-affected contexts. It aims to help staff to integrate a conflict-sensitive approach into key stages of programme design and implementation.

Integrated Conflict Prevention and Resilience Handbook

When communities are affected by conflict, they are more vulnerable to a wide range of other shocks and stresses, including natural hazards. Likewise, the ability of a community to manage tensions and withstand shocks, without a significant increase in conflict, can be seen as a key indicator of that community’s resilience. Poorly planned development or humanitarian interventions can also contribute to an increase in conflict. Therefore it is important that preventing conflict must form a key component of any intervention that genuinely seeks to build community resilience. This guide will support agencies to strengthen community resilience more effectively in conflict-affected contexts. It does so by providing step-by-step guidance on how to integrate a conflict-sensitive approach into pre-existing and commonly-applied resilience-strengthening methodologies. It is, to our knowledge, the first time that specific guidance of this kind has been developed.

January meditation

A prayer and blessing to welcome the dawn of the New Year with hope. 

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 2)

A debilitating drought may bring riots and social unrest in one country, but in a neighbouring country, the same problem may be dealt with by citizen mobilisation towards collective action solutions. To a large extent, governance capacity and community resilience explains the nature and structure of the response. In this report, three case studies – from Angola, Mali, and Honduras – of actual responses to climate change and conflict are presented.

Christian Aid Health strategy 2017-20

A strategy for Christian Aid's health work globally

No more harmful traditional practices: working with faith leaders

In 2017 a consortium of members of the Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities (JLI) undertook a study funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), entitled ‘Working effectively with faith leaders to challenge harmful traditional practices'. The United Nations has defined harmful traditional practices (HTPs) as follows: Traditional cultural practices reflect values and beliefs held by members of a community for periods often spanning generations. Every social grouping in the world has specific traditional cultural practices and beliefs, some of which are beneficial to all members, while others are harmful to a specific group, such as women. These harmful traditional practices include female genital mutilation (FGM); forced feeding of women; early marriage; the various taboos or practices which prevent women from controlling their own fertility; nutritional taboos and traditional birth practices; son preference and its implications for the status of the girl child; female infanticide; early pregnancy; and dowry price. Despite their harmful nature and their violation of international human rights laws, such practices persist because they are not questioned and take on an aura of morality in the eyes of those practicing them. Faith leaders are men and women recognised by their faith community, both formally or informally, as playing authoritative and influential leadership roles within faith institutions to guide, inspire or lead others (of faith). This may be within a formal religious hierarchy of accountability, but also includes informal movements. This report serves as a synthesis of the study findings.

Working effectively with faith leaders - harmful traditional practices

In 2016, the United Kingdom’s (UK) Department for International Development released a call for proposals for a study entitled “Working effectively with faith leaders to challenge harmful traditional practices.” A Consortium of the Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities, an international alliance examining the contribution of faith groups to community health and wellbeing, undertook this study to investigate best practices around engaging with faith leaders on harmful traditional practices (HTPs). This study is currently on-going and will continue until 2018.

Christian Aid management response – health integration research

The health integration research positioned Christian Aid’s health work well within the global health policy arena and comparatively against other INGOs. It highlighted a number of strengths and areas of expertise of our work. It detailed recommendations for us to leverage upon these strengths to access funding and gain more recognition for our work globally. The research provided definitions of the different types of integration into which our health work fits, namely integrated within wider development strategies, integration at various levels within a health system (from national to community) and health issue level, i.e. disease integration. This is useful in helping CA to understand the multiple ways in which our programmes are integrated and to utilise this to build our work further. This paper features recommendations from research.

Leave noone behind and global equity

In this briefing, Christian Aid asks how wealthier countries might report appropriately on action being taken to promote greater global equity.  

What is helping communities mobilise resources? PVCA learning review

Christian Aid (CA) conducted this learning review to understand how Participatory, Vulnerability and Capacity Assessments (PVCAs) have helped communities pull funding, resources and services from actors such as the state, private sector, donors and NGOs in the context of the Programme Partnership Arrangement (PPA) programme.

Community health in a global context

In 2016, Christian Aid commissioned a research report entitled ‘Putting Christian Aid’s approach to Community Health Integration into a Global Context’. The research was funded by the PPA and sought to reflect on Christian Aid’s approach to health integration and compare that to global health policy and priorities. The research provides recommendations for Christian Aid to continue to strengthen our integrated health programmes. This is a summary of the report, which contains the key strategic and programmatic recommendations.Understanding integration and the changing context of health