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Modern Slavery Statement

Christian Aid's Modern Slavery Statement

Modern Slavery Act

To tackle the root causes of modern slavery is to tackle the root causes of economic and social inequality. This Modern Slavery Statement outlines our continued work in our own supply chains. We have reviewed progress from our previous statement in 2018-19, and set new targets and commitments for 2019-20 onwards You can also read our previous modern slavery statement

Corporate approaches to addressing modern day slavery

Download this report providing a snapshot of corporate approaches to modern day slavery based on research of 21 leading brands and retailers. From the Ethical Trading Initiative and The Ashridge Centre for Business and Sustainability at Hult International Business School.

Tackling modern day slavery - the John Lewis Partnership

Download this report from the John Lewis Partnership outlining their business and human rights strategy in response to the Modern Slavery Act. From the Salt Business Network. 

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 2)

A debilitating drought may bring riots and social unrest in one country, but in a neighbouring country, the same problem may be dealt with by citizen mobilisation towards collective action solutions. To a large extent, governance capacity and community resilience explains the nature and structure of the response. In this report, three case studies – from Angola, Mali, and Honduras – of actual responses to climate change and conflict are presented.

No more harmful traditional practices: working with faith leaders

In 2017 a consortium of members of the Joint Learning Initiative on Faith and Local Communities (JLI) undertook a study funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), entitled ‘Working effectively with faith leaders to challenge harmful traditional practices'. The United Nations has defined harmful traditional practices (HTPs) as follows: Traditional cultural practices reflect values and beliefs held by members of a community for periods often spanning generations. Every social grouping in the world has specific traditional cultural practices and beliefs, some of which are beneficial to all members, while others are harmful to a specific group, such as women. These harmful traditional practices include female genital mutilation (FGM); forced feeding of women; early marriage; the various taboos or practices which prevent women from controlling their own fertility; nutritional taboos and traditional birth practices; son preference and its implications for the status of the girl child; female infanticide; early pregnancy; and dowry price. Despite their harmful nature and their violation of international human rights laws, such practices persist because they are not questioned and take on an aura of morality in the eyes of those practicing them. Faith leaders are men and women recognised by their faith community, both formally or informally, as playing authoritative and influential leadership roles within faith institutions to guide, inspire or lead others (of faith). This may be within a formal religious hierarchy of accountability, but also includes informal movements. This report serves as a synthesis of the study findings.

Faith leaders and family planning report

A report into the major barriers and opportunities for faith leaders engaging with their communities on family planning.

Building the future of humanitarian aid

Many more people will survive and recover from emergencies if international aid agencies boost local organisations’ ability to respond.