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Gender lens to the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights briefing

In this briefing, ACT Alliance sets out its analysis and recommendations concerning the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights ahead of the negotiations taking place in October 2019.  Business principles do not always converge with human rights principles. In various dimensions, from violence against women, to women’s economic participation, to tax, trade and investment, the gendered disparities are not resolved uniquely by market participation and growth dynamics. In fact, the growth-based model often puts women and other individuals who are marginalised in disadvantageous positions, ie, trapped in poverty, in unequal power relations and subject to abuse and violence. We believe that in order to ensure respect for human rights, we need binding rules on business and human rights at all levels, including respect for human rights, conducting meaningful human rights due diligence and adequate reporting, as well as access to remedy for victims of human rights abuses.

An economy of life briefing

An economy of life: How transforming the economy can tackle inequalities, bring climate justice and build a sustainable future Our vision is that global institutions genuinely represent and are accountable to the interests of everyone, not just the rich and powerful. This means confronting the institutional structures, including the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF), cultural norms and power imbalances that work together to maintain the status quo. We need to look for new expressions of economic life. Measures of economic growth overlook human and environmental wellbeing. It is time re-evaluate. This briefing challenges the World Bank and IMF to be part of this change and to become of a progressive and positive force in an economic future that leaves no one behind and is beneficial for nature and the climate.

ACT Gender Security Guidelines: threats to men, women and LGBTI staff

The global context for humanitarians is becoming more challenging. With targeted attacks on aid workers increasing in recent years, including the rise of reported sexual violence within the sector, our duty of care for staff is ever more important. Sexual violence is never the fault of the survivor. We should remain aware of this when undertaking prevention training, avoiding any tendency to ‘victim blame’.

Guide: Integrating gender into inclusive markets development programmes

Women smallholder farmers are typically at the base of the agricultural economy. This guide outlines how you can integrate gender into inclusive markets development programmes.

Leave No One Behind and Global Equity: Reviewing our shared commitments

Briefing released during the UN High Level Political Forum 2016, about our shared commitments to the Sustainable Development Goals.

Resilience framework

Our Resilience Framework sets out how we work with partners to support communities to identify the risks they face, access resources and effectively to achieve sustainable results.

Delivering for women and girls: role of gender responsive budgeting

This briefing lays out our recommendations for budgeting, which champions the rights of women and girls.

Power Analysis: Programme practice

This guide for Christian Aid staff and partners explains what power is, why it is important, how and when to implement power analysis, and which tools to use.

Minimum Standards for Age and Disability Inclusion in Humanitarian Action

Humanitarian actors must respond in a way that considers the needs of all people affected by a crisis.

Signposts to Copenhagen 6: integrating adaptation

One of series of short briefing papers presenting what we believe are the top issues for COP 15 in Copenhagen.  

Introduction to Power Analysis

Power analysis is the frameworks, principles, knowledge and tools for understanding those who have the abilities to create or resist change.

Christian Aid Good Practice Guide: Participatory vulnerability and capacity assessments (PVCA)

A participatory vulnerability and capacity assessment (PVCA) empowers poor people to analyse their problems and suggest their own solutions.