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Crazy Climate: all resources - English

Age: 7-11 Subject areas: Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)/Global Citizenship Geography/Environmental Studies Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE)/Personal, social and emotional development (PSED) Religious Education (RE)/Religious Studies (RS) Download all of our English language Crazy Climate resources. The pack includes: Activities Case studies Country profiles Climate facts A climate poster A presentation Teacher information Worksheets

Crazy Climate: all resources - Welsh

Age: 7-11 Subject areas: Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)/Global Citizenship Geography/Environmental Studies Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE)/Personal, social and emotional development (PSED) Religious Education (RE)/Religious Studies (RS) Download all of our Welsh language Crazy Climate resources. The pack includes: Activities Case studies Country profiles Climate facts A climate poster A presentation Teacher information Worksheets

Disaster Zone: all resources

Age: 9+ / youth group (11-18) This resource pack includes: An assembly Case studies Presentation Simulation game Teachers notes Worksheets

Crazy Climate classroom activities

Age: 7-11 Subject areas: Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)/Global Citizenship Geography/Environmental Studies Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE)/Personal, social and emotional development (PSED) Religious Education (RE)/Religious Studies (RS) This resource encourages pupils to think about the effects of climate change – who it affects most and how it affects them. But it is not all doom and gloom: it is instead an opportunity for change. Pupils will consider how they can help stop climate chaos through their own lifestyle choices. They will learn about how climate change affects children in other parts of the world and how Christian Aid’s work is helping to create a more sustainable world.

Crazy Climate classroom activities - Welsh

Age: 7-11 Subject areas: Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)/Global Citizenship Geography/Environmental Studies Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE)/Personal, social and emotional development (PSED) Religious Education (RE)/Religious Studies (RS) This resource encourages pupils to think about the effects of climate change – who it affects most and how it affects them. But it is not all doom and gloom: it is instead an opportunity for change. Pupils will consider how they can help stop climate chaos through their own lifestyle choices. They will learn about how climate change affects children in other parts of the world and how Christian Aid’s work is helping to create a more sustainable world.

Disaster alert: secondary school assembly

Age: 11-14 This 15-minute assembly will help pupils to understand more about disasters and can be used in response to a new disaster when it happens.

Disaster zone school presentation

Age: 9-14 This presentation introduces the topic of disasters and can be used alongside the disaster zone game.

Disaster zone: notes for teachers

Age: 11-14 These teaching notes are designed to help teachers prepare for the disaster zone game.

Disaster zone simulation game

Age: 9+ / Youth group (11-18) This simulation game challenges pupils to think about what they would do in emergency situations.  

Disaster zone case study: The Philippines

Age: 9+ / Youth group (11-18) This case study provides information on flooding that happened in the Philippines in 2012.

Disaster zone worksheet

Age: 9+ / Youth group (11-18) This worksheet provides a range of activities about disasters and emergencies.

Disaster strikes simulation game

Age: 7-11 but can easily be adapted for older age groups. The Typhoon Town Challenge game gives an insight into what life is like for a community located in a particularly poor part of Metro Manila, the capital region of the Philippines. In this game, pupils work together in teams to plan and build their perfect town. But they’ll have to make some tough budgeting choices along the way. What will they do when disaster strikes? How will they cope? And have they got what it takes to work as a team to rebuild?

Christian Aid in the Philippines: an exit learning review

Building climate resilience and strengthening civil society

Christian Aid Philippines: Typhoon Mangkhut Response Experience

An assessement of Christian Aid's emergency response to Typhoon Mangkhut (local name Ompong), which made landfall in Baggao, Cagayan, Northern Luzon, Philippines, early morning on Saturday 15 September 2018, with maximum sustained winds of 205 km/hr near the centre and gusts of up to 285 km/hr.

Disaster strikes: all resources

Age: 7-11 but can easily be adapted for older age groups. Download all of our Disaster strikes resources. The pack includes: An assembly Curriculum links Simulation game Teachers notes Worksheets

LPRR: Empowering communities to lead humanitarian response

The DFID DEPP funded LPRR consortium is led by Christian Aid and includes Action Aid, Concern Worldwide, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Saferworld and World Vision. It aims to increase preparedness and resilience capacity in conflict and response settings. As part of the project, King’s College London University designed and implemented a study in Bangladesh, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Kenya, Pakistan and the Philippines. It was one of the rare approaches which specifically asked 327 crises survivors and first responders from past humanitarian emergencies to draw upon their own experience and expertise to guide improved humanitarian response programming for long term resilience.

LPRR final evaluation report

The Linking Preparedness, Response and Resilience (LPRR) project, which is part of the DFID funded Disasters Emergencies Preparedness Programme (DEPP), was carried out from 2015 to the end of March 2018. The project was delivered by a consortium led by Christian Aid, which included Action Aid, Concern, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Safer World, and World Vision. The LPRR project brings together the expertise of response and resilience professionals (and frameworks) in order to support communities affected by emergencies and at the risk of violence. The consortium was present through a research component in eight countries, namely Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Philippines, Colombia, Indonesia, with pilot projects in Kenya, Pakistan and Myanmar. The project was delivered through three distinct strands: conflict prevention, humanitarian response, and learning.

LPRR knowledge co-development paper

Co-production is a process through which partners draw upon their own learning to feed into a collective knowledge creation process. It fits well within international development, humanitarian and resilience-building processes, where the multi-partner nature of many current projects ensures there is a multiplicity of perspectives that can be drawn upon. It can also be democratic – where all forms of knowledge are valued – and so create ownership; work to find a balance between theory and practice and strengthen (and build) technical capacity and process Co-production was explicitly employed in the Linking Preparedness, Resilience and Response (LPRR) project, part of the DFID funded Disasters and Emergencies, Preparedness Programme (DEPP). It explored how humanitarian response can be strengthened to enable (and not undermine) long term community resilience building. Christian Aid (CA) led the project with seven consortium partners – World Vision, Action Aid, Help Age International, Concern, Oxfam and Muslim Aid. The project collaborated with King's College London (KCL) who led the research function. The purpose of this practice paper is three-fold: To explore the learning environment amongst consortium partners i.e. group learning and the tools and processes employed to facilitate this To detail the challenges and enablers of an implementing NGOs, Christian Aid and other consortium partners, co-producing knowledge with an academic institute, KCL; and To assess how the project helped to build capacity amongst relevant agencies – including in-country partners.