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Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part One - Guide

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the ECID programme.

Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part Two - Toolkit

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the Evidence and Collaboration for Inclusive Development (ECID) programme, funded by UK Aid.

Inclusive Peacebuilding - English

Online Training of Trainers for Gender Sensitive Peacebuilding

Inclusive Peacebuilding - Burmese

Online Training of Trainers for Gender Sensitive Peacebuilding

Christian Aid in the Philippines: an exit learning review

Building climate resilience and strengthening civil society

Christian Aid Zimbabwe SMT

The team behind Christian Aid Zimbabwe

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Myanmar)

This Myanmar-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Partnership practices for localisation: guidance notes (Myanmar)

The top 23 partnership practices for localisation are listed in this guidance note. (Myanmar.) These notes are available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page.

Christian Aid Philippines: Typhoon Mangkhut Response Experience

An assessement of Christian Aid's emergency response to Typhoon Mangkhut (local name Ompong), which made landfall in Baggao, Cagayan, Northern Luzon, Philippines, early morning on Saturday 15 September 2018, with maximum sustained winds of 205 km/hr near the centre and gusts of up to 285 km/hr.

Accelerating localisation research summary - Myanmar-language version

Recommendations for practices that strengthen the leadership of national and local actors in partnership-based humanitarian action in Myanmar. Read the English-language version here

Accelerating localisation research summary - Myanmar

Recommendations for practices that strengthen the leadership of national and local actors in partnership-based humanitarian action in Myanmar. Read the Myanmar-language version here

Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management

Governance, gender, peace building and human rights Tackling the problems of poverty, vulnerability and exclusion that persist in parts of the world that continue to be affected by violence or political insecurity is difficult for several reasons. For one, because of the complexity of the prevailing social, economic and political systems, solutions to chronic problems are far from obvious. One response to this aspect of the challenge is adaptive programme design and management. This paper, 'Learning to make a difference: Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management in governance, gender, peace building and human rights', is the product of a multi-year collaboration between ODI and the core team of Christian Aid Ireland to assess the relevance of adaptive or trial-and-error approaches to the field of governance, peace building and human rights. It explains the basis on which Christian Aid Ireland’s current five-year programme funded by Irish Aid has become committed to an adaptive approach. It then describes and seeks to draw lessons from the programme’s first year of experience, considering the possible implications for implementation over the coming years.

LPRR: Humanitarian response strand learning paper

The Linking Preparedness, Response and Resilience, a DEPP funded, multi-agency project, supported seven local NGOs in Kenya and Myanmar to develop and pilot operational methodologies for supporting integrated community-led responses to humanitarian crises. The project was funded by the START network through UK aid and was led by Christian Aid. The approaches tested by the project were based on the research carried out by Kings College London (KCL), on the on-going action-research of carried out by Local to Global Protection (L2GP) and on the ideas, capacities and contexts of the LNGOs themselves. The pilots test the application of the recommendations made by communities as captured by the KCL research of how to improve humanitarian programming. This learning paper summarises the key findings to date from seven of these pilots in 3 local organisations from Marsabit County of Northern Kenya, two from NW Myanmar (Rakhine State) and two from SE Myanmar (Kayah and Kayin States). Given the small budgets for the pilots and the very short timeframes for their completion, they are the first step for the seven LNGOs to test and develop some of the components of the emerging ‘practice’ for facilitating locally-led emergency programming.

LPRR final evaluation report

The Linking Preparedness, Response and Resilience (LPRR) project, which is part of the DFID funded Disasters Emergencies Preparedness Programme (DEPP), was carried out from 2015 to the end of March 2018. The project was delivered by a consortium led by Christian Aid, which included Action Aid, Concern, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Safer World, and World Vision. The LPRR project brings together the expertise of response and resilience professionals (and frameworks) in order to support communities affected by emergencies and at the risk of violence. The consortium was present through a research component in eight countries, namely Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Philippines, Colombia, Indonesia, with pilot projects in Kenya, Pakistan and Myanmar. The project was delivered through three distinct strands: conflict prevention, humanitarian response, and learning.

LPRR knowledge co-development paper

Co-production is a process through which partners draw upon their own learning to feed into a collective knowledge creation process. It fits well within international development, humanitarian and resilience-building processes, where the multi-partner nature of many current projects ensures there is a multiplicity of perspectives that can be drawn upon. It can also be democratic – where all forms of knowledge are valued – and so create ownership; work to find a balance between theory and practice and strengthen (and build) technical capacity and process Co-production was explicitly employed in the Linking Preparedness, Resilience and Response (LPRR) project, part of the DFID funded Disasters and Emergencies, Preparedness Programme (DEPP). It explored how humanitarian response can be strengthened to enable (and not undermine) long term community resilience building. Christian Aid (CA) led the project with seven consortium partners – World Vision, Action Aid, Help Age International, Concern, Oxfam and Muslim Aid. The project collaborated with King's College London (KCL) who led the research function. The purpose of this practice paper is three-fold: To explore the learning environment amongst consortium partners i.e. group learning and the tools and processes employed to facilitate this To detail the challenges and enablers of an implementing NGOs, Christian Aid and other consortium partners, co-producing knowledge with an academic institute, KCL; and To assess how the project helped to build capacity amongst relevant agencies – including in-country partners.

LPRR: Philippines case study policy recommendations

In 2009, typhoon Ketsana hit the Philippines. Metro Manila was faced with a rapid onset flood from the typhoon rains and flooding of the Marikina and Nangka rivers. 455 mm of rainwater fell in 24 hours, killing 747 people and displacing hundreds of thousands of people.  In 2013, Typhoon Haiyan hit the central part of the Philippines affecting 14.1 million people, killing 6000 people and destroying more than 1 million homes. Linking Preparedness Resilience and Response in Emergency Contexts (LPRR) is a START DEPP DFID-funded three-year, consortium-led project which is aimed at strengthening humanitarian programming for more resilient communities. For this paper the communities include those living in the two study site areas: Taytay and Mahayag. The consortium is led by Christian Aid and includes Action Aid, Concern Worldwide, Help Age, Kings College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Saferworld and World Vision. The countries of focus include Kenya, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Democratic Republic Congo, Colombia, Indonesia and the Philippines and cover a multi-risk profile.

LPRR: Empowering communities to lead humanitarian response

The DFID DEPP funded LPRR consortium is led by Christian Aid and includes Action Aid, Concern Worldwide, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Saferworld and World Vision. It aims to increase preparedness and resilience capacity in conflict and response settings. As part of the project, King’s College London University designed and implemented a study in Bangladesh, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Kenya, Pakistan and the Philippines. It was one of the rare approaches which specifically asked 327 crises survivors and first responders from past humanitarian emergencies to draw upon their own experience and expertise to guide improved humanitarian response programming for long term resilience.