Skip to main content

We found 108

Showing 1 - 18

Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part One - Guide

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the ECID programme.

Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part Two - Toolkit

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the Evidence and Collaboration for Inclusive Development (ECID) programme, funded by UK Aid.

Tipping Point report

This report explores how the Covid-19 pandemic threatens to push the world's poorest to the brink of survival.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (English)

This paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Arabic)

This Arabic-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Partnerships for humanitarian action: challenges for large INGOs

Read the notes from the January 2020 roundtable held to discuss the challenges for large INGOs without a traditional partnership approach. This paper contains: Notes from the roundtable, co-hosted by the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships programme and the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) of ODI, in January 2020. The roundtable aimed to discuss the challenges for large international NGOs, without a traditional partnership approach, moving towards partnerships in humanitarian contexts in pursuit of localisation.

Use and abuse of tax breaks: how tax incentives become harmful

Taxation is essential to raise sufficient, equitable and accountable financing for development. Only through taxation can governments fund public spending on the essential services at the quality and scale necessary to realise the rights of all citizens. Yet many Southern governments decide not to tax certain corporations and companies in the hope that this will attract cross-border investment. Despite mounting evidence that the practice of offering tax incentives is both largely ineffective and detrimental to development, it is widespread. This report explains how tax incentives can become harmful, and discusses what can be done to stop their abuse.

Partnership practices for localisation: guidance notes (English)

The top 23 partnership practices for localisation are listed in this guidance note under the areas of project and financial management, capacity strengthening and sharing, financing, coordination, safety and security, and advocacy.  These notes are available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page.

Pathways to Localisation: locally-led humanitarian action (English)

This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action.  It is informed by more than 400 humanitarian agencies – the majority of them local and national organisations – through research, piloting and the development of National Localisation Frameworks, in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan.  It outlines priority actions and a range of indicators under the areas of partnerships, capacity, financial resources, and coordination.  This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page. Who is it for? This paper is relevant for all those implementing and funding humanitarian response. It was developed as part of the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project implemented by Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD and Oxfam, guided by national steering committees, and funded by the European Commission’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO) over 2017-2019.

Gender lens to the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights briefing

In this briefing, ACT Alliance sets out its analysis and recommendations concerning the UN Treaty on Business and Human Rights ahead of the negotiations taking place in October 2019.  Business principles do not always converge with human rights principles. In various dimensions, from violence against women, to women’s economic participation, to tax, trade and investment, the gendered disparities are not resolved uniquely by market participation and growth dynamics. In fact, the growth-based model often puts women and other individuals who are marginalised in disadvantageous positions, ie, trapped in poverty, in unequal power relations and subject to abuse and violence. We believe that in order to ensure respect for human rights, we need binding rules on business and human rights at all levels, including respect for human rights, conducting meaningful human rights due diligence and adequate reporting, as well as access to remedy for victims of human rights abuses.

An economy of life briefing

An economy of life: How transforming the economy can tackle inequalities, bring climate justice and build a sustainable future Our vision is that global institutions genuinely represent and are accountable to the interests of everyone, not just the rich and powerful. This means confronting the institutional structures, including the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF), cultural norms and power imbalances that work together to maintain the status quo. We need to look for new expressions of economic life. Measures of economic growth overlook human and environmental wellbeing. It is time re-evaluate. This briefing challenges the World Bank and IMF to be part of this change and to become of a progressive and positive force in an economic future that leaves no one behind and is beneficial for nature and the climate.

Vers la localisation (Pathways to localisation - French)

Cadre visant à une intervention humanitaire menée à l’échelle locale et fondée sur le partenariat. This paper outlines eight priority actions for partnership-based humanitarian action, and five actions for an enabling environment, for locally-led humanitarian action. It is available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page. Note de synthèse  Le Sommet Humanitaire Mondial (WHS) de 2016 a souligné le rôle primordial des acteurs locaux et nationaux dans l’intervention humanitaire. Les trois grandes séries d’engagements qui y ont été prises, à savoir le Programme d’Action pour l’Humanité (2016), le Grand Compromis (2016) et la Charte pour le Changement (2015), ont énoncé les changements ou les transformations nécessaires pour permettre aux acteurs locaux et nationaux de prendre davantage les rênes de l’action humanitaire.   À l’initiative du consortium formé de Christian Aid, CARE, Tearfund, ActionAid, CAFOD et Oxfam, Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships est un programme orienté par les acteurs locaux et nationaux qui siègent dans des comités nationaux de pilotage. La Protection Civile et Opérations d’Aide de la Commission Européenne (ECHO) l’a financé de la fin 2017 à 2019. Ce programme s’inspire de travaux du consortium qui depuis 2012, par le biais de la série de rapports Missed Opportunities, visent à renforcer le rôle moteur des acteurs locaux et nationaux dans l’action humanitaire.   À l’issue de ses recherches, le programme Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships a mis en évidence un modèle fondé sur les pratiques de partenariat qui, selon les acteurs locaux/nationaux, favorisent le plus la localisation4. Pour les besoins de ces travaux, plus de 350 organisations au Myanmar, au Népal, au Nigeria et au Soudan du Sud, dont 85 % sont des organisations locales et nationales, ont été consultées. Elles ont permis aux membres du consortium et à leurs partenaires locaux de repérer, de valider et d’expérimenter un certain nombre de recommandations. Les leçons tirées de la phase d’expérimentation ont été regroupées avec les conclusions des auto-évaluations des capacités de plus d’une centaine d’acteurs locaux et nationaux. Les recherches, les leçons et les conclusions du programme ont façonné l’élaboration de cadres nationaux de localisation. Les acteurs locaux et nationaux, et d’autres intervenants humanitaires, y compris des ONG internationales, des agences des Nations Unies, des donateurs, les sociétés de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge, et les autorités gouvernementales concernées y ont également contribué.   Les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation sont adaptés au contexte très différencié des environnements opérationnels et des crises humanitaires au Myanmar, au Népal, au Nigeria et au Soudan du Sud. Les écarts notables entre les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation sont présentés dans ce document et reflètent la diversité des contextes. Les différences tiennent particulièrement au rôle des autorités gouvernementales dans la localisation. Cependant, ces quatre cadres ont en commun un certain nombre d’actions et de domaines prioritaires, dont plusieurs sont étroitement liés aux engagements, aux cadres et aux indicateurs de localisation existants et cités en référence. Alors que le programme Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships était axé sur l’action humanitaire fondée sur le partenariat, les cadres nationaux de localisation sont allés bien au-delà. Ce rapport présente les principaux domaines traités dans les quatre cadres nationaux de localisation, ainsi que leurs objectifs, leurs actions prioritaires et leurs indicateurs potentiels.  Note d’orientation sur les pratiques de partenariat en vue de la localisation.

Partnership practices for localisation: guidance notes (French)

The top 23 partnership practices for localisation are listed in this guidance note. (French.) These notes are available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page.

Partnership practices for localisation: guidance notes (Spanish)

The top 23 partnership practices for localisation are listed in this guidance note. (Spanish.) These notes are available in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Myanmar and Nepali, from the Accelerating Localisation through Partnerships project page.