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Women on the Front Line

Read our new report which recognises that women are disproportionately affected by climate change.

Syrian Civil Society: A closing door report

Syrian Civil Society: A closing door report

Keeping hope alive: internal investment fund review 2017-18

In 2015, Christian Aid established an internal investment fund to encourage a more specific focus on tackling violence and building peace, in line with the organisation’s strategic objectives.   This has involved:  four annual rounds of funding to date £400,000–£500,000 allocated to the fund each year projects supported in 16 countries, with budgets of £20,000–£100,000 projects funded subject to a competitive selection process. This review is part of a collection of content - 'Keeping hope alive'. Download the review above or view the full report here Context In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the international community for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. This rise in violence has been accompanied by a global undermining of civil society space and an increase in attacks on those at the frontline of protecting human rights and calling for peace locally, with more than 300 murdered in 2017. It is clear that peacebuilding efforts are off course and that development and faith-based actors have a role to play in changing violence to peace.  

In it for the long haul? Lessons on peacebuilding in South Sudan

This report analyses approaches to conflict transformation and peacebuilding in South Sudan. It identifies overarching lessons from outside South Sudan, from the country’s own history, and based on the wisdom of local peacebuilders, long-term practitioners and citizens affected by their work. The reports outlines 10 lessons or principles which provide some guidance to those who wish to understand or support peacebuilding in South Sudan. These are each accompanied by short case studies which explore why these principles can make an important difference. In illuminating the role of ‘local’ or ‘sub-national’ peacebuilding, the report also demonstrates the interlinkages between national and local interests, making the case for why analysis which spans multiple levels is critical to inform understanding, strategies and approaches to building national peace in South Sudan. This report is also accompanied by a policy and practice summary 

Policy and practice summary: Lessons on peacebuilding in South Sudan

This policy and practice summary accompanies a longer report which identifies overarching lessons contributing to the effectiveness of peacebuilding in South Sudan. It aims to provide some guidance for those wishing to understand or support peacebuilding in South Sudan, particularly donor agencies and practitioners within the peacebuilding sector. The summary includes:  Why we should learn from the ‘local’ and engage in multi-level approaches What we found out Conclusion and methodology Read the full report here

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 1)

In this policy briefing, Christian Aid examines the links between climate change and conflict, and begins to elaborate on its argument that the best form of climate security is climate justice.

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 2)

A debilitating drought may bring riots and social unrest in one country, but in a neighbouring country, the same problem may be dealt with by citizen mobilisation towards collective action solutions. To a large extent, governance capacity and community resilience explains the nature and structure of the response. In this report, three case studies – from Angola, Mali, and Honduras – of actual responses to climate change and conflict are presented.

Gender Justice 2017: just and equitable power relations for all

Gender injustice is rooted in unequal power relations and the most pervasive gender inequality is between women and men. Updated 2017 gender strategy. Our vision is to end poverty, and in our corporate strategy Partnership for Change, we identify three main goals which will help us to achieve this: Ensure just power relations Ensure equity and sustainability Ensure resilient and thriving societies Our approach Gender injustice is rooted in unequal power relations and the most pervasive gender inequality is between women and men. Gender injustice violates human rights, constrains choice and agency and negatively impacts upon people’s ability to participate in, contribute to and benefit from development and humanitarian relief. Unless we can help create just and equitable relationships between women and men of all ages and diversities, we will be unable to achieve equitable, sustainable, resilient and thriving societies. Gender justice is, therefore, at the heart of Christian Aid’s work. We also recognise that inequalities intersect and create complex disadvantages that compound gender injustice and poverty. We therefore take an inclusive and intersectional approach that enables us to address how inequalities, such as sexual orientation, ethnicity, age, class, religion, caste and disability, intersect with gender inequality and perpetuate poverty. Through our inclusive approach we can tackle barriers to gender justice that are global, and internal to Christian Aid, in a way that is targeted, sustainable, transformative and ‘leaves no one behind’, as set out in the Sustainable Development Goals. To this end, we continue to focus our work on challenging patriarchy and promoting the empowerment of women and girls, with recognition that men can also be adversely affected by patriarchy and ideals of ‘masculinity’. We also seek to broaden our understanding of gender to include, where relevant, transgender and minority genders, who face increased violence and exclusion.

Christian Aid/PPA performance review 2011-2016

This report is based on Christian Aid’s self-assessment of progress and performance against the PPA log frame during this fourth year of PPA funding. DFID has reviewed Christian Aid’s assessment and provided a DFID specific response within each section of the report. DFID’s responses are based on the narrative provided, known evidence and subsequent discussion with Christian Aid. All recommendations have been agreed by both Christian Aid and DFID.

Leave noone behind

In this report, we seek to illustrate the importance of the ‘leave no one behind’ principle. 

Leave no one behind - from goals to implementation

In this report, we seek to illustrate the importance of the ‘leave no one behind’ principle with case studies from across the world.The 'leave no one behind' concept has emerged as a specific call-to-action within the post-2015 development agenda.