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Budget Credibility Report

This revenue and expenditure credibility analysis is designed to provide Sierra Leoneans, the Government of Sierra Leone (GoSL), development partners and other stakeholders with a full picture of revenue and expenditure in 2017, 2018 and 2019. Various Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment reports (2010, 2014, and 2018) have highlighted the challenges in implementing a credible budget in Sierra Leone. The aim is to highlight performance against the budget at the total and sector level, to draw out some of the reasons behind this, and identify the impacts on public service delivery. The assessment will assist government in addressing some of the challenges that are adversely affecting budget credibility. It will also provide a basis for dialogue between civil society, Parliament, development partners and the GoSL regarding its public financial management reform strategy (2018 – 2021) and delivery of the National Development Plan.

June 2020, Sierra Leone Anti-Corruption Court Monitoring Report

To help strengthen the fight against corruption, an Anti-Corruption Division of the High Court has been established. Pursuant to a Constitutional Instrument dated 4th April 2019, the court is mandated to hear and determine all anti-corruption matters instituted by the Anti-Corruption Commission. The new division, which is expected to be a model court for criminal cases, was set up as part of efforts to address some of the traditional challenges that confront the criminal justice system. These include undue delays in proceedings, limited courtrooms, and integrity deficit among some administrative staff. As part of the efforts of the consortium to promote and strengthen the work of the Anti-Corruption Commission monitors the proceedings from this court and this report is the first from our monitoring of its proceedings. 

Corruption Perception Survey Report, 2019

This report – commissioned by the Centre for Accountability and Rule of Law (with funding from DFID and support from Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) - seeks a bottom-up account from the Sierra Leonean people regarding the status of corruption. It examines their perceptions about the fight against corruption; about the institutions involved; about the delivery of public services, and about their own roles and actions in relation to the fight against corruption. The study was conducted between September and November 2019. Three data streams were utilized: a literature review; a social survey where 2619 persons were interviewed in all 16 districts of the country; followed by in-depth interviews geared towards getting detailed insights from experts and practitioners regarding their observations and reactions to the findings of the social survey 

Cost of Corruption in Sierra Leone Report, 2019

Corruption happens underground and its damage and volume can be difficult to quantify. This report systematically presents data on the quantitative estimate of the cost of corruption that occurred between 2016 - 2018 – the period leading up to the 2018 general elections in Sierra Leone onto the transfer of power to the opposition. The Centre for Accountability and the Rule of Law (CARL), along with its project consortium partners (Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) commissioned this study to generate data which anti-corruption agencies and their partners could utilise to develop more effective tools to respond to and track progress in fighting corruption. Data was collected from ten sectors which form 72.5 percent of the economy. The sectors studied include agriculture, mining, energy, fishery, construction, banking, education, health, transport and communication

SABI Learning Review: Triggering Citizen Action

SABI is a programme operating in all 16 districts of Sierra Leone to increase citizen demands to their governments for the delivery of basic services. This learning review asked the question – has SABI succeeded in supporting community citizen action for effective governance and improved public services? It draws on SABI’s database of 786 community action plans, and interviews and groups discussions with implementing partners, youth accountability volunteers and community members.

Keeping hope alive: Christian Aid's work on peace - Impact study 2019

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This Impact Study, and accompanying case studies, share some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Key facts In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the Sustainable Development Goals – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. (OECD). Violent conflict has spiked since 2010, with two billion people now living in countries where development outcomes are affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (World Bank, 2018). Much of this violence is due to recurring violence and protracted conflicts. It is estimated that 135 different countries have experienced conflict recurrence – a pattern that is deepening. We stand in solidarity with our local partners – households, community organisations and local leadership who live through conflict and violence first hand. We want governments, faith institutions and communities to want and work for peace in their societies and to keep hope alive. Peace is not something fluffy and aspirational. Peacebuilding can and does work.

Keeping hope alive: Colombia case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in Colombia, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Download the case study above or view the full report here

Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management

Governance, gender, peace building and human rights Tackling the problems of poverty, vulnerability and exclusion that persist in parts of the world that continue to be affected by violence or political insecurity is difficult for several reasons. For one, because of the complexity of the prevailing social, economic and political systems, solutions to chronic problems are far from obvious. One response to this aspect of the challenge is adaptive programme design and management. This paper, 'Learning to make a difference: Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management in governance, gender, peace building and human rights', is the product of a multi-year collaboration between ODI and the core team of Christian Aid Ireland to assess the relevance of adaptive or trial-and-error approaches to the field of governance, peace building and human rights. It explains the basis on which Christian Aid Ireland’s current five-year programme funded by Irish Aid has become committed to an adaptive approach. It then describes and seeks to draw lessons from the programme’s first year of experience, considering the possible implications for implementation over the coming years.

Sierra Leone: women and politics - qualitative participatory research

A participatory governance assessment in Sierra Leone, focused on Christian Aid’s partner SEND and its women in governance project in Kailahun district.

LPRR: action learning research

In order for productive learning to occur within the context of this project, monitoring practices must be robust and go beyond collecting data against indicators. This is especially important within a resilience context, as the pre-emptive baseline measurement that is usually used for measuring progress/success is not desirable here. Instead, an ‘outcome harvesting’ approach is more practical, as it does not measure progress towards predetermined outcomes or objectives, but rather collects evidence of what has been achieved, and works backward to determine whether and how the project or intervention contributed to the change. Within the LPRR project there is a need for rigorous evaluation, which balances accountability and learning. Given the ever-evolving evidence base of ‘what works under what conditions’ coupled with the need to demonstrate quality, impactful programming in both upwards and downwards accountability, these types of robust evaluations are essential. In order to ensure learning and accountability are achieved through evaluations, they must be well-planned and budgeted for. This is where the role of the learning strand comes in; by recognising that learning is essential at the outset, it enables it to be included within the design of the project.

Christian Aid en América Latina y el Caribe estrategia (Spanish)

Hemos trabajado en América Latina y el Caribe por más de 30 años, apoyando a nuestras contrapartes para enfrentar la injusticia, las violaciones a los derechos humanos y la desigualdad.