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Health Facility Assessment Report

How prepared is our healthcare system for the COVID-19 pandemic? Existing health care delivery system both in the public and private sectors were assessed through a survey labelled Health Facilities Assessment (HFA). This survey was conducted by Christian Aid partners and led by Christian Aid Nigeria in three states across 12 Local Government Areas (LGAs). The objective of the survey was to assess the existing health services profile, physical infrastructure, equipment/supplies, human resources, auxiliary services and quality of health services been rendered to the communities. This is a five-month project funded by DFID and being implemented by Christian Aid Nigeria and Afghanistan through local partners. In Nigeria the intervention is implemented by a local consortium led by Christian Aid Nigeria and four local partners: Mercy Vincent Foundation (MVF) and Ekklisiyar Yan’Uwa ‘a Nigeria (Church of the Brethren in Nigeria) leading project activities in Borno state, Legal Awareness for Nigerian Women (LANW) is leading activities in Kaduna state while Community Links and Human Empowerment Initiative (CLHEI) is responsible for Benue state.

Another chance to live and thrive

Amina Sani lost everything when Boko Haram attacked her village in 2015. Like many other people living in Gora, Shani Borno State Nigeria, Amina and her family returned to their village with all means of livelihood gone, everything destroyed. As a mother of 7, making a living as a potter proved hard. So, when Amina was enlisted to be part of a saving and loans scheme, and trained in business skills, supported by Christian Aid and WFP, she was extremely grateful. ‘May Christian Aid live long’. Amina prays. To support her children, Amina has remained extremely committed to the saving and loans scheme. With an initial seed fund of N12,000, Amina borrowed a further N5,000 from friends, just enough to start a grain business. Within weeks of buying and selling grain, Amina paid back her loan and invested in buying mobile network cards, which she now sells as well as grain. Now, when Amina sells her grain, she makes N1,000 per bag. The mobile network cards are also profitable, and she makes 10% profit on her investments in this area of her business. ‘Being a member of Christian Aid’s saving and loans scheme was a turning point in my life’, Amina says. She explains that making clay and pottery was previously not profitable, and that her new business has made life much easier for her and for her family. It has given her another chance to live and thrive. ‘My children now eat well’ Amina explains, and she is happy that her last child is active and happy. Amina is one of many women from Gora Village, Shani Borno State who have turned their lives around through the support of this project.

Giving Hope to People in Conflict

Christian Aid Blanket Supplementary Feeding Program (BSFP) project provided immediate life-saving food and nutrition assistance to breast-feeding and children under the age of five years.

Meet Christian Aid Nigeria's Senior Management Team

At Christian Aid Nigeria Country programme, our vision is for a just, equitable and peaceful Nigerian society, where poverty has been eradicated and every person is empowered to live life in all its fullness. We work to improve the health of poor and marginalised people; raise community voices to demand accountability through advocacy and promoting engagement between people and government; improve gender equity and the participation of women and girls in development initiatives, and respond to humanitarian emergency to alleviate the suffering of people affected by conflict and disaster. Christian Aid’s programmes are managed by a team of highly skilled development professionals who bring years of experience in development work to implement inclusive programmes in all of the organisation’s programme themes. Find out more about our work in Nigeria here

A FAIR deal for IDPs 4: Agenda 2030

Agenda 2030 offers an unrivalled chance to ensure that response and aid delivers for IDPs. What does it need to succeed?

A FAIR deal for IDPs 3: Funding

How can we address the root causes of - and put an end to - long-term displacement?

A FAIR deal for IDPs 2: Respect the laws protecting uprooted people

How can the laws to protect internally displaced people (IDPs) be respected?

A FAIR deal for IDPs 1: Leave no one behind

How can we make sure that the rights and needs of internally displaced persons (IDPs) are no longer overlooked?

Resilience case studies

The following nine case studies illustrate how we interpret resilience – as a means of putting communities and individuals at the centre of their own development.

Tackling violence, building peace: global strategy 2016

Violence and conflict affects almost one fifth of the world’s population or 1.5 billion people. The daily fear, uncertainty and suffering borne by people living through violent conflicts in countries such as Syria, Iraq and South Sudan is immeasurable and unimaginable. The war in Syria, has contributed to the highest number of displaced people since World War II; nearly five million having fled its bombs and bullets. Meanwhile, the catastrophe continues for people trapped in besieged villages across Syria and Iraq. Other countries like Colombia are striving to end protracted conflicts and push peace over the line. Today, one in every 122 people is now a refugee, internally displaced or seeking asylum, and the cost of world military spending is said to be nearly 250 times more than is spent on peace building. Christian Aid has adopted ‘Tackling Violence, Building Peace,’ as a strategic priority to address these critical trends and because we know that human development cannot be achieved without tackling violence. Seventy years after Christian Aid’s establishment, the root causes and levels of violence in poor communities where we work persists, often at higher levels and irrespective of whether those communities are ‘at war’ or not. Most of the world’s poorest people live outside of any form of protection and remain vulnerable to war and conflict, violent criminal organisations, gender-based violence, police abuse, forced labour and violent theft of land and other assets on a daily basis. People who do not have a safe place to call home, reliable access to food and an income because of violence, cannot plan for the future. Communities living through daily violence cannot thrive. And children who are forced to leave school because of violence are denied a chance at their hopes and dreams. Women and girls are also increasingly subject to physical and sexual violence, a harrowing result of gender inequality. Conflict is complex and even when peace comes, it does not always signal an end to violence. It can mark a shift from militarised conflict to widespread social conflict. For example, in Central America more people die violently today due to crime than during the civil wars of Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua combined. Our new strategy underpins our commitment to tackle violence and to promote just and lasting peace and security where we work. The strategy is deeply informed by our work in countries across the globe and reflects the aspirations and vision of our local partners. Peace is both an end in itself and a prerequisite for development. ‘Tackling Violence, Building Peace’ is our pledge to work tirelessly and collectively towards a safer future that secures justice and human rights for all.

Land Matters: Programme toolkit

This toolkit is to help Christian Aid programmes develop and deepen our strategies for working on land.

Land Matters: Dispossession and Resistance

This report seeks to contribute to greater understanding of how people respond to and resist land dispossession.

Large-Scale Land Acquisitions

A report examining the dramatic increase in demand for large-scale land acquisitions in developing countries from investors.