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Tackling Malnutrition in South Sudan

Read our latest report from our UK Aid Match programme in South Sudan, tackling malnutrition for 28,000 women and children in Aweil North and Jur River.

Budget Credibility Report

This revenue and expenditure credibility analysis is designed to provide Sierra Leoneans, the Government of Sierra Leone (GoSL), development partners and other stakeholders with a full picture of revenue and expenditure in 2017, 2018 and 2019. Various Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA) assessment reports (2010, 2014, and 2018) have highlighted the challenges in implementing a credible budget in Sierra Leone. The aim is to highlight performance against the budget at the total and sector level, to draw out some of the reasons behind this, and identify the impacts on public service delivery. The assessment will assist government in addressing some of the challenges that are adversely affecting budget credibility. It will also provide a basis for dialogue between civil society, Parliament, development partners and the GoSL regarding its public financial management reform strategy (2018 – 2021) and delivery of the National Development Plan.

June 2020, Sierra Leone Anti-Corruption Court Monitoring Report

To help strengthen the fight against corruption, an Anti-Corruption Division of the High Court has been established. Pursuant to a Constitutional Instrument dated 4th April 2019, the court is mandated to hear and determine all anti-corruption matters instituted by the Anti-Corruption Commission. The new division, which is expected to be a model court for criminal cases, was set up as part of efforts to address some of the traditional challenges that confront the criminal justice system. These include undue delays in proceedings, limited courtrooms, and integrity deficit among some administrative staff. As part of the efforts of the consortium to promote and strengthen the work of the Anti-Corruption Commission monitors the proceedings from this court and this report is the first from our monitoring of its proceedings. 

Corruption Perception Survey Report, 2019

This report – commissioned by the Centre for Accountability and Rule of Law (with funding from DFID and support from Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) - seeks a bottom-up account from the Sierra Leonean people regarding the status of corruption. It examines their perceptions about the fight against corruption; about the institutions involved; about the delivery of public services, and about their own roles and actions in relation to the fight against corruption. The study was conducted between September and November 2019. Three data streams were utilized: a literature review; a social survey where 2619 persons were interviewed in all 16 districts of the country; followed by in-depth interviews geared towards getting detailed insights from experts and practitioners regarding their observations and reactions to the findings of the social survey 

Cost of Corruption in Sierra Leone Report, 2019

Corruption happens underground and its damage and volume can be difficult to quantify. This report systematically presents data on the quantitative estimate of the cost of corruption that occurred between 2016 - 2018 – the period leading up to the 2018 general elections in Sierra Leone onto the transfer of power to the opposition. The Centre for Accountability and the Rule of Law (CARL), along with its project consortium partners (Christian Aid, Restless Development and Budget Advocacy Network) commissioned this study to generate data which anti-corruption agencies and their partners could utilise to develop more effective tools to respond to and track progress in fighting corruption. Data was collected from ten sectors which form 72.5 percent of the economy. The sectors studied include agriculture, mining, energy, fishery, construction, banking, education, health, transport and communication

Health Facility Assessment Report

How prepared is our healthcare system for the COVID-19 pandemic? Existing health care delivery system both in the public and private sectors were assessed through a survey labelled Health Facilities Assessment (HFA). This survey was conducted by Christian Aid partners and led by Christian Aid Nigeria in three states across 12 Local Government Areas (LGAs). The objective of the survey was to assess the existing health services profile, physical infrastructure, equipment/supplies, human resources, auxiliary services and quality of health services been rendered to the communities. This is a five-month project funded by DFID and being implemented by Christian Aid Nigeria and Afghanistan through local partners. In Nigeria the intervention is implemented by a local consortium led by Christian Aid Nigeria and four local partners: Mercy Vincent Foundation (MVF) and Ekklisiyar Yan’Uwa ‘a Nigeria (Church of the Brethren in Nigeria) leading project activities in Borno state, Legal Awareness for Nigerian Women (LANW) is leading activities in Kaduna state while Community Links and Human Empowerment Initiative (CLHEI) is responsible for Benue state.

Building Trusted Partnerships for Healthy and Resilient Communities

The health legacy project is implemented in five African countries; Burundi, Sierra Leone and South Sudan, Nigeria and Kenya. By August 2019 the project had completed two years of implementation. The project addresses the issue of gender justice, promotes equitable social norms and institutions, and improves accountability by building the agency of citizens. Evidence has shown the project to have positive impacts on lives of our beneficiaries and their communities. This includes improved resilience of families and communities, especially those in fragile and resource-challenged settings. They are better prepared in terms of ability to anticipate, identify, and respond to health risks.

Report: How credible is the Government budget?

This budget credibility report examines the extent, nature, causes and consequences of deviations from approved budgets and policies from 2017 to 2019.  

E4E Nigeria project: Benue State Contingency Plan 2019-2020

Coordinating Humanitarian and Emergency Response The Benue State contingency plan was developed in partnership with the state government through its Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) and the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA). It identifies and defines the conditions necessary for emergency actions by SEMA as the coordinating agency in emergencies at the state and all relevant stakeholders. This one-year plan has been developed to provide a basis for coordination of humanitarian response by the Benue State Government of Nigeria in the event of a major/catastrophic disaster within the period of 2019 and 2020. The plan will be delivered through the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA). This document adopts the multi-risk approach and identifies flood, epidemic, drought, crises and terrorism as probable disasters that can cause high level impact and displacement of persons.  

E4E Nigeria project: Kaduna State Contingency Plan 2019-2020

Coordinating Humanitarian and Emergency Response This contingency plan was compiled collaboratively by stakeholders in emergency and humanitarian response in Kaduna State. The intention for this document is to have clearly outlined responsibilities and roles in case of an emergency and to initiate emergency measures and procedures to reduce the risk of loss of life and property, damage resulting from an emergency. This Contingency plan has been developed to provide a basis for coordination of humanitarian response in the event of a major/catastrophic disaster for the initial 10 days by the state government through the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) for 2019-2020. This document adopts the multi-risk approach and identified flood, fire outbreak, epidemic, communal clashes, and terrorism as probable disasters that can cause high level impact and displacement of persons. A population of 20,000 was used as the benchmark for planning assumptions. The geographical area covered the state based on identified hazards. Meteorological predictions, monitoring of dams as well as socio and ethno-religious crises mentioned by relevant agencies were used as the basis for early warnings and triggers for the probability of occurrence of the identified disasters.

E4E Nigeria project: Plateau State Contingency Plan 2019-20

Coordinating Humanitarian and Emergency Response Appreciation goes to the collaborators who developed the Plateau State Contingency Plan. This plan is a preparedness document which sets out an organised, planned, and coordinated course of action to be followed to minimise hazards. This Contingency Plan has been developed to provide a basis for coordination of humanitarian response in the event of a major/catastrophic disaster for the initial 10 days by the State Government through the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) for 2019-2020. This document adopts the Multi-Risk Approach, and identified flood, fire outbreak, epidemic, communal clashes, and terrorism as probable disasters that can cause high level impact and displacement of persons. A population of 20,000 was used as the benchmark for planning assumptions. The geographical area covered the state based on identified hazards. Meteorological predictions, monitoring of dams as well as socio and ethno-religious crises mentioned by relevant agencies were used as the basis for Early Warnings and triggers for the probability of occurrence of the identified disasters.

The new global debt crisis

Spiralling debt repayments divert precious resources from governments that can ill afford to spare them. Without spending money on basic services like clean water, sanitation and health, there is little hope of poor countries meeting the development need, and human rights, of their citizens.  This report explores the current debt crisis, its risks, and ways to tackle it. Produced as part of the Citizens for Financial Justice project

Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management

Governance, gender, peace building and human rights Tackling the problems of poverty, vulnerability and exclusion that persist in parts of the world that continue to be affected by violence or political insecurity is difficult for several reasons. For one, because of the complexity of the prevailing social, economic and political systems, solutions to chronic problems are far from obvious. One response to this aspect of the challenge is adaptive programme design and management. This paper, 'Learning to make a difference: Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management in governance, gender, peace building and human rights', is the product of a multi-year collaboration between ODI and the core team of Christian Aid Ireland to assess the relevance of adaptive or trial-and-error approaches to the field of governance, peace building and human rights. It explains the basis on which Christian Aid Ireland’s current five-year programme funded by Irish Aid has become committed to an adaptive approach. It then describes and seeks to draw lessons from the programme’s first year of experience, considering the possible implications for implementation over the coming years.

Connecting the Voices of People across Kaduna and Southeast State

Connecting the Voices of people across Kaduna and Southeast State is an endline evaluation report for the Voice to the People (V2P) project which was implemented in Kaduna state and all the 5 states in southeast Nigeria. This document presents key findings of the successes and challenges form V2P and makes tangible recommendations for the implementation of similar governance programmes and interventions from the lessons learnt. The study was carried out in four of the project states (Anambra, Ebonyi, Imo and Kaduna States) covering 16 local government areas (LGAs) and 41 communities involving different categories - community leader, member of a community group, community facilitator and community member without a community function (i.e. an ordinary community member).

In it for the long haul? Lessons on peacebuilding in South Sudan

This report analyses approaches to conflict transformation and peacebuilding in South Sudan. It identifies overarching lessons from outside South Sudan, from the country’s own history, and based on the wisdom of local peacebuilders, long-term practitioners and citizens affected by their work. The reports outlines 10 lessons or principles which provide some guidance to those who wish to understand or support peacebuilding in South Sudan. These are each accompanied by short case studies which explore why these principles can make an important difference. In illuminating the role of ‘local’ or ‘sub-national’ peacebuilding, the report also demonstrates the interlinkages between national and local interests, making the case for why analysis which spans multiple levels is critical to inform understanding, strategies and approaches to building national peace in South Sudan. This report is also accompanied by a policy and practice summary