Skip to main content

We found 93

Showing 1 - 18

Ghana learning review

A decade of innovation in tax justice and inclusive markets programming

Guidance on whistleblowing

It is the duty of every employee to speak up about genuine concerns in relation to criminal activity, breach of legal obligation (including negligence, breach of contract, breach of administrative law, miscarriage of justice, danger to health and safety or environment) and the cover up of any of these in the workplace. Christian Aid is committed to ensuring that any employee's concerns of this nature will be taken seriously and investigated, and as part of this commitment has developed this guidance note on whistleblowing.

Safeguarding policy

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of

A Rights-Based Economy Report

The COVID-19 pandemic has shone a spotlight on the fundamental injustice at the core of our current economic model, which results in scarcity for the many, and unimaginable wealth for the few. The economic fallout from the pandemic and the inadequacy of governments’ responses to it are prompting more and more people to question the morality of an economic system which for decades has placed the market at the centre of all human interactions, measuring progress and development solely in terms of economic growth. In this publication, the Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR) and Christian Aid – two international organisations working for human rights and economic justice – ask: what would it would look like if we had an economy based on human rights?

Cancel the Debt supporter toolkit

Explore how you can take part in this campaign to cancel the debt of poor countries

How Christian Aid pays its staff

The effective stewardship of resources is core to the vision and values that underpin Christian Aid’s work in seeking to bring about a fairer, more equitable world. We recognise the important responsibility we have to the poor communities we work with, our donors, supporters and the general public, to ensure we are open and transparent on how we use the funds that are so generously donated for the work we undertake.  We are committed to ensuring value for money in everything we do and this includes how we remunerate our staff. We operate a policy that is fair, equitable and consistent to attract, motivate and retain capable staff that have the skills and experience we require to implement the work we do.  What are our pay principles? Our salaries are set within in a policy that reflects the values and ethos of the organisation, benchmarking against other comparable charities and church organisations at a level that is just below or at the median of these comparators. The basic principle for determining salaries is that employees carrying out the same or similar jobs in the same location are paid the same or similar salary. Salaries differ where jobs are of a different size, complexity, responsibility and accountability. Tackling global poverty and social injustice is highly complex and we value the contribution that each individual employee makes to our organisation’s success. Our approach to reward is guided by the following principles which are applied equally to all our staff wherever they are located and whatever their position:  We will provide a total reward package which recognises contribution to the achievement of our aims. Our reward offering will be competitive in the marketplace from which we draw the people we need.  The reward decisions we make will be consistent and based on objective assessment of our organisational needs.  Wherever we can we will offer flexibility and choice so that individuals can achieve what is most relevant and has most value to them.  We will make arrangements which comply fully with relevant legislation wherever we are operating. How is pay governed? The implementation of our remuneration policy, which is set by the Board, is overseen by the Remuneration Committee. This committee has delegated authority to provide governance oversight and input on all matters concerning the principles and policies governing the pay and benefits of Christian Aid staff. Its responsibilities include: To consider any suggested changes to those principles and policies and make recommendations to the Board. To make recommendations to the Board for any necessary adjustments, consistent with affordability within agreed budget parameters. To collect and consider evidence of movements in the external pay market as it affects Christian Aid, and to make recommendations to the Board for any necessary adjustments required to ensure Christian Aid is able to recruit and retain appropriately skilled staff to implement its strategy effectively. To make recommendations from time to time to the Board on the broad policy framework and overall costs of the remuneration of the Chief Executive and the Directors and to determine the salary of the Chief Executive. Our lower salary band for all employed staff in the UK and Ireland is above the Living Wage, as is the salary of all third party contracted cleaning staff employed in our UK and Ireland regional and national offices. Christian is an accredited “Living Wage Employer”. For salaries of staff based in the UK and Ireland, the Board has adopted the “Hutton Fair Pay Review” recommendation which limits the differential of pay between the highest paid person and others, using a ratio based on the median salary. The Board has set this ratio at 4:1 on UK salaries. The salaries for our internationally based staff are set within their local employment market, against a benchmark of other comparable organisations, consistent with our overall remuneration policy. Further information on what we currently spend on salaries, including the salary of the Chief Executive, can be found in our 2016/17 Annual Report. How much is Christian Aid’s Chief Executive paid? Christian Aid’s Chief Executive, Amanda Khozi Mukwashi, earned £132,000 last year. We recognise that this is a large sum of money. Christian Aid makes every effort to avoid paying higher salaries than are necessary. We pay our staff salaries the same as, or below, the median of other church-based and/or international development agencies. A recent survey of UK charities showed that we pay significantly below the average pay of £167,000 for CEO’s of the top 100 charities, in terms of income, in the country. The Chief Executive role carries an immense amount of responsibility. This includes the stewardship, governance and oversight of how we spend our £106m annual income, the welfare of up to 900 staff and the projects we support to help lift millions of people out of poverty. Within Christian Aid we are committed to the idea that transparency empowers – that’s why we’re already one of the most transparent organisations in the sector. We’ve always been clear on who earns what and we’re accredited with the highest international standards of transparency. How do we manage annual pay reviews? Each year, Christian Aid conducts an annual pay review of staff salaries. In the UK and Ireland we calculate inflation rates using the average of Average Weekly Earnings Index (AWE) and the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Any inflationary award or other necessary adjustments made on salaries are subject to affordability. For our internationally based staff we use country data from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for calculating cost of living increases for country offices. Adjustments are implemented on April 1. Contact us

Use and abuse of tax breaks: how tax incentives become harmful

Taxation is essential to raise sufficient, equitable and accountable financing for development. Only through taxation can governments fund public spending on the essential services at the quality and scale necessary to realise the rights of all citizens. Yet many Southern governments decide not to tax certain corporations and companies in the hope that this will attract cross-border investment. Despite mounting evidence that the practice of offering tax incentives is both largely ineffective and detrimental to development, it is widespread. This report explains how tax incentives can become harmful, and discusses what can be done to stop their abuse.

Trapped in illicit finance

The world faces some of the most serious economic, environmental, social and political challenges it ever has. Across the world, citizens are calling for governments to implement policies to address these issues. Again, and again, governments tell them the same thing: “we don’t have the money”. At the same time, it’s a fact that governments worldwide tolerate widespread tax evasion and avoidance – and that malevolent actors routinely steal from government funds. Indeed, it is estimated that $416bn is lost every year to illicit financial flows (IFFs) – illegal or harmful movements of money or capital from one country to another. In this report, Christian Aid and our partners propose a simple solution for plugging some of this funding gap: we must stop tolerating the abusive, unethical and immoral IFFs that rob the poor to enrich the wealthy.

Hunger Strike: The climate and food vulnerability index

The Climate and Food Vulnerability Index shows how the countries most impacted by food insecurity are the least responsible for the climate change which drives it.   The top 10 most insecure countries combined generate just 0.08% of global CO2 emissions. Burundi is both the most food insecure country in the world and has the smallest carbon footprint per person.

Generando Empresas y Derechos Humanos

Las prácticas corporativas irresponsables representan graves riesgos para los derechos humanos. A menudo, tienen impactos que afectan a las personas de manera diferente debido a su género, haciendo que las desigualdades que ya experimentan sean aún mayores. En este informe, identificamos estudios de casos, destacamos temas clave sobre el impacto de género de las prácticas corporativas y exploramos su relación con el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos y los marcos relacionados. Creemos que las empresas, en particular las empresas transnacionales, deben hacer valer los derechos humanos y deben ser responsabilizadas por el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos. También creemos que el Marco de Negocios y Derechos Humanos de la ONU, sus mecanismos de implementación, y los estados y entidades comerciales a los que se aplica, deben responder mejor a los impactos negativos de las empresas en los derechos de las mujeres y los géneros marginados.

Corporate approaches to addressing modern day slavery

Download this report providing a snapshot of corporate approaches to modern day slavery based on research of 21 leading brands and retailers. From the Ethical Trading Initiative and The Ashridge Centre for Business and Sustainability at Hult International Business School.

Tackling modern day slavery - the John Lewis Partnership

Download this report from the John Lewis Partnership outlining their business and human rights strategy in response to the Modern Slavery Act. From the Salt Business Network. 

Engendering Business and Human Rights

Irresponsible corporate practices pose serious human rights risks. Often, they have impacts which affect people differently because of their gender, making the inequalities that they already experience even greater. In this report, we identify case studies, highlight key issues on the gendered impact of corporate practices, and explore their relationship with international human rights law and related frameworks. We believe that businesses, in particular transnational corporations, must bring human rights to bear and must be held to account under international human rights law. We also believe that the UN Business and Human Rights Framework, its implementation mechanisms, and the states and business entities to which it applies, must respond better to the negative impacts of business on the rights of women and marginalised genders.

World Bank & IMF briefings

Read our briefing papers ahead of the World Bank Group's 2019 Spring Meetings The Big Shift Needed for Climate Justice A Just Global Economy Leave No One Behind? From Violence to Peace

Safeguarding policy, Portuguese (PDF)

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of the children and adults. The guiding principle of our Safeguarding Policy, here translated into Portuguese, is that Christian Aid believes that it is always unacceptable for children, young people, or adults to experience any kind of abuse.

Safeguarding policy, French (PDF)

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of the children and adults. The guiding principle of our Safeguarding Policy, here translated into French, is that Christian Aid believes that it is always unacceptable for children, young people, or adults to experience any kind of abuse.

Safeguarding policy, Spanish (PDF)

Christian Aid is committed to protecting the dignity and rights of every person, and works with those that are committed to supporting poor and marginalised communities to eradicate poverty and promote basic rights and justice. This includes the rights of the children and adults. The guiding principle of our Safeguarding Policy, here translated into Spanish, is that Christian Aid believes that it is always unacceptable for children, young people, or adults to experience any kind of abuse.