Skip to main content

We found 52

Showing 1 - 18

Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part One - Guide

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the ECID programme.

Gender, Inclusion, Power & Politics (GIPP) Toolkit - Part Two - Toolkit

GIPP is an analysis tool developed by Christian Aid and Social Development Direct, through the Evidence and Collaboration for Inclusive Development (ECID) programme, funded by UK Aid.

Inclusive Peacebuilding - English

Online Training of Trainers for Gender Sensitive Peacebuilding

Inclusive Peacebuilding - Burmese

Online Training of Trainers for Gender Sensitive Peacebuilding

Simmons and Simmons

Simmons and Simmons partnering for a fairer and more just world

Evidence Report: Project Maria Caicedo

Development of inclusive markets to build peace in Colombia. The case of the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tulua.

Informe de evidencia: Proyecto María Caicedo

Desarrollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia. El caso de las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá

Desarollo de mercados inclusivos para construir paz en Colombia

Colombia es el mayor productor de hoja de coca del mundo. Desde el 2000, Estados Unidos ha asignado 10.000 millones de dólares en un intento por detener su producción, y se han fumigado más de 1,6 millones de hectáreas en un intento por erradicar las plantaciones de coca. Sin embargo, la superficie cultivada en el país ha aumentado en un promedio de 45% por año - con 177.000 hectáreas en 2017 que se utilizan para el cultivo de coca. Como es evidente, la lucha contra las drogas ha fracasado. Trabajando en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina del Valle del Río Cimitarra, Catatumbo y Tuluá, el Proyecto María Caicedo trabaja para la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz. El proyecto se diseñó para captar la voz de los que quedaron atrás (a través de los años de conflicto en Colombia, y por los esfuerzos subsiguientes para traer la paz) y se involucraron en las economías ilegales en la Colombia rural. Esta investigación proporcionó elementos clave para contribuir a la construcción de paz en Colombia a través de la transformación de las economías de guerra en economías de paz en las Zonas de Reserva Campesina (ZRC). Adoptamos un enfoque sistémico, que involucra los sistemas políticos y económicos a nivel local y nacional, buscando dar a las personas más marginadas una voz y, en última instancia, poder para salir de la pobreza. Estos informes, tanto en inglés como en español, muestran los resultados de nuestra investigación y cómo Colombia puede avanzar hacia economías de paz. Este reporte muestra un resumen de los resultados del Proyecto. Para leer el reporte completo, haga clic aquí. 

Development of Inclusive Markets to Build Peace in Colombia

Colombia is the largest producer of coca leaf in the world. Since 2000, United States has allocated USD 10 billion in an attempt to stop its production, with more than 1.6 million hectares being sprayed in an attempt to eradicate coca plantations. But the cultivated area in the country has increased by an average of 45% per year – with 177,000 hectares in 2017 being used for growing coca. As is evident, the fight against drugs has failed. Working in the Peasant Reserve Zones of the Cimitarra River Valley, Catatumbo and Tuluá, Project Maria Caicedo works towards the transformation of war economies into peace economies. The project was designed to capture the voice of those left behind (through the years of conflict in Colombia, and by the subsequent efforts to bring peace) and involved in illegal economies in the rural Colombia. This research provided key building blocks in the foundation of peace in Colombia through the transformation of war economies to peace economies in Peasant Reserve Areas (ZRC, by its acronym in Spanish). We  took a systemic approach, which involved the political and economic systems at the local and national levels, seeking to give the most marginalised people a voice and ultimately power to emerge from poverty. This report gives a summary of the project's findings. For the full report, click here.

Understanding change and peacebuilding in a Colombian human rights NGO

REL Practice Paper 2 This paper looks at the Theory of Change of the Inter-Church Justice and Peace Commission (CIJP), a human rights NGO and long-term partner of Christian Aid Colombia. It offers a window into understanding how an organisation set up to respond to a violent conflict perceives change in its own role as the conflict itself changes.  The paper traces shifts in CIJP’s relationship with the state, with communities, with its allies in civil society and with the private sector, and the strategies and interventions it now uses to work towards mobilised communities, an operational rule of law, and a democracy based on justice and peace. As well as documenting its current ToC, the paper proposes to Christian Aid and CIJP an approach that could be used to track future shifts to build up a detailed, long-term picture of the strategic evolution of a CSO in a shifting political context.   Author: Rosemary McGee

Balancing research and practice in an international NGO

REL Practice Paper 1 Ten Years of Change is a collaborative, long-term practitioner research initiative designed to take place in three countries – Colombia, Kenya and the UK. It is implemented by the Research, Evidence and Learning team at Christian Aid. The research began with the overarching question how are community members and supporters being influenced by, and influencing, processes of social change? Each country team adapted the question to make it relevant to their socio-political context, and designed research at several different levels, from local to national. This paper tells the story of the first three years of Ten Years of Change. It narrates our ideas and ambitions and how we clarified them; how we identified where, by whom and how the study would be implemented; and how we worked with colleagues in other countries to begin to translate our idea into practice. It then discusses the forces that shaped the parallel but distinct evolution of each of the three streams of the study, before reflecting on the challenges of trade-offs and power. It concludes by returning to some of our assumptions about practitioner research, reflecting on how they played out in practice, finally turning to considerations for the next stage of the study.  

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Myanmar)

This Myanmar-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Illicit drugs and tough trade-offs in war-to-peace transitions

Millions of marginalised people rely on illicit drug economies - often deeply intertwined with armed conflicts - for their survival. But Agenda 2030, particularly Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16, makes no mention of illicit drug economies. It is clear that the war on drugs has not worked, and it is increasingly recognised that a new, development-based approach to tackling illicit economies is needed. But at present, the evidence base to inform such policies is weak. This report presents evidence on why illicit drugs are a development issue and why they matter for peacebuilding, before discussing the problem with current approaches, and the implications for drugs, peacebuilding and development policy. Report authors: Ross Eventon and Eric Gutierrez

Socialise to Immunise: boosting vaccination uptake through Facebook

In Myanmar's Kachin state only 54-60% of children under 2 years have received all basic vaccinations. However, the rates for individual vaccination of children is much higher, such as 91.2% for the BCG vaccine.[i] We know that vaccine hesitancy is a complex issue. The WHO identifies three main driving factors; confidence, complacency and convenience. Conventional methods to increase basic child vaccination rates, mostly target caregivers directly to increase people’s knowledge and thus change attitudes and behaviour. Our own research shows that social networks have a strong influence on immunisation behaviour.[ii] An important factor in this respect is the ‘social bandwagon effect’, meaning that caregivers do what everyone does, adhere to the social-cultural norm regarding vaccination, which can be to either follow or not follow the vaccination schedules. The slightest increase in uptake by influential individuals in a group leads to positive spillover in the wider community.[iii] Our Socialise to Immunise project will be piloting and testing an unconventional approach, using Facebook. This interactive approach, based on the premise that the social norm of vaccination behaviour is strongly influenced by peer pressure (social bandwagon), will involve and connect different stakeholders in the vaccination-demand process: caregivers, household decision-makers, community immunisation champions, community members, health care providers. This approach is innovative as it will trial a digital social network which simultaneously addresses the three driving factors as identified by WHO. This update shows how the first stages of the project are progressing and some learnings we are taking forward. [ii] Shi et al., Voluntary vaccination through self organizing behaviors on locally mixed social networks, Scientific Reports 7, 2017 (2665) [iii] Buttenheim AM, Asch DA. Behavioral economics: the key to closing the gap for MDGs 4 and 5? Maternal and child health journal 2013; 17 (4): 581-5 [i] Myanmar Demographic and Health Survey, 2015-2016

Socialize to Immunize project phase 1 two pager

Socialize to Immunize phase 1 two pager

DEC Rohingya Crisis Appeal presentation

DEC Rohingya Crisis Appeal presentation

Rising water and damaged livelihoods in Myanmar

Rising water and damaged livelihoods in Myanmar