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Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Nepali)

This Nepali-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Baseline Survey of Early Warning and Early Response Systems

This report is a baseline survey on the early warning and early response systems in Benue, Kaduna and Plateau States. It explains the capacity and resources available and how the project can support and strengthen the different state structures to be better responsive to any disaster especially flooding.

Christian Aid Nigeria Annual Report 2018

The very latest updates and information from our country programme in Nigeria

E4E Nigeria project: Benue State Contingency Plan 2019-2020

Coordinating Humanitarian and Emergency Response The Benue State contingency plan was developed in partnership with the state government through its Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) and the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA). It identifies and defines the conditions necessary for emergency actions by SEMA as the coordinating agency in emergencies at the state and all relevant stakeholders. This one-year plan has been developed to provide a basis for coordination of humanitarian response by the Benue State Government of Nigeria in the event of a major/catastrophic disaster within the period of 2019 and 2020. The plan will be delivered through the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA). This document adopts the multi-risk approach and identifies flood, epidemic, drought, crises and terrorism as probable disasters that can cause high level impact and displacement of persons.  

E4E Nigeria project: Kaduna State Contingency Plan 2019-2020

Coordinating Humanitarian and Emergency Response This contingency plan was compiled collaboratively by stakeholders in emergency and humanitarian response in Kaduna State. The intention for this document is to have clearly outlined responsibilities and roles in case of an emergency and to initiate emergency measures and procedures to reduce the risk of loss of life and property, damage resulting from an emergency. This Contingency plan has been developed to provide a basis for coordination of humanitarian response in the event of a major/catastrophic disaster for the initial 10 days by the state government through the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) for 2019-2020. This document adopts the multi-risk approach and identified flood, fire outbreak, epidemic, communal clashes, and terrorism as probable disasters that can cause high level impact and displacement of persons. A population of 20,000 was used as the benchmark for planning assumptions. The geographical area covered the state based on identified hazards. Meteorological predictions, monitoring of dams as well as socio and ethno-religious crises mentioned by relevant agencies were used as the basis for early warnings and triggers for the probability of occurrence of the identified disasters.

E4E Nigeria project: Plateau State Contingency Plan 2019-20

Coordinating Humanitarian and Emergency Response Appreciation goes to the collaborators who developed the Plateau State Contingency Plan. This plan is a preparedness document which sets out an organised, planned, and coordinated course of action to be followed to minimise hazards. This Contingency Plan has been developed to provide a basis for coordination of humanitarian response in the event of a major/catastrophic disaster for the initial 10 days by the State Government through the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) for 2019-2020. This document adopts the Multi-Risk Approach, and identified flood, fire outbreak, epidemic, communal clashes, and terrorism as probable disasters that can cause high level impact and displacement of persons. A population of 20,000 was used as the benchmark for planning assumptions. The geographical area covered the state based on identified hazards. Meteorological predictions, monitoring of dams as well as socio and ethno-religious crises mentioned by relevant agencies were used as the basis for Early Warnings and triggers for the probability of occurrence of the identified disasters.

Accelerating localisation - Nepali

Recommendations to strengthen leadership of actors in partnership-based humanitarian action in Nepal. (English language also available.)

Accelerating localisation research summary - Nepal

Recommendations for operational practices that strengthen the leadership of national and local actors in partnership-based humanitarian action in Nepal.  Nepali version Who we are This research was commissioned by the Accelerating Localisation Through Partnerships programme – a multi-agency consortium programme funded by the European Commission’s Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid department (ECHO) over two years (2017-2019) – to establish what operational elements of partnerships between local, national and international NGOs are most likely to foster localisation of humanitarian action.  The research was underpinned by a mixed methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data collection approaches. In-depth consultations were conducted in three locations across Nepal to reach a varied sample of local and national actors: Kathmandu, Dhading and surrounding districts, and Dhanusa and surrounding districts. In total, 88 NGOs were consulted for this research in Nepal; 88% of which were local or national NGOs. The findings reflect experiences from a rich diversity of local and national NGOs in Nepal and provide valuable insights that can assist humanitarian organisations in ensuring partnership practices accelerate localisation of humanitarian action.

LPRR final evaluation report

The Linking Preparedness, Response and Resilience (LPRR) project, which is part of the DFID funded Disasters Emergencies Preparedness Programme (DEPP), was carried out from 2015 to the end of March 2018. The project was delivered by a consortium led by Christian Aid, which included Action Aid, Concern, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Safer World, and World Vision. The LPRR project brings together the expertise of response and resilience professionals (and frameworks) in order to support communities affected by emergencies and at the risk of violence. The consortium was present through a research component in eight countries, namely Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Philippines, Colombia, Indonesia, with pilot projects in Kenya, Pakistan and Myanmar. The project was delivered through three distinct strands: conflict prevention, humanitarian response, and learning.

Improving the choices and opportunities for adolescent girls

This toolkit was designed as a guide for religious leaders of both Christian and Islamic faiths in Nigeria as they address the challenges faced by adolescent girls on the issues of early marriage, education, reproductive health services and economic empowerment. It is an initiative of Christian Aid Nigeria, working in partnership with Gender Awareness Trust (GAT) and Development and Peace Initiative (DPI) as part of the Collective Action for Adolescent Girls Initiative (CAAGI). CAAGI seeks to improve the choices and opportunities available to adolescent girls in Northern Nigeria to enable them reach their full potential. The toolkit will guide faith leaders as they provide training and share messages/sermons on the accurate Christian and Islamic perspectives on issues of early marriage, education, reproductive health and economic empowerment of adolescent girls.

LPRR: action learning research

In order for productive learning to occur within the context of this project, monitoring practices must be robust and go beyond collecting data against indicators. This is especially important within a resilience context, as the pre-emptive baseline measurement that is usually used for measuring progress/success is not desirable here. Instead, an ‘outcome harvesting’ approach is more practical, as it does not measure progress towards predetermined outcomes or objectives, but rather collects evidence of what has been achieved, and works backward to determine whether and how the project or intervention contributed to the change. Within the LPRR project there is a need for rigorous evaluation, which balances accountability and learning. Given the ever-evolving evidence base of ‘what works under what conditions’ coupled with the need to demonstrate quality, impactful programming in both upwards and downwards accountability, these types of robust evaluations are essential. In order to ensure learning and accountability are achieved through evaluations, they must be well-planned and budgeted for. This is where the role of the learning strand comes in; by recognising that learning is essential at the outset, it enables it to be included within the design of the project.