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Climate migration in the Dry Corridor of Central America

This study examines the relationship between three factors – migration, gender and climate change – in the Central American Dry Corridor (Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua). Although there is a vast body of literature that addreses each of these factors individually, other studies have not looked at the links between the three. This report is divided into four sections. The first provides the background and context of the Dry Corridor in order to explain why the variables analysed were chosen. The second includes the main testimonies gathered in each of the countries during the fieldwork. The third sets out the main conclusions, and the final section includes a series of recommendations for the inclusion of a gender equality perspective in public policies on climate change.

Migraciones climáticas en el Corredor Seco Centroamericano

This is the orignial Spanish version of a study that examines the relationship between three factors – migration, gender and climate change – in the Central American Dry Corridor (Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua). Although there is a vast body of literature that addreses each of these factors individually, other studies have not looked at the links between the three. This report is divided into four sections. The first provides the background and context of the Dry Corridor in order to explain why the variables analysed were chosen. The second includes the main testimonies gathered in each of the countries during the fieldwork. The third sets out the main conclusions, and the final section includes a series of recommendations for the inclusion of a gender equality perspective in public policies on climate change.

Keeping hope alive: Christian Aid's work on peace - Impact study 2019

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This Impact Study, and accompanying case studies, share some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Key facts In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the Sustainable Development Goals – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. (OECD). Violent conflict has spiked since 2010, with two billion people now living in countries where development outcomes are affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (World Bank, 2018). Much of this violence is due to recurring violence and protracted conflicts. It is estimated that 135 different countries have experienced conflict recurrence – a pattern that is deepening. We stand in solidarity with our local partners – households, community organisations and local leadership who live through conflict and violence first hand. We want governments, faith institutions and communities to want and work for peace in their societies and to keep hope alive. Peace is not something fluffy and aspirational. Peacebuilding can and does work.

Christian Aid en América Latina y el Caribe estrategia (Spanish)

Hemos trabajado en América Latina y el Caribe por más de 30 años, apoyando a nuestras contrapartes para enfrentar la injusticia, las violaciones a los derechos humanos y la desigualdad.