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Precedo Healthcare

Precedo Healthcare partnered with us to deliver a healthier and fairer future

Our partnership with Trade4Life

Read about how the KangaWrap promotes a healthy and safe future for all

Christian Aid Ethiopia Annual Report 2017/18

Christian Aid has been working in Ethiopia for more than 30 years, initially responding to emergencies, but gradually building a long-term development programme. Our work has focused on food security, resilient livelihoods, health, accountable governance, economic justice, energy and climate change. Christian Aid Ethiopia has substantial experience and a strong reputation for working in remote locations, particular with vulnerable pastoral and agro-pastoral communities. Currently we operate in 39 districts in four regions – Oromia, Gambella, Benishangul-Gumuz, and Southern Nation, Nationalities and Peoples’ Region (SNNPR).

Questionable Values? Policy Report

Why we believe that it is time to stop defending the indefensible across all the world’s tax havens. Following the hurricanes Irma and Maria that devastated a number of Caribbean islands in September this year, the focus has rightly been on supporting the hardest hit and those in greatest need. But as the rebuilding effort develops, many are starting to think more deeply about the long-term sustainability of these islands’ economies, and their ability to protect and provide for their populations in an economically and climatically uncertain future. What type of jobs, and what type of economy, should places such as the British Virgin Islands (BVI) be looking to build? This is a question that extends beyond the storm-hit Caribbean. Defensive measures against tax evasion and avoidance are on the rise in the US, the EU and emerging economies, driven in part by the exposure of these activities in successive leaks of information (most recently, the Paradise Papers). Such developments call into question the sustainability of any economic model that relies on providing various combinations of secrecy and low taxation. So far, many small offshore centres, and their supporters, have largely reacted defensively to the threat of change, arguing that media coverage has unfairly maligned ‘tax havens’; that the problem is not as large as portrayed; and that they are already instituting tax and transparency standards better than many large ‘onshore’ economies. However, careful scrutiny of one of the most comprehensive efforts to explain the role of international finance centres and to illustrate the impact that such a territory has on the global economy – the prominent report that the government-backed financial lobby group, BVI Finance, commissioned this year from consultancy firm Capital Economics – demonstrates major weaknesses in the arguments and conclusions presented, and suggests to us that such defences are more concerned with maintaining the status quo than a genuine concern for the wider global economy. Our analysis of the Capital Economics report is an example of why we believe that it is time to stop defending the indefensible across all the world’s tax havens. With public demand building for new regulation, and the ever-present threat of further mass leaks, the UK Government needs to initiate a serious discussion about alternative economic pathways for the British Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies. Alternative futures for offshore tax havens are not only vital for the poorest countries of the world that lose tax revenues each year to the offshore system, but also for the ordinary women and men in places like the BVI, for whom a secure future is dependent on the creation of robust, equitable and sustainable economies.

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 2)

A debilitating drought may bring riots and social unrest in one country, but in a neighbouring country, the same problem may be dealt with by citizen mobilisation towards collective action solutions. To a large extent, governance capacity and community resilience explains the nature and structure of the response. In this report, three case studies – from Angola, Mali, and Honduras – of actual responses to climate change and conflict are presented.

Benefits? Tax Incentives in Latin America and the Caribbean (Spanish)

Overview of the use of tax incentives that analyses whether or not tax incentives bring benefits to countries and communities.(Spanish)

Christian Aid Latin American and Caribbean strategy

We have worked in Latin America and the Caribbean for more than 30 years, supporting our partners to tackle injustice, human rights violations and inequality.

Christian Aid Ethiopia Country Strategy 2012-2017

Ethiopia has one of the world’s fastest-growing populations and is the second most populous country in Africa. While the country is experiencing high levels of economic growth, it still faces major challenges such as food insecurity, cyclical disasters, population pressure, unemployment, disease and natural resource degradation. Christian Aid has worked in Ethiopia for more than 30 years, initially responding to emergencies but gradually building a long-term development programme. Over the years, our work has focused on food security, secure livelihoods, HIV, accountable governance, economic justice, pro-poor energy and climate change. Christian Aid’s country strategy for Ethiopia contributes to several of the global goals laid out in Partnership for Change. We will create conditions in which poor women and men achieve greater influence over decision-making institutions and processes that affect their lives. Through our programme, access to the essential services necessary for good health will increase in remote and vulnerable communities. Christian Aid Ethiopia will work for more productive, sustainable and resilient livelihood opportunities, and fair shares of resources for disadvantaged people, through better market information and access.