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Keeping hope alive: Central America case study

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This case study about Christian Aid's work on peace in Central America, alongside the accompanying reports, shares some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Download the case study above or view the full report here

A brighter future for Kenya's children: CASE-OVC

Christian Aid is working with expert, local partners to help improve the health and wellbeing of vulnerable children in Kenya who have been affected by HIV/AIDS. Find out more about the Comprehensive Assistance, Support and Empowerment of Orphans and Vulnerable Children project (CASE-OVC) and how your support can go even further thanks to a co-funding partnership with USAID.

Gaia Energy

Christian Aid partnership with Gaia Energy

Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management

Governance, gender, peace building and human rights Tackling the problems of poverty, vulnerability and exclusion that persist in parts of the world that continue to be affected by violence or political insecurity is difficult for several reasons. For one, because of the complexity of the prevailing social, economic and political systems, solutions to chronic problems are far from obvious. One response to this aspect of the challenge is adaptive programme design and management. This paper, 'Learning to make a difference: Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management in governance, gender, peace building and human rights', is the product of a multi-year collaboration between ODI and the core team of Christian Aid Ireland to assess the relevance of adaptive or trial-and-error approaches to the field of governance, peace building and human rights. It explains the basis on which Christian Aid Ireland’s current five-year programme funded by Irish Aid has become committed to an adaptive approach. It then describes and seeks to draw lessons from the programme’s first year of experience, considering the possible implications for implementation over the coming years.

LPRR final evaluation report

The Linking Preparedness, Response and Resilience (LPRR) project, which is part of the DFID funded Disasters Emergencies Preparedness Programme (DEPP), was carried out from 2015 to the end of March 2018. The project was delivered by a consortium led by Christian Aid, which included Action Aid, Concern, Help Age, King’s College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Safer World, and World Vision. The LPRR project brings together the expertise of response and resilience professionals (and frameworks) in order to support communities affected by emergencies and at the risk of violence. The consortium was present through a research component in eight countries, namely Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Philippines, Colombia, Indonesia, with pilot projects in Kenya, Pakistan and Myanmar. The project was delivered through three distinct strands: conflict prevention, humanitarian response, and learning.

Exploring the impact of community-based care for vulnerable children

The Community Based Care for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (CBCO) program operated during 2006‐2011 in Nyanza Province and portions of Eastern Province.  Christian Aid partnered with two NGOs, the Benevolent Institute for Development Initiatives (BIDII) in Eastern Province and Anglican Development Services (ADS, formerly known as Inter Diocesan Christian Community Services) in Nyanza Province, to implement the program. The central component of the CBCO program was to support household economic strengthening through the development of village 'saving and loan associations' (SLAs), which for the CBCO program consisted of a group of approximately 30 OVC caregivers.