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Partnership for Change: Christian Aid in Kenya

Christian Aid has been working in Kenya since 1997, in partnership with local civil society agencies, public authorities, private sector actors, churches and other religious organisations. We are working to build community capacities and create enabling environments in which men, women and children can thrive and break out of chronic cycles of poverty.

Appendices - Marsabit County Resilience Study

Appendices to the Marsabit County Resilience Study. A fieldwork study carried out over two weeks in May 2017 to assess the value of investing in resilience work within pastoralist communities. 

Picture Power: Capturing stories of change through photography in Kenya

This report features incredible stories of changes and challenges that the communities captured in photos that they took in their communities as well as data gathered as part of the wider outcome assessment activities.

Kenya: health governance (INTRAC) - a theory-based approach

Kenya is one of five country studies carried out as part of an organisational assessment of Christian Aid’s work on accountable governance.

Kenya: guide to contribution analysis methods

Contribution analysis was used within a series of theory-based evaluations of Christian Aid’s governance portfolio in 2015, specifically in the Kenya country study.  The approach was used to try to understand and evidence to what extent Christian Aid’s and its partners’ governance approaches has contributed to better health outcomes.  This methodological guide was one of the deliverables of the evaluation and is aimed at Christian Aid staff who are interested in understanding alternative approaches to evaluating governance and other hard-to-measure areas of work.  The guide introduces the theory behind contribution analysis and the practical steps taken in applying the approach during the evaluation in Kenya.  Related resources Kenya: a closer look at older age and disability in health programming

Ensuring sustainable growth for India in fair global climate agreement

Outlines the role India can play in laying down the foundations of an agreement in which equity and sustainable development are to the fore.  

LPRR: action learning research

In order for productive learning to occur within the context of this project, monitoring practices must be robust and go beyond collecting data against indicators. This is especially important within a resilience context, as the pre-emptive baseline measurement that is usually used for measuring progress/success is not desirable here. Instead, an ‘outcome harvesting’ approach is more practical, as it does not measure progress towards predetermined outcomes or objectives, but rather collects evidence of what has been achieved, and works backward to determine whether and how the project or intervention contributed to the change. Within the LPRR project there is a need for rigorous evaluation, which balances accountability and learning. Given the ever-evolving evidence base of ‘what works under what conditions’ coupled with the need to demonstrate quality, impactful programming in both upwards and downwards accountability, these types of robust evaluations are essential. In order to ensure learning and accountability are achieved through evaluations, they must be well-planned and budgeted for. This is where the role of the learning strand comes in; by recognising that learning is essential at the outset, it enables it to be included within the design of the project.

Picture Power: Understanding impact through a community lens

Since 2011, members of Kalawani community, Makueni County in lower eastern Kenya, have been working with Christian Aid and our partner ADS Eastern on a PPA-funded Thriving Resilient Livelihoods programme. The aim of the programme is to empower communities to identify and address the risks and problems that prevent them making the most of opportunities to develop. Through the programme, the community is addressing issues of disaster linked to water shortages and drought, climate change, food shortages, lack of employment and income generating opportunities, water-related conflict, environmental degradation and a range of social issues including lack of women’s empowerment, low levels of education and high levels of poor health and disease.

Low-carbon development in South Asia: leapfrogging to a green future

The report gives examples of the potential for low-carbon energy in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan.