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Honour the Promises: One year on from the Rohingya pledging conference

On 23 October 2017, a pledging conference at the United Nations resulted in 36 financial commitments for the Rohingya crisis response. At the time, Christian Aid welcomed the pledges as a 'good start'. However, our new analysis reveals that less than half of funding requirements have been met, a year on. This policy paper explains why it’s time for a comprehensive long-range plan to protect all those displaced by conflict.  

Partnership for Change: Christian Aid in Kenya

Christian Aid has been working in Kenya since 1997, in partnership with local civil society agencies, public authorities, private sector actors, churches and other religious organisations. We are working to build community capacities and create enabling environments in which men, women and children can thrive and break out of chronic cycles of poverty.

Rohingya Crisis response update, April 2018

Christian Aid and its partners have been supporting communities displaced by violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine State, and Rohingya refugees who have crossed the border into Bangladesh. This comprehensive update, from our dedicated team on the ground, provides the very latest information on our response so far, the challenges we have faced and our plans for the way forward, as well as stories of survival from refugees.

Accountability Assessment Rohingya Response Bangladesh

This report provides data and analysis to inform the humanitarian sector on the implementation of accountability systems for the Rohingya camps in the Cox’s Bazar area, Bangladesh. Based on a knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) survey of 373 people (194 women and 179 men), and a review of accountability pilot projects, the analysis highlights the ineffectiveness of current accountability systems, and explores alternatives that could improve the overall accountability ecosystem. If the humanitarian sector is serious about accountability, then we need to promptly and comprehensively address the issues arising in this report and tailor accountability systems towards Rohingya preferences and practices.

Appendices - Marsabit County Resilience Study

Appendices to the Marsabit County Resilience Study. A fieldwork study carried out over two weeks in May 2017 to assess the value of investing in resilience work within pastoralist communities. 

Christian Aid response to the Rohingya pledging conference

Humanitarian policy statement: Christian Aid's response to the UN-backed donor pledging conference for the Rohingya crisis, held on 23 October 2017.

Challenges in the Sahel: Implications for peace and development

A ‘perfect storm’ - an extraordinary combination of poverty, violent conflict, corruption, criminality, and climate change - is blowing over Mali and across the Sahel. Within this storm, some unusual actors have emerged. Politicians are known to be corrupt but still get elected and smugglers are criminalised by authorities but are also the only providers of employment in disintegrating local economies. This report is part of a series that Christian Aid is producing to understand what ought to be done differently in tackling violence and building peace.

LPRR: action learning research

In order for productive learning to occur within the context of this project, monitoring practices must be robust and go beyond collecting data against indicators. This is especially important within a resilience context, as the pre-emptive baseline measurement that is usually used for measuring progress/success is not desirable here. Instead, an ‘outcome harvesting’ approach is more practical, as it does not measure progress towards predetermined outcomes or objectives, but rather collects evidence of what has been achieved, and works backward to determine whether and how the project or intervention contributed to the change. Within the LPRR project there is a need for rigorous evaluation, which balances accountability and learning. Given the ever-evolving evidence base of ‘what works under what conditions’ coupled with the need to demonstrate quality, impactful programming in both upwards and downwards accountability, these types of robust evaluations are essential. In order to ensure learning and accountability are achieved through evaluations, they must be well-planned and budgeted for. This is where the role of the learning strand comes in; by recognising that learning is essential at the outset, it enables it to be included within the design of the project.