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Angola: An exit learning review

This review seeks to celebrate the Angola programme’s thirty-seven years of work.

Advent and Christmas sermon (text)

Text of Dr Paula Gooder's video sermon.

Under the radar

Private sector debt and coronavirus in developing countries The G20 must step in and compel private creditors to cancel the debts of developing countries to avoid the loss of many more lives. In the global south, coronavirus is leaving a trail of devastation - from widespread loss of life from the virus itself, to huge economic disruption that has left hundreds of millions of people, who were already struggling to make ends meet, without jobs or sufficient food. Despite this huge economic shock, many developing countries are continuing to pay off debts to rich countries, public institutions like the World Bank and IMF, and some of the richest banks and hedge funds in the world. This means they have less money to meet the immediate needs of the population. This briefing aims to shine a light on the debt owed to private creditors by five African countries - Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal and Zambia - and it outlines the steps which the G20 needs to take immediately to avert further economic chaos. It highlights the central role of enormous financial corporations like BlackRock, HSBC, Goldman Sachs, Legal & General, JP Morgan and UBS, which have become increasingly important in the world of sovereign debt. Private creditors’ share of the foreign debts of low- and lower-middle income governments increased from 25% in 2010 to 47% in 2018.1 Multi-trillion dollar asset manager BlackRock alone holds close to US$1 billion of ‘Eurobonds’ in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal and Zambia through a number of funds.

Revenue Analysis, July 2020

This analysis aims at finding out how (in monetary terms) COVID-19 is impacting on domestic revenue collection and the extent to which the NRA is meeting its revised target for 2020 and that of the domestic revenue to GDP by 2023. Against this backdrop, the Budget Advocacy Network have decided to start tracking the above policy commitments with a view to give monthly real-time updates. In the meantime, information available from the Accountant General’s Office only include one month of COVID-19 (April). This means that we have included broader analysis to enrich this first issue of the report. 

Prayer for the Democratic Republic of Congo

A prayer for all those affected by the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

Defending the right to water in Angola

Defending rural communities’ right to water: 2018 case study from Angola

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: Tom Kariuki

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. The case study explores insights from Tom Kariuki of the African Academy of Sciences (AAS). Tom describes the vision of the AAS and the evolution of the Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa (AESA), an agenda-setting and funding platform. He reflects on the impact of shifting the centre of gravity for African science to Africa, issues of trust which limit funders’ interest in devolving fund management to African organisations, and the importance of investing in institutional capacity to enable sustainable research leadership in Africa.

Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management

Governance, gender, peace building and human rights Tackling the problems of poverty, vulnerability and exclusion that persist in parts of the world that continue to be affected by violence or political insecurity is difficult for several reasons. For one, because of the complexity of the prevailing social, economic and political systems, solutions to chronic problems are far from obvious. One response to this aspect of the challenge is adaptive programme design and management. This paper, 'Learning to make a difference: Christian Aid Ireland’s adaptive programme management in governance, gender, peace building and human rights', is the product of a multi-year collaboration between ODI and the core team of Christian Aid Ireland to assess the relevance of adaptive or trial-and-error approaches to the field of governance, peace building and human rights. It explains the basis on which Christian Aid Ireland’s current five-year programme funded by Irish Aid has become committed to an adaptive approach. It then describes and seeks to draw lessons from the programme’s first year of experience, considering the possible implications for implementation over the coming years.

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 2)

A debilitating drought may bring riots and social unrest in one country, but in a neighbouring country, the same problem may be dealt with by citizen mobilisation towards collective action solutions. To a large extent, governance capacity and community resilience explains the nature and structure of the response. In this report, three case studies – from Angola, Mali, and Honduras – of actual responses to climate change and conflict are presented.

New pathways out of poverty in Africa: sustainable agriculture

A Christian Aid and CAFOD policy paper investigating how agricultural transformation has become a development priority for African governments and the international development community. It is commonly understood as a shift from ‘low’ productivity subsistence agriculture to more commercially-oriented production. This shift is seen as the first step away from the continent’s continued dependence on raw commodity exports, and towards diversified and domestically integrated economies that provide sufficient employment opportunities to the world’s youngest and fastest-growing population.   This is to be welcomed. However, this report highlights the risk that agricultural transformation strategies already underway in some African countries could increase inequality and further degrade the environment. To prevent this from happening agriculture transformation strategies need to: integrate actions that will build the resilience of producer households and wider ecosystems to climate and economic shocks, instead of focusing predominantly on increasing the productivity of smallholders link smallholder producers to the wider domestic economy.  CAFOD and Christian Aid programmes that support small agro-enterprise development, climate resilience building and inclusive agricultural market development include deliberate actions to ensure equitable and environmentally sustainable outcomes. To further promote the integration of these principles in the design and implementation of government policies, we have initiated an on-going dialogue with our partner organisations in Africa to determine how agricultural transformation policies in their own countries can contribute to more equitable and sustainable development.

Ellis-Hadwin Health Legacy briefing

The Health Legacy Theory of Change tests the assumption that the Christian Aid Community Health approach is appropriate and effective for fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings. Expected outcomes of the Health Legacy programme: CA has an evidence based understanding of how to ensure stronger, integrated health services in fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings. CA has an evidence based understanding of how to ensure improved gender attitudes and changed social norms in fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings. CA has an evidence based understanding of how to ensure accountable, inclusive and responsive health systems in fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings. CA staff and partners have the funding and technical capacity and evidence needed to sustain the implementation of the CH Framework. The realisation of these outcomes will fulfil the objective that ‘the Community Health Framework is appropriate and effective for fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings’. The Expected Impact of achieving this objective is that through our programmes in fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings, ‘Citizens are accessing appropriate, effective, quality, timely and affordable health services that are responsive to their needs’. The expected Impact will contribute to an Overall Expected Impact of ‘Improvement in health outcomes’.

Art of peace - teachers' notes

Age: 16+ (sixth form) Subject areas: Art, geography These notes are designed to help teachers run a sixth form workshop on the art of peace.

Tipping the energy balance

This paper explores the nature and scope of energy financing in six key developing countries: Bangladesh, Cambodia, Bolivia, Nicaragua, Kenya and Malawi.

Sierra Leone - strengthening health systems parliamentary briefing

Discussed during parliamentary debate in 2014 on strengthening health systems in developing countries and development in Sierra Leone and Liberia.

Africa rising? Inequalities and the essential role of fair taxation

Joint report with Tax Justice Network Africa (TJN-A) reveals Africa's much-touted growth is happening alongside worsening income inequality trends.