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Ideas for celebrating a global Harvest - Welsh

Learn more about Janet and the Makande Women's Group; get ideas for Harvest activites and prayer.

Ideas for celebrating a global Harvest

Learn more about Janet and the Makande Women's Group; get ideas for Harvest activites and prayer.

Vaccine debts

This briefing paper explores how Africa’s debt crisis is slowing COVID-19 vaccination, and how vaccine costs threaten to add to the debt burden. 

Advent and Christmas sermon (text)

Text of Dr Paula Gooder's video sermon.

Under the radar

Private sector debt and coronavirus in developing countries The G20 must step in and compel private creditors to cancel the debts of developing countries to avoid the loss of many more lives. In the global south, coronavirus is leaving a trail of devastation - from widespread loss of life from the virus itself, to huge economic disruption that has left hundreds of millions of people, who were already struggling to make ends meet, without jobs or sufficient food. Despite this huge economic shock, many developing countries are continuing to pay off debts to rich countries, public institutions like the World Bank and IMF, and some of the richest banks and hedge funds in the world. This means they have less money to meet the immediate needs of the population. This briefing aims to shine a light on the debt owed to private creditors by five African countries - Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal and Zambia - and it outlines the steps which the G20 needs to take immediately to avert further economic chaos. It highlights the central role of enormous financial corporations like BlackRock, HSBC, Goldman Sachs, Legal & General, JP Morgan and UBS, which have become increasingly important in the world of sovereign debt. Private creditors’ share of the foreign debts of low- and lower-middle income governments increased from 25% in 2010 to 47% in 2018.1 Multi-trillion dollar asset manager BlackRock alone holds close to US$1 billion of ‘Eurobonds’ in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal and Zambia through a number of funds.

Revenue Analysis, July 2020

This analysis aims at finding out how (in monetary terms) COVID-19 is impacting on domestic revenue collection and the extent to which the NRA is meeting its revised target for 2020 and that of the domestic revenue to GDP by 2023. Against this backdrop, the Budget Advocacy Network have decided to start tracking the above policy commitments with a view to give monthly real-time updates. In the meantime, information available from the Accountant General’s Office only include one month of COVID-19 (April). This means that we have included broader analysis to enrich this first issue of the report. 

Church presentation

Use this presentation to help raise awareness in your church of the situation in the Amazon rainforest. 

Prayer for the Democratic Republic of Congo

A prayer for all those affected by the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

Fair and equitable research partnerships case study: Tom Kariuki

Funding for research in international development often includes a focus on fair and equitable partnerships. Academics from the global North are increasingly encouraged by funders to include academic partners based in the global South and civil society practitioners in their research projects. But achieving this is complicated: partnership and research are both political. This case study is one of a set of resources that has been designed to help academics, NGOs, CSOs, research brokers and funders put principles for fair and equitable research partnerships into practice. The case study explores insights from Tom Kariuki of the African Academy of Sciences (AAS). Tom describes the vision of the AAS and the evolution of the Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa (AESA), an agenda-setting and funding platform. He reflects on the impact of shifting the centre of gravity for African science to Africa, issues of trust which limit funders’ interest in devolving fund management to African organisations, and the importance of investing in institutional capacity to enable sustainable research leadership in Africa.

Questionable Values? Policy Report

Why we believe that it is time to stop defending the indefensible across all the world’s tax havens. Following the hurricanes Irma and Maria that devastated a number of Caribbean islands in September this year, the focus has rightly been on supporting the hardest hit and those in greatest need. But as the rebuilding effort develops, many are starting to think more deeply about the long-term sustainability of these islands’ economies, and their ability to protect and provide for their populations in an economically and climatically uncertain future. What type of jobs, and what type of economy, should places such as the British Virgin Islands (BVI) be looking to build? This is a question that extends beyond the storm-hit Caribbean. Defensive measures against tax evasion and avoidance are on the rise in the US, the EU and emerging economies, driven in part by the exposure of these activities in successive leaks of information (most recently, the Paradise Papers). Such developments call into question the sustainability of any economic model that relies on providing various combinations of secrecy and low taxation. So far, many small offshore centres, and their supporters, have largely reacted defensively to the threat of change, arguing that media coverage has unfairly maligned ‘tax havens’; that the problem is not as large as portrayed; and that they are already instituting tax and transparency standards better than many large ‘onshore’ economies. However, careful scrutiny of one of the most comprehensive efforts to explain the role of international finance centres and to illustrate the impact that such a territory has on the global economy – the prominent report that the government-backed financial lobby group, BVI Finance, commissioned this year from consultancy firm Capital Economics – demonstrates major weaknesses in the arguments and conclusions presented, and suggests to us that such defences are more concerned with maintaining the status quo than a genuine concern for the wider global economy. Our analysis of the Capital Economics report is an example of why we believe that it is time to stop defending the indefensible across all the world’s tax havens. With public demand building for new regulation, and the ever-present threat of further mass leaks, the UK Government needs to initiate a serious discussion about alternative economic pathways for the British Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies. Alternative futures for offshore tax havens are not only vital for the poorest countries of the world that lose tax revenues each year to the offshore system, but also for the ordinary women and men in places like the BVI, for whom a secure future is dependent on the creation of robust, equitable and sustainable economies.

New pathways out of poverty in Africa: sustainable agriculture

A Christian Aid and CAFOD policy paper investigating how agricultural transformation has become a development priority for African governments and the international development community. It is commonly understood as a shift from ‘low’ productivity subsistence agriculture to more commercially-oriented production. This shift is seen as the first step away from the continent’s continued dependence on raw commodity exports, and towards diversified and domestically integrated economies that provide sufficient employment opportunities to the world’s youngest and fastest-growing population.   This is to be welcomed. However, this report highlights the risk that agricultural transformation strategies already underway in some African countries could increase inequality and further degrade the environment. To prevent this from happening agriculture transformation strategies need to: integrate actions that will build the resilience of producer households and wider ecosystems to climate and economic shocks, instead of focusing predominantly on increasing the productivity of smallholders link smallholder producers to the wider domestic economy.  CAFOD and Christian Aid programmes that support small agro-enterprise development, climate resilience building and inclusive agricultural market development include deliberate actions to ensure equitable and environmentally sustainable outcomes. To further promote the integration of these principles in the design and implementation of government policies, we have initiated an on-going dialogue with our partner organisations in Africa to determine how agricultural transformation policies in their own countries can contribute to more equitable and sustainable development.

Ellis-Hadwin Health Legacy briefing

The Health Legacy Theory of Change tests the assumption that the Christian Aid Community Health approach is appropriate and effective for fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings. Expected outcomes of the Health Legacy programme: CA has an evidence based understanding of how to ensure stronger, integrated health services in fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings. CA has an evidence based understanding of how to ensure improved gender attitudes and changed social norms in fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings. CA has an evidence based understanding of how to ensure accountable, inclusive and responsive health systems in fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings. CA staff and partners have the funding and technical capacity and evidence needed to sustain the implementation of the CH Framework. The realisation of these outcomes will fulfil the objective that ‘the Community Health Framework is appropriate and effective for fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings’. The Expected Impact of achieving this objective is that through our programmes in fragile states and supply and resource challenged settings, ‘Citizens are accessing appropriate, effective, quality, timely and affordable health services that are responsive to their needs’. The expected Impact will contribute to an Overall Expected Impact of ‘Improvement in health outcomes’.

Scandal of inequality 2 infographic (Spanish)

Infographic to accompany the Scandal of inequality 2 report

The scandal of inequality 2 infographic (English)

Infographic to accompany the Scandal of inequality 2 report (English)

The Scandal of Inequality 2 (Spanish)

Describe las diferentes caras de la desigualdad en America Latina y el Caribe