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Keeping hope alive: Christian Aid's work on peace - Impact study 2019

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This Impact Study, and accompanying case studies, share some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Key facts In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the Sustainable Development Goals – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. (OECD). Violent conflict has spiked since 2010, with two billion people now living in countries where development outcomes are affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (World Bank, 2018). Much of this violence is due to recurring violence and protracted conflicts. It is estimated that 135 different countries have experienced conflict recurrence – a pattern that is deepening. We stand in solidarity with our local partners – households, community organisations and local leadership who live through conflict and violence first hand. We want governments, faith institutions and communities to want and work for peace in their societies and to keep hope alive. Peace is not something fluffy and aspirational. Peacebuilding can and does work.

Keeping hope alive: internal investment fund review 2017-18

In 2015, Christian Aid established an internal investment fund to encourage a more specific focus on tackling violence and building peace, in line with the organisation’s strategic objectives.   This has involved:  four annual rounds of funding to date £400,000–£500,000 allocated to the fund each year projects supported in 16 countries, with budgets of £20,000–£100,000 projects funded subject to a competitive selection process. This review is part of a collection of content - 'Keeping hope alive'. Download the review above or view the full report here Context In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the international community for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. This rise in violence has been accompanied by a global undermining of civil society space and an increase in attacks on those at the frontline of protecting human rights and calling for peace locally, with more than 300 murdered in 2017. It is clear that peacebuilding efforts are off course and that development and faith-based actors have a role to play in changing violence to peace.  

Cyclone Fani Appeal church presentation

A presentation to share with your church.

World Bank & IMF briefings

Read our briefing papers ahead of the World Bank Group's 2019 Spring Meetings The Big Shift Needed for Climate Justice A Just Global Economy Leave No One Behind? From Violence to Peace

Invitation to tender: policy brief on illicit economies

Invitation to Tender: Policy Brief on Illicit Economies for the GCRF-ESRC Drugs and (Dis)Order Research Project Christian Aid’s ‘From Violence to Peace’ team is recruiting for a short-term consultant to help us write a policy brief on the links between illicit economies and the SDGs. Download the terms of reference for full details and requirements.  Overview Christian Aid will publish an annual policy brief, which will be the foundational piece for its engagement in the GCRF-ESRC project’s global advocacy engagement each year, targeted at key UN Member States, critical development actors and the World Bank. This Brief is designed to initiate and sustain policy conversations with a non-academic audience – i.e. development and peacebuilding practitioners, elected representatives, MEPs, faith leaders, donor agency staff, other NGOs, or journalists – on the issue of illicit economies and the nature of the transition required from war economies to peace economies. Budget The guiding budget for this piece of work is £5,000.  Deadline Tenders can be sent either via email or in hard copy to Christian Aid Ireland no later than 12 noon 6 March 2019. Tenders should be addressed to: Eric Gutierrez egutierrez@christian-aid.org and Karol Balfe, kbalfe@christian-aid.org  Timetable We invite consultants or academics to tender for this research and propose a relevant methodology and timeline. A first draft should be completed by April 19 2019, with a final draft by early May 2019. Project management Christian Aid Ireland’s Senior Policy Adviser on From Violence to Peace will be responsible for managing this project. Qualifications and experience required It is expected that the institution/consultant would have a high level of expertise and experience in the fields of illicit economies, enterprise development and/or peacebuilding. They must have significant experience in policy work related to contexts affected by violence with complex political contexts. They must have a high level of expertise in gathering and analysing qualitative evidence as well as a strong understanding of locally led and partnership-based approaches to development. A proven ability to work with a team of people towards a shared output is required as well as a clear willingness to adapt to local context, culture and working in challenging environments  

Photo of Hamza

Use this image of young refugee and peacemaker Hamza to show alongside the Christmas Assembly.

September meditation

Farming, cooking, carrying firewood: life was a constant struggle for Aster. Now she’s come together with women in her village, in Ethiopia, to open a shop powered by the sun. It's a thriving business and a resource for the community - it has sown the seeds of a better future. Stand together with our sisters and brothers in Ethiopia this Harvest, and give thanks for our global family, as we meditate on these words of the Harvest prayer.

A FAIR deal for IDPs 4: Agenda 2030

Agenda 2030 offers an unrivalled chance to ensure that response and aid delivers for IDPs. What does it need to succeed?

A FAIR deal for IDPs 3: Funding

How can we address the root causes of - and put an end to - long-term displacement?

Integrated Conflict Prevention and Resilience Field Guide

This is a field guide for staff implementing the guidance laid out in the Integrated Conflict Prevention and Resilience Handbook. It summarises key points from the handbook and lays out a series of top tips and guiding questions for project and programme staff working in conflict-affected contexts. It aims to help staff to integrate a conflict-sensitive approach into key stages of programme design and implementation.

Integrated Conflict Prevention and Resilience Handbook

When communities are affected by conflict, they are more vulnerable to a wide range of other shocks and stresses, including natural hazards. Likewise, the ability of a community to manage tensions and withstand shocks, without a significant increase in conflict, can be seen as a key indicator of that community’s resilience. Poorly planned development or humanitarian interventions can also contribute to an increase in conflict. Therefore it is important that preventing conflict must form a key component of any intervention that genuinely seeks to build community resilience. This guide will support agencies to strengthen community resilience more effectively in conflict-affected contexts. It does so by providing step-by-step guidance on how to integrate a conflict-sensitive approach into pre-existing and commonly-applied resilience-strengthening methodologies. It is, to our knowledge, the first time that specific guidance of this kind has been developed.

A FAIR deal for IDPs 2: Respect the laws protecting uprooted people

How can the laws to protect internally displaced people (IDPs) be respected?

January meditation

A prayer and blessing to welcome the dawn of the New Year with hope. 

Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire (Part 1)

In this policy briefing, Christian Aid examines the links between climate change and conflict, and begins to elaborate on its argument that the best form of climate security is climate justice.