Skip to main content

We found 29

Showing 1 - 18

Christian Aid Partnership Policy

Towards mutual partnerships

UK Climate Fair Share

This technical paper describes the calculations behind an infographic (2020) that describes the UK's 'Fair Share' of emissions reduction to meet the targets of the Paris Agreement. It includes  a memo provided by the Climate Equity Reference Project, which carried out the fair shares analysis based on the Climate Equity Reference Framework. The memo describes the global mitigation pathway and the effort sharing framework used, and shows results for the UK. It also describes the assumptions and judgements taken by the UK groups that jointly produced the infographic, for making conclusions about  financial resources required for the UK to implement its fair share.    

Pathways to Localisation: locally led humanitarian response (Myanmar)

This Myanmar-language paper presents a synthesis of the four national frameworks into one global localisation framework relevant for humanitarian practitioners, policy-makers and decision-makers. It outlines: The notable differences between the four national localisation frameworks, and reflect the diverse contexts specific to the very different operating environments and humanitarian crises in Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria and South Sudan. A number of priority actions and areas common across the four frameworks, many of which link closely to existing localisation commitments, frameworks, and indicators which are referenced. The key areas included in all four national localisation frameworks, along with objectives, priority actions, and potential indicators.

Keeping hope alive: Christian Aid's work on peace - Impact study 2019

Without an explicit focus on peace, there can be no sustainable development. This Impact Study, and accompanying case studies, share some of our story of taking peace seriously. Throughout our work in providing humanitarian assistance and long-term development support, it has become clear that we cannot ignore the reality of violence. Peace and justice matter to us as a faith-based organisation and we seek to respond to real challenges of building peace with integrity, respect, courage and hope. From Violence to Peace lays down our hopeful vision that a more peaceful reality free from poverty, violence and injustice is possible. This study shares key examples of impact and some things we’ve learnt along the way. Key facts In 2016, more countries experienced violent conflict than at any time in nearly 30 years. If current trends persist, by 2030 – the horizon set by the Sustainable Development Goals – more than half of the world’s poor will be living in countries affected by high levels of violence. (OECD). Violent conflict has spiked since 2010, with two billion people now living in countries where development outcomes are affected by fragility, conflict, and violence (World Bank, 2018). Much of this violence is due to recurring violence and protracted conflicts. It is estimated that 135 different countries have experienced conflict recurrence – a pattern that is deepening. We stand in solidarity with our local partners – households, community organisations and local leadership who live through conflict and violence first hand. We want governments, faith institutions and communities to want and work for peace in their societies and to keep hope alive. Peace is not something fluffy and aspirational. Peacebuilding can and does work.

Generando Empresas y Derechos Humanos

Las prácticas corporativas irresponsables representan graves riesgos para los derechos humanos. A menudo, tienen impactos que afectan a las personas de manera diferente debido a su género, haciendo que las desigualdades que ya experimentan sean aún mayores. En este informe, identificamos estudios de casos, destacamos temas clave sobre el impacto de género de las prácticas corporativas y exploramos su relación con el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos y los marcos relacionados. Creemos que las empresas, en particular las empresas transnacionales, deben hacer valer los derechos humanos y deben ser responsabilizadas por el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos. También creemos que el Marco de Negocios y Derechos Humanos de la ONU, sus mecanismos de implementación, y los estados y entidades comerciales a los que se aplica, deben responder mejor a los impactos negativos de las empresas en los derechos de las mujeres y los géneros marginados.

Engendering Business and Human Rights

The UN Business and Human Rights Framework must respond better to the negative impacts of business on the rights of women.

Accelerating localisation research summary - Myanmar-language version

Recommendations for practices that strengthen the leadership of national and local actors in partnership-based humanitarian action in Myanmar. Read the English-language version here

Christian Aid response to the Rohingya pledging conference

Humanitarian policy statement: Christian Aid's response to the UN-backed donor pledging conference for the Rohingya crisis, held on 23 October 2017.

Christian Aid and the Leave No One Behind Agenda

The call to ‘Leave No One Behind’ puts equity at the heart of the development and humanitarian agenda for the coming decades. At Christian Aid, we have an ambition to see an end to poverty for all but glaring inequalities mean that we are not starting with the level playing field needed to bring about this change. Some groups and individuals have been marginalised or excluded for centuries and need greater attention than others. Without this focus on equity, we will see a continuation of ‘a rising tide that lifts all boats’ approach that excludes millions of the poorest people and deepens the inequalities that drive conflict, poverty and discrimination. This document is a summary of how Christian Aid views the implications of the principle Leave NoOne Behind in its programme practice. It sets out the heritage of work that Christian Aid brings to this commitment, its current approaches, and ways forward as we seek to make the goal of ‘Equality for All’ a reality in and throughout our programmes. Our work is evolving quickly in this area and so we have sought to create a snapshot of where we are now rather than provide extensive details of the work or long guidance documents. Given the entrenched power imbalances that will need to be challenged and changed by action at personal, local, national, regional and global levels, we know this is a long and complex journey but it is one which is at the very heart of our vision.

Central America governance programming – video methods

This note summarises the approach used to make two short videos contrasting the work of Christian Aid funded governance programmes, one in Guatemala and the other in El Salvador. It sets out the challenges, learning and insights from the process from the perspective of the producers of the videos – and makes recommendations for how to approach similar projects in the future. Related resources Video: Guatemala Video: El Salvador

Bangladesh – accountable governance - a theory-based approach

Christian Aid Bangladesh (CAB) has been implementing the Humanitarian Accountability Partnership (HAP) Standards in Accountability and Quality Management1 since 2011, as part of its accountable governance mechanisms. Along with its partners, Christian Aid (CA) also uses Participatory Vulnerability and Capacity Analysis (PVCA), a tool for empowering communities to undertake risk and capacity analyses and action planning . The use of both HAP Standards and PVCA is seen as important for CAB and its partners in taking a more systematic approach to downwards accountability in its programme work. In Bangladesh, three partner organisations have piloted and been most involved with implementing HAP Standards with CAB support - Gana Unnayan Kendra (GUK); Dushtha Shasthya Kendra (DSK); and the Christian Commission for Development in Bangladesh (CCDB). Each of them are CA partners in the Department for International Development (DfID)-funded ‘Programme Partnership Arrangement’ (PPA) programme. This evaluation focussed on the use, and added value of HAP and PVCA in their recovery and resilience work within the PPA. Related resources Methodology: process tracking

LPRR: action learning research

In order for productive learning to occur within the context of this project, monitoring practices must be robust and go beyond collecting data against indicators. This is especially important within a resilience context, as the pre-emptive baseline measurement that is usually used for measuring progress/success is not desirable here. Instead, an ‘outcome harvesting’ approach is more practical, as it does not measure progress towards predetermined outcomes or objectives, but rather collects evidence of what has been achieved, and works backward to determine whether and how the project or intervention contributed to the change. Within the LPRR project there is a need for rigorous evaluation, which balances accountability and learning. Given the ever-evolving evidence base of ‘what works under what conditions’ coupled with the need to demonstrate quality, impactful programming in both upwards and downwards accountability, these types of robust evaluations are essential. In order to ensure learning and accountability are achieved through evaluations, they must be well-planned and budgeted for. This is where the role of the learning strand comes in; by recognising that learning is essential at the outset, it enables it to be included within the design of the project.

Christian Aid's Policy on Family Planning

This organisational policy document outlines Christian Aid's position on family planning.

ACT Alliance Humanitarian Policy and Practice Position Paper

ACT Alliance Humanitarian Policy and Practice Advisory Group Position Paper for the World Humanitarian Summit

The World Humanitarian Summit: Putting people at the centre

ACT Alliance Humanitarian Policy and Practice Advisory Group Position Paper for the World Humanitarian Summit.